Crash of a Socata TBM-850 in Breckenridge

Date & Time: Oct 14, 2019 at 1243 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N850NK
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
San Angelo - Breckenridge
MSN:
432
YOM:
2007
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The single engine airplane departed San Angelo-Mathis Field at 1210LT on a short flight to Breckenridge. While approaching Breckenridge-Stephens County Airport, the engine failed and caught fire. The pilot reduced his altitude and completed a belly landing in an open field located near the airport. Both occupants escaped uninjured while the aircraft was partially destroyed by fire.

Crash of an Antonov AN-12BK in Lviv: 5 killed

Date & Time: Oct 4, 2019 at 0648 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
UR-CAH
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Vigo - Lviv
MSN:
8345604
YOM:
1968
Flight number:
UKL4050
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
8
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:
The four engine airplane departed Vigo Airport, Spain, at 2330LT on the evening of October 3. Following an uneventful flight, the crew initiated the descent to Lviv-Danylo Halytsky Airport when he encountered marginal weather conditions with limited visibility due to fog. On final approach to runway 31, the crew failed to realize his altitude was too low when the airplane struck the ground and crashed in bushes located about 1,500 meters short of runway threshold. Five crew members were killed while three others were injured. At the time of the accident, the horizontal visibility was about 800 meters in fog with a vertical visibility of 200 feet.

Crash of a Socata TBM-700 in Lansing: 3 killed

Date & Time: Oct 3, 2019 at 0857 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N700AQ
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Indianapolis - Lansing
MSN:
252
YOM:
2003
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
On a final ILS approach to Lansing-Capital Region Airport, the crew was cleared to land on runway 10R when the single engine airplane lost height and crashed in a field located few dozen yards short of runway threshold. Three occupants were killed while three others were critically injured.

