Crash of a Beechcraft 65-A90 King Air in Dillingham: 11 killed

Date & Time: Jun 21, 2019 at 1820 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N256TA
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Dillingham - Dillingham
MSN:
LJ-256
YOM:
1967
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
10
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
11
Circumstances:
The twin engine airplane was engaged in a sunset skydiving flight, carrying a pilot and 10 skydivers. While taking off from runway 08/26, the aircraft went out of control and crashed in flames along the perimeter fence. The aircraft was totally destroyed by impact forces and a post-crash fire and all 11 occupants were killed.

Crash of a Beechcraft C90B King Air in Ipumirim: 1 killed

Date & Time: Sep 15, 2018 at 1215 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
PR-RFB
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Florianópolis – Chapecó
MSN:
LJ-1546
YOM:
1999
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
En route from Florianópolis to Chapecó, the twin engine aircraft went out of control and crashed in unknown circumstances in a wooded area located in Ipumirim, some 50 km east of Chapecó Airport. The aircraft was destroyed by impact forces and a post crash fire and the pilot, sole occupant, was killed.

Crash of a Beechcraft C90GTi King Air in Campo de Marte: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jul 29, 2018 at 1810 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
PP-SZN
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Videira – Campo de Marte
MSN:
LJ-1910
YOM:
2008
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
While approaching Campo de Marte Airport by night on a flight from Videira, the crew encountered technical problems with the gear and completed two low passes over the runway to confirm the problem. During a third approach, the twin engine airplane banked left then overturned and crashed inverted in a huge explosion about 100 meters to the left of the runway. Six occupants were injured while one of the pilot was killed.

Crash of a Beechcraft C90A King Air in Mumbai: 5 killed

Date & Time: Jun 28, 2018 at 1315 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VT-UPZ
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Juhu - Juhu
MSN:
LJ-1400
YOM:
1995
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:
Following technical maintenance, a test flight was scheduled with two engineers and two pilots. The twin engine airplane departed Mumbai-Juhu Airport and the crew completed several manoeuvres over the city before returning. On approach in heavy rain falls, the aircraft went out of control and crashed in flames at the bottom of a building under construction located in the Ghatkopar West district, some 3 km east from Mumbai Intl Airport. The aircraft was completely destroyed by impact forces and a post crash fire and all four occupants were killed as well as one person on the ground.

Crash of a Beechcraft C90 King Air near Sanford: 3 killed

Date & Time: Dec 8, 2017 at 1115 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N19LW
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Sanford - Sanford
MSN:
LJ-991
YOM:
1981
Flight number:
CONN900
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
The aircraft was destroyed when it impacted the waters of Lake Harney, near Geneva, Florida. The airplane was registered to Planemarketing LLC, Vero Beach, Florida, and operated by L3 Airline Academy as CONN900 as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. The Flight Instructor and two commercial pilots receiving instruction were fatally injured. Instrument and visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight, which originated from Sanford, Florida, about 0753. Review of preliminary information provided by the Federal Aviation Administration revealed that following an uneventful flight to Milledgeville, Georgia, the flight returned to the Orlando Sanford International Airport (SFB) and conducted a practice instrument approach to runway 09. After the flight completed the instrument approach, the active runway was changed to 27R and Air Traffic Control (ATC) controllers vectored the flight for a practice ILS Runway 27R instrument approach. About 2 minutes after the flight was given a vector to intercept the localizer and cleared for the approach, the controller issued a low altitude alert and advised the flight to climb to 1,600 feet. Following a second low altitude alert with instructions to immediately climb to 1,600 feet, the flight responded that "I am sir, I am." Shortly after, radar and radio communication with the accident airplane was lost. A witness, who was located on a boat near the north end of Lake Harney reported hearing a low flying airplane approach his position at a low altitude. The witness stated that he could not see the airplane initially due to low clouds and light ground fog, however, he observed the airplane below the cloud ceiling at 250 to 300 feet above ground level, and then climb rapidly. The witness further stated that they were looking in the general direction of the engine noise when they observed the airplane dive vertically into the lake south of their position.

Crash of a Beechcraft C90 King Air in Rockford

Date & Time: Dec 5, 2017 at 1802 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N500KR
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Kissimmee - Rockford
MSN:
LJ-708
YOM:
1977
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2500
Aircraft flight hours:
9856
Circumstances:
The private pilot departed on a cross-country flight in his high-performance, turbine-powered airplane with full tanks of fuel. He landed and had the airplane serviced with 150 gallons of fuel. He subsequently departed on the return flight. As the airplane approached the destination airport, the pilot asked for priority handling and reported that the airplane "lost a transfer pump and had a little less fuel than he thought," and he did not want to come in with a single engine. When asked if he needed assistance, he replied "negative." The pilot was cleared to perform a visual approach to runway 19 during night conditions. As the airplane approached the airport, the pilot requested the runway lights for runway 25 be turned on and reported that the airplane lost engine power in one engine. The controller advised that the lights on runway 25 were being turned on and issued a landing clearance. The airplane impacted terrain before the threshold for runway 25. During examination of the recovered wreckage, flight control continuity was established. No useable amount of fuel was found in any of the airplane's fuel tanks; however, fuel was observed in the fuel lines. All transfer pumps and boost pumps were operational. The engine-driven fuel pumps on both engines contained fuel in their respective fuel filter bowls. Both pumps were able to rotate when their input shafts were manipulated by hand. Disassembly of both pumps revealed that their inlet filters were free of obstructions. Bearing surfaces in both pumps exhibited pitting consistent with pump operation with inadequate fuel lubrication and fuel not reaching the pump. The examination revealed no evidence of airframe or engine preimpact malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane. Performance calculations using a flight planning method described in the airplane flight manual indicated that the airplane could have made the return flight with about 18 gallons (119 lbs) of fuel remaining. However, performance calculations using a fuel burn simulation method developed from the fuel burn and data from the airplane flight manual indicated that the airplane would have run out of fuel on approach. Regulations require that a flight depart with enough fuel to fly to the first point of intended landing and, assuming normal cruising speed, at night, to fly after that for at least 45 minutes. The calculated 45-minute night reserves required about 56 gallons (366 lbs) of fuel using a maximum recommended cruise power setting or about 37.8 gallons (246 lbs) of fuel using a maximum range power setting. Regardless of the flight planning method he could have used, the pilot did not depart on the accident flight with the required fuel reserves and exhausted all useable fuel while on approach to the destination. The airplane was owned by Edward B. Noakes III.
Probable cause:
The pilot's inadequate preflight planning and his decision to depart without the required fuel reserve, which resulted in fuel exhaustion during a night approach and subsequent loss of engine power.
Final Report: