code

TX

Crash of a Cessna 421C Golden Eagle III in Houston

Date & Time: May 6, 2022 at 1418 LT
Operator:
Registration:
XB-FQS
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Houston - McAllen
MSN:
421C-0085
YOM:
1976
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
While taking off from Houston-William P. Hobby Airport, the airplane suffered a loss of engine power. Control was lost and the airplane veered off runway, crossed a grassy area then impacted a pole, lost its left wing and came to rest in a garden. All four occupants evacuated with minor injuries and the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Cessna 208B Grand Caravan in Fulshear: 2 killed

Date & Time: Dec 21, 2021 at 0925 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N1116N
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Houston - Victoria
MSN:
208B-0417
YOM:
1994
Flight number:
MRA685
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The single engine airplane departed Houston-George Bush-Intercontinental Airport at 0910LT on a cargo service to Victoria. Twelve minutes later, while climbing to an altitude of 4,200 feet, the aircraft collided with a paraglider. Out of control, it entered a dive and crashed three minutes later in a field. The aircraft was totally destroyed and the pilot, sole on board was killed, as well as the paraglider.

Crash of a McDonnell Douglas MD-87 in Houston

Date & Time: Oct 19, 2021 at 1000 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N987AK
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Houston - Boston
MSN:
49404/1430
YOM:
1987
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
18
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
During the takeoff roll from runway 36 at Houston-Executive (Brookshire) Airport, the pilots rejected takeoff and the aircraft was unable to stop within the remaining distance. It overran, lost its undercarriage and came to rest 500 metres past the runway in an open field, bursting into flames. All 21 occupants evacuated safely, among them two were slightly injured. The aircraft was totally destroyed by a post crash fire. It was reported by the NTSB that the aircraft did not fly for a period of 10 months, that braking marks were found on a distance of 1,200 feet and that light smoke was coming out from both engines during the takeoff roll.

Crash of a Cessna 340A in Tatum: 1 killed

Date & Time: Apr 19, 2021 at 1346 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N801EC
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Henderson - Henderson
MSN:
340A-0312
YOM:
1977
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
On April 19, 2021, about 1346 central daylight time, a Cessna 340A airplane, N801EC, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Tatum, Texas. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 flight test. According to information provided by a Fixed Base Operator (FBO) at the East Texas Regional Airport (GGG), the intention of the flight was to do a functional test of a newly upgraded autopilot system. Automatic Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast (ADS-B) data showed that the airplane took off from runway 13 at GGG about 1340. According to preliminary Air Traffic Control (ATC) information provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the controller cleared the pilot to operate under Visual Flight Rules (VFR) to the east of the airport and to remain in class C airspace. Communications between ground control, tower control, and the pilot were normal during the ground taxi, takeoff, and climb-out. Six minutes after takeoff, radio and radar communications were lost and controllers initiated ALNOT procedures. There were no radio distress calls heard from the pilot. After takeoff, ADS-B data showed the airplane in a steady climb to the east of GGG. The airplane climbed to an altitude of 2,750 ft mean sea level (msl) and then descended to 2,675 ft msl. There were no other data points recorded. The accident site was located directly east, about ¾ mile from the last recorded data point. Groundspeeds and headings were consistent throughout the climb, with no abrupt deviations. There were no eyewitnesses to the accident; however, a local resident located about 1 mile from the accident site reported that he was inside his residence when he heard and felt a “boom” that shook the windows. He immediately saw black smoke rise, found the wreckage, and called 911. The accident site was located at an elevation of 361 ft msl. The airplane impacted the vegetated terrain in a nose-down, vertical flight attitude. The fuselage and cabin were embedded into the ground and were mostly consumed from a post-impact fire. The empennage was folded forward over the cabin area. Both left and right wings showed leading edge crushing along their respective spans. Portions of both wings were fire damaged. Both left and right engine nacelles were separated from the wings and the engine and propeller assemblies were embedded in 3-foot-deep craters.