Crash of a Boeing B-17G-30-BO Flying Fortress in Windsor Locks: 7 killed

Date & Time: Oct 2, 2019 at 0955 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N93012
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Windsor Locks - Windsor Locks
MSN:
7023
YOM:
1942
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
10
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
7
Circumstances:
On October 2, 2019, at 0953 eastern daylight time, a Boeing B-17G, N93012, owned and operated by the Collings Foundation, was destroyed during a precautionary landing and subsequent runway excursion at Bradley International Airport (BDL), Windsor Locks, Connecticut. The commercial pilot, airline transport pilot, and five passengers were fatally injured. The flight mechanic/loadmaster and four passengers were seriously injured, while one passenger and one person on the ground incurred minor injuries. The local commercial sightseeing flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, in accordance with a Living History Flight Experience exemption granted by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area and no flight plan was filed for the flight, which departed BDL at 0947. On the morning of the accident flight, an airport lineman at BDL assisted the loadmaster as he added 160 gallons of 100LL aviation fuel to the accident airplane. The lineman stated that the accident airplane was the first to be fueled with 100LL fuel that day. According to preliminary air traffic control (ATC) data provided by the FAA, shortly after takeoff, at 0950, one of the pilots reported to ATC that he wanted to return to the airport. At that time, the airplane was about 500 ft above ground level (agl) on the right crosswind leg of the airport traffic pattern for runway 6. The approach controller verified the request and asked if the pilot required any assistance, to which he replied no. The controller then asked for the reason for the return to the airport, and the pilot replied that the airplane had a "rough mag" on the No. 4 engine. The controller then instructed the pilot to fly a right downwind leg for runway 6 and confirmed that the flight needed an immediate landing. He subsequently cancelled the approach of another airplane and advised the pilot to proceed however necessary to runway 6. The approach controller instructed the pilot to contact the tower controller, which he did. The tower controller reported that the wind was calm and cleared the flight to land on runway 6. The pilot acknowledged the landing clearance; at that time, the airplane was about 300 ft agl on a midfield right downwind leg for runway 6. The tower controller asked about the airplane's progress to the runway and the pilot replied that they were "getting there" and on the right downwind leg. No further communications were received from the accident airplane. Witness statements and airport surveillance video confirmed that the airplane struck approach lights about 1,000 ft prior to the runway, then contacted the ground about 500 ft prior to the runway before reaching runway 6. It then veered right off the runway before colliding with vehicles and a deicing fluid tank about 1,100 ft right of the center of the runway threshold. The wreckage came to rest upright and the majority of the cabin, cockpit, and right wing were consumed by postimpact fire. The landing gear was extended and measurement of the left and right wing flap jackscrews corresponded to a flaps retracted setting. The flap remained attached to the right wing and the aileron was consumed by fire. The flap and aileron remained attached to the left wing and a section of flap was consumed by fire. The empennage, elevator, and rudder remained intact. Control continuity was confirmed from the elevator, rudder, elevator trim, and rudder trim from each respective control surface to the area in the cabin consumed by fire, and then forward to the cockpit controls. Elevator trim and rudder trim cables were pulled during impact and their preimpact position on their respective drum at the control surfaces could not be determined. The left wing aileron trim tab remained intact and its pushrod was connected but bent. The left aileron bellcrank separated from the wing, but the aileron cables remained attached to it and the aileron cable remained attached in cockpit. The Nos. 1 and 2 engines remained partially attached to the left wing and all three propeller blades remained attached to each engine. One propeller blade attached to engine No. 1 exhibited an 8-inch tip separation; the separated section traveled about 700 ft before coming to rest near an airport building. Another propeller blade on the No. 1 engine exhibited chordwise scratching and leading edge gouging. The third propeller blade was bent aft. The No. 2 engine propeller blades exhibited leading edge gouges and chordwise scratches. The No. 3 engine was recovered from the top of the deicing tank. One blade was impact damaged and near the feather position. The other two blades appeared in a position between low pitch and feather. One propeller blade exhibited a 5-inch tip separation and the separated tip sections were recovered from 100 ft and 700 ft from the main wreckage. The No. 4 engine was recovered from the deice building. All three propeller blades on the No. 4 engine appeared in the feather position. The wreckage was retained for further examination. A fuel sample was able to be recovered from one of the No 3. engine's two fuel tanks. The recovered sample had a visual appearance and smell consistent with 100LL aviation fuel and was absent of debris or water contamination. Following the accident, the fuel truck used to service the airplane was quarantined and subsequent testing revealed no anomalies of the truck's equipment or fuel supply. Additionally, none of the airplanes serviced with fuel from the truck before or after the accident airplane, including another airplane operated by the Collings Foundation, reported any anomalies. The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multiengine land, instrument airplane, and held a type rating for the B-17. In addition, he held a mechanic certificate with airframe and powerplant ratings. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on January 9, 2019. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 14,500 hours. The co-pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multiengine land, and instrument airplane, with type ratings for B-737, B-757, B-767, DC-10, and LR-Jet. In addition, he held a flight engineer certificate as well as a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on January 8, 2019. At that time, he reported a total flight experience of 22,000 hours. The airplane was manufactured in 1944, issued a limited airworthiness certificate in 1994, and equipped with passenger seats in 1995. It was powered by four Wright R-1820-97, 1,200- horsepower engines, each equipped with a three-blade, constant-speed Hamilton Standard propeller. The airplane was maintained under an airworthiness inspection program, which incorporated an annual inspection, and 25-hour, 50-hour, 75-hour, and 100-hour progressive inspections. Review of maintenance records revealed that the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on January 16, 2019. At that time, the airframe had accumulated about 11,120 total hours of operation. Engine Nos. 1, 2, and 3 had 0 hours since major overhaul at that time. Engine No. 4 had 838.2 hours since major overhaul at that time. The airplane's most recent progressive inspection, which was the 100-hour inspection, was completed on September 23, 2019. At that time, the airplane had been operated about 268 hours since the annual inspection. The recorded weather at BDL at 0951 included calm wind; 10 statute miles visibility; few clouds at 11,000 ft; few clouds at 14,000 ft; broken clouds at 18,000 ft; temperature 23°C; dew point 19°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.81 inches of mercury.

Crash of a Gulfstream GIIB in Blue Creek

Date & Time: Sep 30, 2019
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
MSN:
199
YOM:
1977
Country:
Crew on board:
0
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Apparently engaged in an illegal flight, the unregistered aircraft crashed in unknown circumstances in a field located in Blue Creek after the crew attempted to land on a dirt road. The aircraft crashed and came to rest, broken in two. All occupants escaped from the area and no one was found in the airplane. Also, it was reported that no contraband was found on board. At the time of the accident, the airplane has no official registration on fuselage, except letters PVO on the engines.

Crash of a Cessna 208 Caravan I in Gransee: 1 killed

Date & Time: Sep 11, 2019 at 1510 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
D-FIDI
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Gransee - Gransee
MSN:
208-0301
YOM:
1999
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
In the mid-afternoon, the single engine airplane departed the grassy runway at Gransee Airfield, carrying 14 skydivers and one pilot on a local flight. After all 14 skydivers jumped out of the cabin, the pilot returned to the airport when, on final approach, the aircraft struck a tree and crashed in unknown circumstances. The airplane was destroyed and the pilot was killed.

Crash of a Convair CV-440F in Toledo: 2 killed

Date & Time: Sep 11, 2019 at 0238 LT
Registration:
N24DR
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Millington-Memphis - Toledo
MSN:
393
YOM:
1957
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The Convair, owned and operated by Douglas R. Taylor, departed Millington-Memphis Airport on a cargo flight to Toledo-Express Airport. On approach to runway 25, the airplane crashed in flames on a truck parking lot located about 3,000 feet from runway 25 threshold, to the left of its extended centerline. The aircraft was totally destroyed and both pilots were killed.

Crash of a Cessna 560XL Citation Excel in Aligarh

Date & Time: Aug 27, 2019
Operator:
Registration:
VT-AVV
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
New Delhi - Aligarh
MSN:
560-5259
YOM:
2002
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The airplane departed New Delhi-Palam Airport on a positioning flight to Aligarh-Dhanipur Airport for maintenance purposes. On final approach, the airplane struck power cable then landed hard on runway 11/29. Out of control, it veered off runway and came to rest in flames in a grassy area. All six occupants escaped without injuries while the aircraft was totally destroyed by a post crash fire.

Crash of a Cessna 680A Citation Latitude in Elizabethton

Date & Time: Aug 15, 2019 at 1540 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N8JR
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Statesville - Elizabethton
MSN:
680A-0010
YOM:
2015
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Aircraft flight hours:
1165
Circumstances:
On August 15, 2019, about 1537 eastern daylight time, a Textron Aviation Inc. 680A, N8JR, was destroyed during a runway excursion after landing at Elizabethton Municipal Airport (0A9), Elizabethton, Tennessee. The airline transport-rated pilot and copilot were not injured. The three passengers sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to JRM Air LLC and operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight. The flight originated at Statesville Regional Airport (SVH), Statesville, North Carolina at 1519 and was destined for 0A9. According to the flight crew, the flight departed SVH under visual flight rules and climbed to 12,500 ft. No air traffic control services were requested. The preflight, departure, and en route portions of the flight were routine. Approaching 0A9, the crew announced their intentions to
land on runway 24 via the airport's common traffic advisory frequency Airport surveillance video captured the initial touchdown, which occurred near the runway touchdown zone, and portions of the accident sequence. The airplane bounced twice, then continued airborne down runway 24 until it touched down a third time with about 1,000 ft of paved surface remaining. The video revealed that the right main landing gear collapsed and the outboard section of the right wing contacted the runway shortly after the third touchdown. The airplane departed the paved surface beyond the runway 24 departure end threshold, through an open area of grass, down an embankment, through a chain-link fence, and up an embankment, coming to rest on the edge of Tennessee Highway 91. The pilots' account of the landing was generally consistent with the video. The pilots also reported that, following the second bounce, a go-around was attempted; however, the airplane did not respond as expected, so they landed straight-ahead on the runway and could not stop the airplane prior to the excursion. After the airplane came to a stop, the flight crew secured the engines and assisted the passengers with the evacuation. The main entry door was utilized to exit the airplane. A postaccident fire was in progress during the evacuation. The airplane came to rest upright, on a true heading of 285º. The fuselage aft of the main entry door, the right wing, and the empennage were consumed by the postaccident fire. The left main and nose landing gear were separated from the airframe during the impact sequence. The right main landing gear remained under the right wing and was heavily fire damaged. The airplane, also known as the Citation Latitude, was a low wing, cruciform tail design with twin, fuselage-mounted Pratt and Whitney Canada 360D turbofan engines. It was equipped with two cockpit seats and nine passenger seats. The airplane was built in 2015 and the owner purchased the airplane new. The total time of the airframe was about 1,165 hours. The maximum takeoff weight was 31,025 lbs. The cockpit, which was undamaged by fire, was equipped with a Garmin G5000 advanced integrated flight deck (flat screen displays and touch screen controls) that recorded numerous flight and systems parameters. The data was successfully downloaded following the accident. The airplane was also equipped with a cockpit voice recorder (CVR). The CVR was damaged by the postaccident fire and was sent to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Laboratory, Washington, DC for examination and download. The pilot, seated in the left cockpit seat and acting as the flying pilot and pilot-in-command,
held an airline transport pilot certificate and a type rating in the accident airplane. He reported 5,800 hours total flight experience, including 765 hours in the accident airplane. His latest recurrent training occurred in October 2018. The copilot, seated in the right cockpit seat, held an airline transport pilot certificate and a type rating in the accident airplane. He reported 11,000 hours total flight experience, including 1,165 hours in the accident airplane. His latest recurrent training occurred in October 2018. The reported weather at 0A9 at 1535 included calm wind, 10 miles visibility, scattered clouds at 4,700 and 5,500 ft, broken clouds at 7,000 ft, and altimeter setting 29.97 inches of mercury. The wreckage was retained for further examination. All five occupants were able to evacuate the cabin before the aircraft would be completely destroyed by fire. Runway 24 is 4,500 feet long with a displaced threshold (LDA is 4,100 feet). Passengers were the US Nascar racer Dale Earnhardt, his wife and daughter.

Crash of a Cessna 510 Citation Mustang in Los Ángeles: 1 killed

Date & Time: Aug 6, 2019 at 1820 LT
Operator:
Registration:
CC-ANR
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Concepción - Los Ángeles
MSN:
510-0455
YOM:
2013
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
On final approach to Los Ángeles-María Dolores Airport, the airplane crashed in flames in a wooded area located about 500 meters short of runway 18. The aircraft was destroyed by impact forces and a post crash fire and the pilot, sole on board, was killed. The accident occurred 19 minutes after sunset.