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Crash of a Socata TBM-700 in Brasília

Date & Time: Jan 31, 2022 at 0930 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
PP-INQ
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Bahia - Brasília
MSN:
558
YOM:
2010
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
After landing at Brasília-Nelson Piquet Airport, the single engine airplane went out of control and veered off runway. It went down into a ravine and came to rest into trees. All five occupants evacuated safely while the aircraft was destroyed. The pilot reported he encountered strong winds upon landing.

Crash of a Socata TBM-700 near Urbana: 1 killed

Date & Time: Aug 20, 2021 at 1440 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N700DT
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Port Clinton – Cincinnati
MSN:
134
YOM:
1998
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
On August 20, 2021, about 1440 eastern daylight time, a Socata TBM 700A airplane, N700DT, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Urbana, Ohio. The pilot sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Preliminary air traffic control information revealed the airplane was en route from the Erie Ottawa Airport (PCW), Port Clinton, Ohio, to the Cincinnati Municipal Airport (LUK), Cincinnati, Ohio. The airplane departed runway 9 at PCW and climbed to flight level 200 before beginning to descend. The airplane was southbound, descending to 12,000 ft mean sea level (msl), and established communications with the assigned terminal radar approach control controller. The controller cleared the pilot to descent to 10,000 ft msl and proceed direct to LUK. While descending through 12,100 ft msl, the airplane entered a left turn. The controller observed the left turn and asked the pilot if everything was alright; there was no response from the pilot. Radar contact was subsequently lost with the airplane. The controller’s further attempts to establish communications were unsuccessful. A witness, located about 2 miles south of the accident location, stated that he observed the airplane at a high altitude in a nose-dive descent toward the terrain. He reported the airplane was not turning or spinning; it was headed straight down. The witness observed no signs of distress, such as smoke, fire, or parts coming off the airplane, and he stated the airplane’s engine was at full throttle. The witness lost sight of the airplane as it descended behind some trees. The accident site was located 1.3 miles northwest of the last radar contact. The accident site showed the airplane impacted trees, two powerlines, and the terrain in a left-wing low attitude. The initial ground scar, located in a residential yard, contained separated components of the left wing. The airplane crossed a highway, struck trees and a ditch, and then continued into mature potato and soybean fields. The airplane wreckage was scattered at a distance of about 2,050 ft along a measured magnetic heading of 275°. According to acquaintances of the pilot, the pilot purchased the airplane about 9 days before the accident. Following the purchase, the pilot and a flight instructor completed several hours of ground school and 15.5 hours of dual instruction in the airplane.

Crash of a Socata TBM-700 in Lansing: 5 killed

Date & Time: Oct 3, 2019 at 0858 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N700AQ
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Indianapolis - Lansing
MSN:
252
YOM:
2003
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
1404
Captain / Total hours on type:
76.00
Aircraft flight hours:
3550
Circumstances:
On October 3, 2019, about 0858 eastern daylight time, a Socata TBM 700 airplane, N700AQ, collided with terrain while on an instrument approach to Capital Region International Airport (LAN), Lansing, Michigan. The commercial pilot, pilot-rated passenger, and 3 passengers were fatally injured. The remaining passenger sustained serious injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was owned by N700AQ LLC and operated under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 on an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan. Day instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site. The cross-country business flight departed Indy South Greenwood Airport (HFY), Greenwood, Indiana, at 0800. According to automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) data that was transmitted from the airplane to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) air traffic control (ATC), the flight departed runway 19 at HFY and turned northeast toward MAREO intersection where it turned north toward LAN. The airplane subsequently climbed to flight level 190 (19,000 ft pressure altitude). At 0834:24, the flight entered a cruise descent from flight level 190 and was progressively cleared down to 3,000 ft mean sea level (msl). According to ATC communications, the pilot was provided radar vectors to join the localizer for the instrument landing system (ILS) runway 10R approach at LAN. At 0853:03, the approach controller stated, "TBM zero alpha quebec, five miles from FAMLI, turn right, ah, right heading zero seven zero, maintain three thousand until established on the localizer, cleared the ILS one zero right." The pilot responded, "Zero seven zero, ah, we're cleared for the ILS ten right into, ah, Lansing." The ADS-B data indicated the airplane entered a right turn and joined the localizer inbound. At 0854:27, the approach controller stated, "TBM zero alpha quebec, contact Lansing tower one one niner point niner, good day." The pilot responded, "One nineteen ninety, seven hundred alpha quebec." At 0855:29, the airplane crossed over the outer marker (FAMLI) at 2,302 ft msl and continued to descend on the glideslope while established inbound on the localizer toward runway 10R. The airplane had a calculated true airspeed of 168 knots when it crossed over the outer marker. Between 0855:29 and 0857:45, the airplane continued to decelerate from 168 knots to 64 knots. At 0854:36, the pilot established contact with the Lansing tower controller and reported being established on the ILS Runway 10R instrument approach. At 0854:39, the tower controller stated, "Seven zero zero alpha quebec, Lansing, ah, tower, the winds are calm, one zero right cleared to land." The pilot responded, "Cleared to land, ah, ten right, seven hundred alpha quebec." There were no additional communications received from the pilot. At 0858:13, the tower controller attempted to contact the pilot over the tower frequency without success. A passenger was seriously injured and all five other occupants were killed.

Crash of a Socata TBM-700 in Evanston: 2 killed

Date & Time: Feb 18, 2018 at 1505 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N700VX
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Tulsa – Evanston
MSN:
118
YOM:
1997
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
4154
Captain / Total hours on type:
100.00
Aircraft flight hours:
3966
Circumstances:
The commercial pilot was conducting an instrument approach following a 3.5-hour cross-country instrument flight rules (IFR) flight in a single-engine turboprop airplane. About 1.6 miles from the runway threshold, the airplane began a climb consistent with the published missed approach procedure; however, rather than completing the slight left climbing turn toward the designated holding point, the airplane continued in an approximate 270° left turn, during which the airplane's altitude varied, before entering a descending right turn and impacting terrain. Tree and ground impact signatures were consistent with a 60° nose-low attitude at the time of impact. No distress calls were received or recorded from the accident flight. A postimpact fire consumed a majority of the cockpit and fuselage. Weather information for the time of the accident revealed that the pilot was operating in IFR to low IFR conditions with gusting surface winds, light to heavy snow, mist, cloud ceilings between 700 and 1,400 ft above ground level with clouds extending through 18,500 ft, and the potential for low-level wind shear and clear air turbulence. The area of the accident site was under AIRMETs for IFR conditions, mountain obscuration, moderate icing below 20,000 ft, and moderate turbulence below 18,000 ft. In addition, a winter storm warning was issued about 6 hours before the flight departed. Although the pilot received a weather briefing about 17 hours before the accident, there was no indication that he obtained updated weather information before departure or during the accident flight. Examination of the airframe and engine did not reveal any preimpact anomalies that would have precluded normal operation; however, the extent of the fire damage precluded examination of the avionics system. The airplane was equipped with standby flight instruments. An acquaintance of the pilot reported that the pilot had experienced an avionics malfunction several months before the accident during which the airplane's flight display went blank while flying an instrument approach. During that occurrence, the pilot used ForeFlight on his iPad to maneuver back to the northeast and fly the approach again using his own navigation. During the accident flight, the airplane appeared to go missed approach, but rather than fly the published missed approach procedure, the airplane also turned left towards to northeast. However, it could not be determined if the pilot's actions were an attempt to fly the approach using his own navigation or if he was experiencing spatial disorientation. The restricted visibility and turbulence present at the time of the accident provided conditions conducive to the development of spatial disorientation. Additionally, the airplane's turning flight track and steep descent profile are consistent with the known effects of spatial disorientation.
Probable cause:
The pilot's loss of control due to spatial disorientation.
Final Report: