Crash of a Beechcraft 350 Super King Air in Pansol: 9 killed

Date & Time: Sep 1, 2019 at 1510 LT
Operator:
Registration:
RP-C2296
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Dipolog - Manila
MSN:
FL-196
YOM:
1998
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
9
Circumstances:
The twin engine airplane was completing an ambulance flight from Dipolog and Manila, carrying seven passengers and a crew of two. While cruising in marginal weather conditions, the airplane went out of control and crashed into several houses located in the city of Pansol, about 40 km southeast of Manila-Ninoy Aquino Airport. The aircraft was destroyed and all nine people on board were killed. There were apparently no injuries on the ground.

Crash of a Beechcraft 200 Super King Air in Gillam

Date & Time: Apr 24, 2019 at 1900 LT
Operator:
Registration:
C-FRMV
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Winnipeg - Churchill
MSN:
BB-979
YOM:
1982
Location:
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The twin engine airplane was on its way from Winnipeg to Churchill, carrying two paramedics and two pilots on an ambulance flight. While passing over Gillam, the crew encountered an unexpected situation, declared an emergency and diverted to Gillam Airport. On final approach, the airplane struck the icy surface of Stephens Lake. While contacting the shore, both main gears were torn off and the airplane came to a rest near the runway threshold. All four occupants were evacuated safely.

Crash of a Beechcraft B200 Super King Air off Kake: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jan 29, 2019 at 1811 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N13LY
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Anchorage - Kake
MSN:
BB-1718
YOM:
2000
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
On January 29, 2019, about 1811 Alaska standard time, a twin-engine, turbine-powered Raytheon Aircraft Company (formerly Beech Aircraft Corporation) B200 airplane, N13LY, is presumed destroyed after impacting the waters of Frederick Sound following a loss of control while on approach to Kake Airport (PAFE), Kake, Alaska. The airplane was being operated by Guardian Flight as an instrument flight rules (IFR) air ambulance flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 when the accident occurred. The airline transport pilot, flight paramedic, and flight nurse who was 27 weeks pregnant are presumed fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the destination airport, and company flight following procedures were in effect. The flight departed Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport (PANC), Anchorage, Alaska, about 1604 destined for PAFE. A preliminary review of archived voice communication information from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) contained the following verbal exchange between the radar controller at Anchorage Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC) and the accident flight as it maneuvered for the area navigation (RNAV) runway 11 approach to the airport: At 1806:07 ARTCC: "Medevac three lima yankee cross CEMGA at or above seven-thousand you're cleared for the RNAV runway 11 approach to Kake Airport." At 1806:11 N13LY: "CEMGA at or above seven-thousand cleared for the RNAV 11 for King Air three lima yankee." At 1807:43 N13LY: "Three lima yankee CEMGA inbound." At 1807:45 ARTCC: "Three lima yankee roger change to advisory frequency approved." At 1807:48 N13LY: "OK we're switching good day." There were no further communications with the accident flight. A preliminary review of archived FAA radar data revealed that the accident airplane crossed the CEMGA waypoint on the RNAV runway 11 approach at an altitude of about 7,000 ft above mean sea level (msl), then turned northeast and crossed the ZOLKO initial approach fix about 5,000 ft msl. The airplane then initiated a gradual descent and continued northeast toward the JOJOE intermediate fix. About 1810, while the flight was between ZOLKO and JOJOE, the airplane entered a right turn toward a southerly heading and began a rapid descent, losing about 2,575 ft of altitude in 14 seconds. The last radar data point was at 1810:36 when the airplane was at 1,300 ft msl and heading 143° with a ground speed of 174 knots.During a telephone conversation with the NTSB investigator-in-charge, a witness located at PAFE reported that she had driven up early to meet the airplane and observed that the pilot controlled runway lighting system illuminated about 1809. After about 10 minutes, when the airplane failed to arrive, she contacted Guardian Flight to inquire about the overdue airplane. An alert notice (ALNOT) was issued by the FAA at 1845, and an extensive search was launched. Search operations were conducted by personnel from the United States Coast Guard, Petersburg Search and Rescue, Alaska State Troopers, Kake Search and Rescue, Alaska Marine Highway Ferries, and numerous Good Samaritans. On January 30, airplane debris was located about 22 miles west of Kake floating on the surface of the water near Point Gardner in Chatham Strait. The airplane was equipped with a cockpit voice recorder (CVR) and a Dukane DK-100 underwater beacon. Search and recovery efforts continue, and a detailed wreckage examination and CVR audition is pending following recovery. The closest weather reporting facility is at PAFE, about 20 miles east of the presumed accident site. At 1756, a PAFE aviation routine weather report (METAR) reported wind from 100° at 6 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, light rain, broken clouds at 1,500 ft and 2,500 ft, overcast clouds at 5,500 ft, temperature 36° F, dew point 34° F, and altimeter 29.95 inHG.

Crash of a Cessna 441 Conquest II near Bismarck: 3 killed

Date & Time: Nov 18, 2018 at 2300 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N441CX
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Bismarck - Williston
MSN:
441-0305
YOM:
1982
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
The twin engine airplane departed Bismarck Airport in the evening on an ambulance flight to Williston, North Dakota, carrying a pilot, a paramedic and a nurse. Few minutes after takeoff, while cruising at an altitude of 14,000 feet by night, the airplane apparently broke up in mid-air, dove into the ground and crashed in an open field located about 15-20 miles northwest of Mandan, in the suburb of Bismarck. The aircraft was totally destroyed and debris were found on a wide area. All three occupants have been killed.

Crash of a PZL-Mielec AN-28 in Mezhdurechenskoye: 5 killed

Date & Time: Oct 4, 2017 at 0758 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
UP-A2807
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Almaty - Shymkent
MSN:
1AJ007-14
YOM:
1990
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:
The aircraft departed Almaty Airport at 1835LT on an ambulance mission to Shymkent, carrying two doctors, two pilots and one flight mechanic. Twelve minutes later, the twin engine aircraft crashed in flames near the village of Mezhdurechenskoye located about 25 km northwest of Almaty Airport. The aircraft was totally destroyed by impact forces and post crash fire and all five occupants were killed.

Crash of a Beechcraft LR-2 Hayabusa near Assabu: 4 killed

Date & Time: May 15, 2017 at 1147 LT
Operator:
Registration:
23057
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Sapporo – Hakodate
MSN:
FL-677
YOM:
2009
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
The crew left Sapporo-Okadama Airport at 1123LT bound for Hakodate to evacuate a patient. While descending at an altitude of 3,000 feet in poor weather conditions (low clouds and rain showers), the airplane registered 23057 (JG-3057) disappeared from radar screens after it struck a mountain located near Assabu, about 40 km northwest of Hakodate Airport. All four occupants were killed. The Beechcraft LR-2 Hayabusa is a version of the Super King Air 350.

Crash of a Pilatus PC-12 in Amarillo: 3 killed

Date & Time: Apr 28, 2017 at 2348 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N933DC
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Amarillo – Clovis
MSN:
105
YOM:
1994
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
5866
Captain / Total hours on type:
73.00
Circumstances:
The pilot and two medical crew members departed on an air ambulance flight in night instrument meteorological conditions to pick up a patient. After departure, the local air traffic controller observed the airplane's primary radar target with an incorrect transponder code in a right turn and climbing through 4,400 ft mean sea level (msl), which was 800 ft above ground level (agl). The controller instructed the pilot to reset the transponder to the correct code, and the airplane leveled off between 4,400 ft and 4,600 ft msl for about 30 seconds. The controller then confirmed that the airplane was being tracked on radar with the correct transponder code; the airplane resumed its climb at a rate of about 6,000 ft per minute (fpm) to 6,000 ft msl. The pilot changed frequencies as instructed, then contacted departure control and reported "with you at 6,000 [ft msl]" and the departure controller radar-identified the airplane. About 1 minute later, the departure controller advised the pilot that he was no longer receiving the airplane's transponder; the pilot did not respond, and there were no further recorded transmissions from the pilot. Radar data showed the airplane descending rapidly at a rate that reached 17,000 fpm. Surveillance video from a nearby truck stop recorded lights from the airplane descending at an angle of about 45° followed by an explosion. The airplane impacted a pasture about 1.5 nautical miles south of the airport, and a post impact fire ensued. All major components of the airplane were located within the debris field. Ground scars at the accident site and damage to the airplane indicated that the airplane was in a steep, nose-low and wings-level attitude at the time of impact. The airplane's steep descent and its impact attitude are consistent with a loss of control. An airplane performance study based on radar data and simulations determined that, during the climb to 6,000 ft and about 37 seconds before impact, the airplane achieved a peak pitch angle of about 23°, after which the pitch angle decreased steadily to an estimated -42° at impact. As the pitch angle decreased, the roll angle increased steadily to the left, reaching an estimated -76° at impact. The performance study revealed that the airplane could fly the accident flight trajectory without experiencing an aerodynamic stall. The apparent pitch and roll angles, which represent the attitude a pilot would "feel" the airplane to be in based on his vestibular and kinesthetic perception of the components of the load factor vector in his own body coordinate system, were calculated. The apparent pitch angle ranged from 0° to 15° as the real pitch angle steadily decreased to -42°, and the apparent roll angle ranged from 0° to -4° as the real roll angle increased to -78°. This suggests that even when the airplane was in a steeply banked descent, conditions were present that could have produced a somatogravic illusion of level flight and resulted in spatial disorientation of the pilot. Analysis of the performance study and the airplane's flight track revealed that the pilot executed several non-standard actions during the departure to include: excessive pitch and roll angles, rapid climb, unexpected level-offs, and non-standard ATC communications. In addition to the non-standard actions, the pilot's limited recent flight experience in night IFR conditions, and moderate turbulence would have been conducive to the onset of spatial disorientation. The pilot's failure to set the correct transponder code before departure, his non-standard departure maneuvering, and his apparent confusion regarding his altitude indicate a mental state not at peak acuity, further increasing the chances of spatial disorientation. A post accident examination of the flight control system did not reveal evidence of any preimpact anomalies that would have prevented normal operation. The engine exhibited rotational signatures indicative of engine operation during impact, and an examination did not reveal any preimpact anomalies that would have precluded normal engine operation. The damage to the propeller hub and blades indicated that the propeller was operating under high power in the normal range of operation at time of impact. Review of recorded data recovered from airplane's attitude and heading reference unit did not reveal any faults with the airplane's attitude and heading reference system (AHRS) during the accident flight, and there were no maintenance logbook entries indicating any previous electronic attitude director indicator (EADI) or AHRS malfunctions. Therefore, it is unlikely that erroneous attitude information was displayed on the EADI that could have misled the pilot concerning the actual attitude of the airplane. A light bulb filament analysis of the airplane's central advisory display unit (CADU) revealed that the "autopilot disengage" caution indicator was likely illuminated at impact, and the "autopilot trim" warning indicator was likely not illuminated. A filament analysis of the autopilot mode controller revealed that the "autopilot," "yaw damper," and "altitude hold" indicators were likely not illuminated at impact. The status of the "trim" warning indicator on the autopilot mode controller could not be determined because the filaments of the indicator's bulbs were missing. However, since the CADU's "autopilot trim" warning indicator was likely not illuminated, the mode controller's "trim" warning indicator was also likely not illuminated at impact. Exemplar airplane testing revealed that the "autopilot disengage" caution indicator would only illuminate if the autopilot had been engaged and then disconnected. It would not illuminate if the autopilot was off without being previously engaged nor would it illuminate if the pilot attempted and failed to engage the autopilot by pressing the "autopilot" push button on the mode controller. Since the "autopilot disengage" caution indicator would remain illuminated for 30 seconds after the autopilot was disengaged and was likely illuminated at impact, it is likely that the autopilot had been engaged at some point during the flight and disengaged within 30 seconds of the impact; the pilot was reporting to ATC at 6,000 ft about 30 seconds before impact and then the rapid descent began. The airplane was not equipped with a recording device that would have recorded the operational status of the autopilot, and the investigation could not determine the precise times at which autopilot engagement and disengagement occurred. However, these times can be estimated as follows:
- The pilot likely engaged the autopilot after the airplane climbed through 1,000 ft agl about 46 seconds after takeoff, because this was the recommended minimum autopilot engagement altitude that he was taught.
- According to the airplane performance study, the airplane's acceleration exceeded the autopilot's limit load factor of +1.6 g about 9 seconds before impact. If it was engaged at this time, the autopilot would have automatically disengaged.
- The roll angle data from the performance study were consistent with engagement of the autopilot between two points:
1) about 31 seconds before impact, during climb, when the bank angle, which had stabilized for a few seconds, started to increase again and
2) about 9 seconds before impact, during descent, at which time the autopilot would have automatically disengaged. Since the autopilot would have reduced the bank angle as soon as it was engaged and there is no evidence of the bank angle reducing significantly between these two points, it is likely that the autopilot was engaged closer to the latter point than the former. Engagement of the autopilot shortly before the latter point would have left little time for the autopilot to reduce the bank angle before it would have disengaged automatically due to exceedance of the normal load factor limit. Therefore, it is likely that the pilot engaged the autopilot a few seconds before it automatically disconnected about 9 seconds before impact. The operator reported that the airplane had experienced repeated, unexpected, in-flight autopilot disconnects, and, two days before the accident, the chief pilot recorded a video of the autopilot disconnecting during a flight. Exemplar airplane testing and maintenance information revealed that, during the flight in which the video was recorded, the autopilot's pitch trim adapter likely experienced a momentary loss of power for undetermined reasons, which resulted in the sequence of events observed in the video. It is possible that the autopilot disconnected during the accident flight due to the pitch trim adapter experiencing a loss of power, which would have to have occurred between 30 and 9 seconds before impact. A post accident weather analysis revealed that the airplane was operating in an environment requiring instruments to navigate, but it could not be determined if the airplane was in cloud when the loss of control occurred. The sustained surface wind was from the north at 21 knots with gusts up to 28 knots, and moderate turbulence existed. The presence of the moderate turbulence could have contributed to the controllability of the airplane and the pilot's inability to recognize the airplane's attitude and the autopilot's operational status.
Probable cause:
The pilot's loss of airplane control due to spatial disorientation during the initial climb after takeoff in night instrument meteorological conditions and moderate turbulence.
Final Report:

Crash of a Pilatus PC-12/47 in Kamphaeng Saen: 1 killed

Date & Time: Mar 5, 2017 at 1916 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VT-AVG
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
New Delhi – Calcutta – Bangkok
MSN:
888
YOM:
2008
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The single engine aircraft left New Delhi at 0842LT on an ambulance flight to Bangkok with two pilots and three doctors on board. A refueling stop was completed at Calcutta Airport. At 1903LT, en route to Bangkok-Don Mueang Airport, the crew contacted ATC and requested permission to divert to Kamphaeng Saen Airport for an emergency landing. The permission was granted and the crew started the descent when the aircraft disappeared from radar screens at 1916LT. The burned wreckage was found one hour and thirty minutes later (2048LT) in a wooded area located few km from runway 22L threshold. All five occupants were injured while the aircraft was destroyed. Few hours later, the copilot died from his injuries.

Crash of a Piper PA-31T Cheyenne in Elko: 4 killed

Date & Time: Nov 18, 2016 at 1920 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N779MF
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Elko - Salt Lake City
MSN:
31-7920093
YOM:
1979
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
7050
Aircraft flight hours:
6600
Circumstances:
The airline transport pilot departed in the twin-engine, turbine-powered airplane on an air ambulance flight with two medical crew members and a patient on board in night visual meteorological conditions. According to a witness, during the initial climb, the airplane made a left turn of about 30° from the runway heading, then stopped climbing, made an abrupt left bank, and began to descend. The airplane impacted a parking lot and erupted into flames. In the 2 months before the accident, pilots had notified maintenance personnel three times that the left engine was not producing the same power as the right engine. In response, mechanics had replaced the left engine's bleed valve three times with the final replacement taking place three days before the accident. In addition, about 1 month before the accident, the left engine's fuel control unit was replaced during trouble shooting of an oil leak. Post accident examination revealed that the right engine and propeller displayed more pronounced rotational signatures than the left engine and propeller. This is consistent with the left engine not producing power or being at a low power setting at impact. Further, the abrupt left bank and descent observed by the witness are consistent with a loss of left engine power during initial climb. The extensive fire and impact damage to the airplane precluded determination of the reason for the loss of left engine power.
Probable cause:
A loss of engine power to the left engine for reasons that could not be determined due to the extensive fire and impact damage to the airplane.
Final Report:

Crash of a Learjet 31A in Jakarta

Date & Time: Sep 25, 2016 at 1946 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
PK-JKI
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Yogyakarta – Jakarta
MSN:
31-213
YOM:
2001
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The crew was performing an ambulance flight from Yogyakarta-Adisujipto Airport to Jakarta-Halim Perdanakusuma on behalf of the Indonesian Red Cross (Palang Merah Indonesia). The approach was completed by night and marginal weather conditions. After touchdown on runway 24, the aircraft skidded on the wet runway and after a run of 1,300 meters, it veered to the right and left the pavement. While contacting soft ground, the right main gear was sheared off while the left main gear was partially torn off. The aircraft then hit the ground several times, causing the left wing to be bent. Eventually, the right engine dislodged from his mount. All eight occupants were evacuated safely and there was no fire.