Crash of a Cessna 551 Citation II/SP in Lufkin

Date & Time: Dec 2, 2020 at 0842 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N48DK
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Austin - Lufkin
MSN:
551-0095
YOM:
1978
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On December 2, 2020, about 0843 central standard time, a Cessna 551, N48DK, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Lufkin, Texas. The airline transport pilot sustained minor injuries and 2 passengers were not injured. The airplane was being operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 corporate flight. The pilot stated that after an uneventful Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) flight from Austin, Texas, he entered the RNAV 16 approach to runway 16 at the Angelina County Airport (LFK), Lufkin, Texas. His intention was a full stop landing. After breaking out of the clouds during the approach, he cancelled his flight plan and landed on runway 16 which was wet, and it was raining. During the landing, the pilot cycled the anti-skid brake system about 2-3 times, and then the braking did not respond while the airplane slowed to about 20 knots. The pilot thought that the airplane’s anti-skid stopped working and the airplane may have hydroplaned. The airplane exited the runway onto wet grass, went through an airport perimeter fence, crossed a roadway, and came to rest in a cow pasture. The pilot and both passengers evacuated the airplane after coming to a stop. On scene inspection of the airplane revealed that the nose and main landing gear collapsed after departing the runway, and both wings had structural damage to their respective spars.

Crash of a Piper PA-46-310P Malibu in Hilltop Lakes: 4 killed

Date & Time: Sep 20, 2020 at 1049 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N236KM
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Horseshoe Bay – Natchitoches
MSN:
46-8508014
YOM:
1985
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
On September 20, 2020, about 1050 central daylight time (CDT), a Piper PA-46-310, N236KM, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Hilltop Lakes, Texas. The commercial pilot and 3 passengers sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight. While in cruise flight at 19,000 ft mean sea level (MSL), the pilot declared an emergency to air traffic control (ATC) and stated that the airplane had lost engine power and that he needed to divert. The pilot elected to divert to Hilltop Lakes Airport (0TE4), which was about 5 miles south of his position. Archived FAA automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) data revealed that when the airplane was about 5 miles west of 0TE4, a descent was initiated from 19,000 ft and the airplane proceeded directly to, and circled around, the airport while descending. ADS-B data was lost about 3 miles northeast of the airport, as the airplane descended below the floor of the ADS-B reception capability. Commercially available flight track data, which aggregates and georeferences FAA data sources, continued to receive aircraft data as the airplane turned to a final approach segment. The last data point showed the airplane about 1 mile north of the approach end of runway 15 at 0TE4 at an altitude of 1,250 ft, 169 knots ground speed and on a ground track of 145°. Witnesses located about ¼ mile south of the end of runway 15 reported seeing what they described as the airplane taking off, before noticing the propeller was not turning. They stated they saw the airplane in a left bank just prior to the nose dropping and the airplane impacting the ground in a near vertical attitude. The airplane came to rest along a road about 200 ft south of the airport property. The airplane impacted the terrain in a nose low, near vertical attitude and sustained substantial damage to fuselage and both wings. The airplane was equipped with a Pratt & Whitney PT6A turboprop engine that had been installed in accordance with Supplemental Type Certificate ST00541SE.

Crash of a Piper PA-46-350P Malibu Mirage in Jacksonville

Date & Time: Sep 16, 2020 at 1340 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N972DD
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Jacksonville - Jacksonville
MSN:
46-36637
YOM:
2014
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total hours on type:
1141.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
534
Copilot / Total hours on type:
9
Aircraft flight hours:
629
Circumstances:
The instructor pilot reported that while practicing an engine-out landing in the traffic pattern, the pilot-rated student overshot the turn from base leg to final rolling out to the right of the runway centerline. The student pilot attempted to turn back toward the runway and then saw that the airplane’s airspeed was rapidly decreasing. The instructor reported that when he realized the severity of the situation it was too late to do anything. The student attempted to add power for a go-around but was unable to recover. The airplane stalled about 10 ft above the ground, impacted the ground right of the runway, and skidded onto the runway where it came to rest. Both wings and the forward fuselage were substantially damaged. Both pilots stated there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.
Probable cause:
The student pilot’s failure to maintain control of the airplane during the landing approach and the exceedance of the airplane’s critical angle of attack at low altitude resulting in an aerodynamic stall. Contributing was the instructor pilot’s failure to adequately monitor the student pilot’s actions during the approach.
Final Report:

Crash of a Pilatus PC-12/47 in Mesquite

Date & Time: Apr 23, 2020 at 1600 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N477SS
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Fort Worth - Mesquite
MSN:
813
YOM:
2007
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On April 23, 2020, about 1600 central daylight time, a Pilatus PC-12 airplane, N477SS, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Mesquite, Texas. The pilot received
serious injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations 91 cross-country flight. Preliminary reports indicate the pilot reported to air traffic control that he was losing engine power. The pilot then said he was going to divert to Rockwall (airport) and accepted vectors to the airport. The pilot then reported the loss of engine power had stabilized, so he wanted to return to DFW (Dallas-Fort Worth International airport). A few moments later the pilot reported that he was losing engine power and he needed to go back to Rockwall. The controller reported that the Mesquite airport (HQZ) was at the pilot's 11 o'clock position and about 3 miles and gave a heading. The pilot reported that he was going to perform a 360° turn to set-up for a left base for the Mesquite Airport. The airplane impacted terrain in a muddy field, short of the airport. The airplane's wings separated in the accident and a post-crash fire developed near the wings.

Crash of a Beechcraft B200 Super King near Coleman: 3 killed

Date & Time: Feb 20, 2020 at 0600 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N860J
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Abilene – Harlingen
MSN:
BB-1067
YOM:
1982
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
5300
Circumstances:
On February 20, 2020, about 0600 central standard time, a Beechcraft B200 airplane, N860J, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Lake Coleman, Texas. The pilot and two passengers were fatally injured. The flight was conducted as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. A review of air traffic control communications revealed that the airplane was cleared for takeoff from Runway 35L at Abilene Regional Airport (ABI), Texas. Shortly after, the pilot was instructed to climb to 12,000 ft mean sea level (msl), then cleared to climb to 23,000 ft msl. The pilot reported to the controller that they encountered freezing drizzle and light rime icing during the climb from 6500 ft to 8,000 ft msl. As the airplane climbed through 11,600 ft msl, the pilot reported that they were having an issue with faulty deicing equipment and needed to return to the airport. The controller instructed the pilot to descend to 11,000 ft msl and cleared them direct to the ABI. The controller then issued a descent to 7,000 ft and asked if there was an emergency. The pilot stated that they “blew a breaker” when they encountered icing conditions, and that it was not resetting. The controller then instructed the pilot to descend to 5,000 ft and to expect the ILS Runway 35R approach. The controller gave the pilot a heading of 310°. Shortly afterwards the controller asked the pilot if they were turning to the assigned heading; the pilot responded that they were having issues with faulty instruments. When the controller asked the aircraft to report their altitude, the pilot reported that they were at 4,700 ft. The controller then instructed the pilot to maintain 5,000 ft. The pilot responded he was “pulling up”. There was no further communication with the pilot. Review of the airplane’s radar track showed the airplane’s departure from ABI and the subsequent turn and southeast track towards its destination. The track appeared as a straight line before a right turn was observed. The turn radius decreased before the flight track ended.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft B60 Duke in Big Spring

Date & Time: Jan 29, 2020 at 1710 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N50JR
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Abilene – Midland
MSN:
P-303
YOM:
1974
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
25000
Captain / Total hours on type:
7.00
Circumstances:
The pilot was conducting a cross-country flight at a cruise altitude of 10,500 ft mean sea level when the left engine lost all power. He secured the engine and elected to continue to his destination. Shortly thereafter, the right engine lost all power. After selecting an airport for a forced landing, he overflew the runway and entered the pattern. The pilot stated that on short final, after extending the landing gear, "the plane quit flying and the airspeed went to nothing." The airplane landed 200 to 300 yards short of the runway threshold, resulting in substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. During a postaccident examination, only tablespoons of fuel were drained from the left tank. Due to the position of the airplane, the right tank could not be drained; however, when power was applied to the airplane, both fuel quantity gauges indicated empty fuel tanks. Neither fuel tank was breached during the accident, and there was no discoloration present on either of the wings or engine nacelles to indicate a fuel leak; therefore, the loss of engine power is consistent with fuel exhaustion.
Probable cause:
A total loss of engine power in both engines due to fuel exhaustion, which resulted in a landing short of the runway.
Final Report: