code

WI

Crash of a Cessna 421C Golden Eagle III in Catawba: 6 killed

Date & Time: Jul 1, 2017 at 0153 LT
Registration:
N2655B
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Waukegan – Winnipeg
MSN:
421C-0698
YOM:
1979
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Captain / Total flying hours:
2335
Captain / Total hours on type:
70.00
Circumstances:
The commercial pilot of the multi-engine airplane was conducting an instrument flight rules cross-country flight at night. The pilot checked in with air traffic control at a cruise altitude about 10,000 ft mean sea level (msl). About 31 minutes later, the pilot reported that he saw lightning off the airplane's left wing. The controller advised the pilot that the weather appeared to be about 35 to 40 miles away and that the airplane should be well clear of it. The pilot responded to the controller that he had onboard weather radar and agreed that they would fly clear of the weather. There were no further communications from the pilot. About 4 minutes later, radar information showed the airplane at 10,400 ft msl. About 1 minute later, radar showed the airplane in a descending right turn at 9,400 ft. Radar contact was lost shortly thereafter. The distribution of the wreckage, which was scattered in an area with about a 1/4-mile radius, was consistent with an in-flight breakup. The left horizontal stabilizer and significant portions of both left and right elevators and their respective trim tabs were not found. Of the available components for examination, no pre-impact airframe structural anomalies were found. Examination of the engines and turbochargers did not reveal any pre-impact anomalies. Examination of the propellers showed evidence of rotation at impact and no pre-impact anomalies. Review of weather information indicated that no convection or thunderstorms were coincident with or near the airplane's route of flight, and the nearest convective activity was located about 25 miles west of the accident site. Autopsy and toxicology testing revealed no evidence of pilot impairment or incapacitation. Given the lack of radar information after the airplane passed through 9,400 ft, it is likely that it entered a rapid descent during which it exceeded its design stress limitations, which resulted in the in-flight breakup; however, based on the available information, the event that precipitated the descent and loss of control could not be determined.
Probable cause:
A loss of control and subsequent in-flight breakup for reasons that could not be determined
based on the available information.
Final Report:

Crash of a Socata TBM-700 in Milwaukee: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jul 29, 2015 at 1810 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N425KJ
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Beverly - Milwaukee
MSN:
518
YOM:
2009
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
1875
Captain / Total hours on type:
721.00
Aircraft flight hours:
656
Circumstances:
The airline transport pilot was landing at the destination airport after a cross-country flight in visual meteorological conditions. The tower controller stated that the airplane's landing gear appeared to be extended during final approach and that the airplane landed within the runway's touchdown zone. The tower controller stated that, although the airplane made a normal landing, he heard a squealing noise that continued longer than what he believed was typical. The pilot subsequently transmitted "go-around." The tower controller acknowledged the go-around and cleared the pilot to enter a left traffic pattern. The tower controller stated that he heard the engine speed accelerate while the airplane maintained a level attitude over the runway until it passed midfield. He then saw the airplane pitch up and enter a climbing left turn. The tower controller stated that the airplane appeared to enter an aerodynamic stall before it descended into terrain in a left-wing-down attitude. Another witness reported that he saw the airplane, with its landing gear extended, in a steep left turn before it descended rapidly into terrain. A postaccident examination did not reveal any evidence of flight control, landing gear, or engine malfunction. An examination of the runway revealed numerous propeller slash marks that began about 215 ft past the runway's touchdown zone; however, there was no evidence that any portion of the airframe had impacted the runway during the landing. Additionally, measurement of the landing gear actuators confirmed that all three landing gear were fully extended at the accident site. Therefore, the pilot likely did not adequately control the airplane's pitch during the landing, which allowed the propeller to contact the runway. Due to the propeller strikes, the propeller was likely damaged and unable to provide adequate thrust during the go-around. Further, based on the witness accounts, the pilot likely did not maintain adequate airspeed during the climbing left turn, which resulted in the airplane exceeding its critical angle of attack and experiencing an aerodynamic stall at a low altitude.
Probable cause:
The pilot's improper pitch control during the landing, which resulted in the propeller striking the runway, and his failure to maintain adequate airspeed during the subsequent go-around, which resulted in the airplane exceeding its critical angle of attack and experiencing an aerodynamic stall at a low altitude.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft B90 King Air in Sturtevant

Date & Time: Oct 22, 2012 at 1830 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N821DA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Jackson - Sturtevant
MSN:
LJ-406
YOM:
1968
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2331
Captain / Total hours on type:
1425.00
Aircraft flight hours:
12637
Circumstances:
The aircraft collided with a fence and a ditch when it overran runway 8R (2,272 feet by 38 feet, asphalt) while landing at the Sylvania Airport (C89), Sturtevant, Wisconsin. The commercial pilot was not injured and his passenger received minor injuries. The airplane sustained damage to its fuselage and both wings. The airplane was registered to Direct Action Aviation LLC, and was operated by Skydive Midwest. The accident flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Jackson County Airport-Reynolds Field (JXN), Jackson, Michigan, about 1800. The pilot reported that the landing approach was normal and when the airplane crossed the runway threshold it floated and he pulled the engine power levers to the stops. He stated that although he did not remember the airplane bouncing, his passenger told him that it had. He pulled the power levers to reverse, but there was no immediate reverse thrust. He applied brakes and felt the airplane accelerate. He recognized that he would not be able to stop the airplane on the remaining runway and attempted to steer it to the north. The airplane left the runway, impacted two ditches and came to rest on a highway. The pilot stated that he should have recognized that braking action would be significantly reduced with the possibility of hydroplaning, that pulling the power levers to the stops before touchdown induced a lag in realization of reverse thrust, and that he should have executed a go-around when the airplane floated before landing. The pilot reported no mechanical failures or malfunctions of the airplane. At 1853, weather conditions reported at the Kenosha regional Airport (ENW), located 6 miles south of the accident site, included heavy rain.
Probable cause:
The pilot's decision to continue the landing after touching down long and on a wet runway that reduced the airplane’s braking capability, which resulted in an overrun.
Final Report:

Crash of a Socata TBM-850 in Racine: 1 killed

Date & Time: Sep 5, 2011 at 1830 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N850SY
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Waukegan - Milwaukee
MSN:
546
YOM:
2010
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
On a flight from Waukegan, Illinois, to Milwaukee-General Billy Mitchell Airport, Wisconsin, pilot informed ATC about engine problems and elected to divert to Racine-Batten International Airport. On final approach, single engine aircraft stalled and crashed 2,5 miles short of runway. Pilot was killed.

Crash of a Raytheon 390 Premier I in Oshkosh

Date & Time: Jul 27, 2010 at 1816 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N6JR
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Detroit - Oshkosh
MSN:
RB-161
YOM:
2007
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
9095
Captain / Total hours on type:
1406.00
Aircraft flight hours:
1265
Aircraft flight cycles:
930
Circumstances:
The accident occurred during the Experimental Aircraft Association’s Airventure 2010 fly-in convention. Because of the high density of aircraft operations during the fly-in, the Federal Aviation Administration implemented special air traffic control procedures to accommodate traffic demand and maximize runway capacity. Arriving aircraft were issued landing instructions and clearances by a tower controller using a specified tower radio frequency. Departing aircraft were handled by another team of controllers operating on a separate radio frequency that was associated with a mobile operations unit located near the runway. Air traffic control data indicated that the accident airplane established contact with the tower controller and entered a left traffic pattern for runway 18R. As the accident airplane was turning from downwind to base leg, the controller handling departures cleared a Piper Cub for an immediate takeoff and angled departure (a procedure used by slower aircraft to clear the runway immediately after liftoff by turning across the runway edge). The accident pilot was not monitoring the departure frequency, and, therefore, he did not hear the radio transmissions indicating that the departing Piper Cub was going to offset to the left of the runway after liftoff. The accident pilot reported that, while on base leg, he became concerned that his descent path to the runway would conflict with the Piper Cub that was on takeoff roll. He stated that he overshot the runway centerline during his turn from base to final, and, when he completed the turn, his airplane was offset to the right of the runway. The pilot stated that, at this point, he decided not to land because of a perceived conflict with the departing Piper Cub that was ahead and to the left of his position. The pilot reported that he initiated a go-around, increasing engine power slightly, but not to takeoff power, as he looked for additional traffic to avoid. He estimated that he advanced the throttle levers "probably a third of the way to the stop," and, as he looked for traffic, the stall warning stick-shaker and stick-pusher systems activated almost simultaneously as the right wing stalled. The airplane subsequently collided with terrain in a nose down, right wing low attitude. A postaccident review of available air traffic control communications, amateur video of the accident sequence, controller and witness statements, and position data recovered from the accident airplane indicated that the Piper Cub was already airborne, had turned left, and was clear of runway 18R when the accident airplane turned from base to final. The postaccident examination did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane. The airplane flight manual states that, in the event of a go-around, the pilot should first advance engine thrust to takeoff power and then establish Vref (reference landing approach speed). The pilot's decision not to select takeoff power during the go-around directly contributed to the development of the aerodynamic stall at a low altitude.
Probable cause:
The pilot's decision not to advance the engines to takeoff power during the go-around, as stipulated by the airplane flight manual, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall at a low altitude.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 402B in Madison

Date & Time: Dec 16, 2008 at 2252 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N4504B
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Appleton - Milwaukee
MSN:
402-1370
YOM:
1978
Flight number:
FRG1531
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2069
Captain / Total hours on type:
274.00
Aircraft flight hours:
12805
Circumstances:
The on-demand cargo flight departed for the destination airport and was delayed en route due to repetitive destination airport closures. The closures were the result of snow-contaminated runways. The pilot then diverted to an alternate airport due to concerns about remaining fuel reserves. The airplane experienced a loss of engine power during an instrument approach at the alternate airport and impacted the ground about 200 yards short of the landing runway. A postaccident inspection of the airplane revealed no usable fuel on board.
Probable cause:
The pilot’s improper fuel management, which resulted in a loss of engine power during an instrument landing due to fuel exhaustion.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 550 Citation II in Milwaukee: 6 killed

Date & Time: Jun 4, 2007 at 1600 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N550BP
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Milwaukee - Detroit
MSN:
550-0246
YOM:
1981
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Captain / Total flying hours:
14000
Aircraft flight hours:
4402
Circumstances:
The aircraft was making an ambulance flight from Milwaukee-General Billy Mitchell airport to Detroit-Willow Run airport, Michigan. Five minutes after take off, the crew issued a distress call and the plane dropped off radar screens just after the pilot requested to return to airport. The twin engine aircraft crashed in the Michigan Lake, 10 km northeast of airport. All six occupants, one surgeon, three cardiologist and both pilots, were killed.

Crash of a Short 360 in Watertown: 3 killed

Date & Time: Feb 5, 2006 at 1653 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N3735W
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Milwaukee-Milwaukee
MSN:
3735
YOM:
1988
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
1643
Captain / Total hours on type:
1181.00
Aircraft flight hours:
10077
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft left Milwaukee-General Billy Mitchell Airport for an air photo mission with another Short 360-100 from the same operator and registered N372AC (serial number SH.3720). Both aircraft left the airport at the end of the afternoon. While flying over Watertown, both aircraft collided in mid-air. The first aircraft registered N3735W crashed and burst into flames in an open field located near the intersection of highway Q & 19. All three occupants were killed. The second aircraft registered N372AC made an emergency landing at Juneau-Dodge County airport, skidded on the runway and eventually came to rest with serious damage. Nobody was hurt among the three occupants.

Crash of a Pilatus PC-6 Turbo Porter in Sturtevant

Date & Time: May 26, 2005 at 1500 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N346F
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Sturtevant-Sturtevant
MSN:
2001
YOM:
1966
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
18000
Captain / Total hours on type:
30.00
Aircraft flight hours:
9708
Circumstances:
The airplane was engaged in skydiving activities and was approaching to land when it struck a parachutist about 25 feet above ground level. The airplane reportedly veered to the right, struck trees and crashed.