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Crash of a De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver near Ketchikan: 6 killed

Date & Time: Aug 5, 2021 at 1050 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N1249K
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Ketchikan - Ketchikan
MSN:
1594
YOM:
1965
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Circumstances:
On August 5, 2021, about 1050 Alaska daylight time, a DeHavilland DHC-2, N1249K, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Ketchikan, Alaska. The airline transport pilot and five passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was operated by Southeast Aviation, LLC, as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 on-demand sightseeing flight. On the morning of the accident, an airplane fueler noted that the pilot performed a preflight inspection of the airplane and then asked the fueler to fuel the airplane so that the front tank was full (35 gallons) and the center tank was filled to 20 gallons of fuel. The pilot departed on the first passenger flight of the day about 0752 and returned to the dock about 0921. He again asked the fueler to fill and top off the front tank and fill the center tank to 20 gallons (totaling 55 gallons of fuel). Then, the pilot departed on the second passenger flight of the day, the accident flight, about 0939. The airplane was equipped with a Spidertracks flight tracking system, which provides realtime aircraft flight tracking data. The flight tracking information is transmitted via Iridium satellites to an internet-based storage location, at one-minute intervals. The first part of the flight the airplane flew through the Misty Fjord Monument and landed on Big Goat Lake about 1018. Then at 1027, the airplane departed the lake and was en route to return to Ketchikan Harbor. The last satellite tracking system transmission from the airplane was at 1048; when the airplane was at an altitude of 1,730 ft mean sea level (msl) and on a ground track of 261° true. About 1050, the United States Coast Guard (USCG) Alaska received a 406 Mhz emergency locator transmitter (ELT) signal assigned to the accident airplane. After being notified of an overdue airplane and after learning about reports of an ELT signal along the accident pilot’s anticipated flight route, search and rescue personnel from the U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Sitka and Temsco Helicopters, Inc. began searching for the missing airplane. The airplane was located about 1120 and USCG rescue personnel reached the accident site later that afternoon and confirmed that there were no survivors. The airplane impacted heavily wooded, mountainous terrain about 18 miles northeast of Ketchikan, Alaska, and 1.46 miles from the last satellite tracking system point at an elevation of about 1,750 ft msl. The airplane initially impacted a tree about 435 ft from the main wreckage location, and the outboard section of the left wing was located at the base of the tree. The inboard section of the left wing was located in a tree along the debris path, which had a heading of 242°. All major components of the airplane were located in the vicinity of the main wreckage. The fuselage came to rest on the left side and was impact crushed. The right wing remained attached to the fuselage. The outboard section of the right wing was impact separated but remained attached through a cable. The empennage remained attached to the fuselage and was impact damaged. The rudder and vertical stabilizer remained attached to the empennage, but the vertical stabilizer tip was separated. The left horizontal stabilizer and elevator were impact separated. The right horizontal stabilizer remained attached to the empennage and exhibited leading edge damage. The right elevator was impact separated. The floats were impact separated. The forward section of the left float was impact damaged. Flight control continuity was confirmed from the flight controls in the cockpit to all flight control surfaces. The airplane was equipped with a Pratt & Whitney R-985 series engine. The engine remained attached to the airframe though several of the engine mounts were separated and the engine exhibited damage signatures consistent with impact damage. The oil sump was impact damaged and had a hole in it. Fuel was noted in the line from the firewall to the engine. A detailed engine examination is pending. The airplane was equipped with a 3-blade, controllable pitch propeller. All blades remained attached to the hub. The spinner was removed and exhibited impact damage. The propeller blades exhibited bending and chordwise scratching in several locations. Other pilots who were flying passenger flights on the morning of the accident stated that there were low clouds in the valley in which the accident occurred. Pilots who were assisting with the search and rescue efforts reported that the weather was overcast and the mountain tops were obscured. In addition, the clouds were as low as 600-800 ft overcast above ground level
in some of the valleys, including the valley of the accident location.

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver near Naivasha: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jul 12, 2021
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
5Y-BCL
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Nairobi - Lodwa
MSN:
1552
YOM:
1964
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The single engine aircraft departed Nairobi-Jomo Kenyatta Airport on a flight to Lodwa, carrying two passengers and one pilot. The goal of the mission was locust invasion monitoring. En route, the aircraft crashed in unknown circumstances in the hilly Jerusalem area of Ndabibi near Naivasha. One people was killed while two other occupants were injured. The aircraft was destroyed by a post crash fire.

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver in Örebro: 9 killed

Date & Time: Jul 8, 2021 at 1915 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
SE-KKD
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Örebro - Örebro
MSN:
1629RB17
YOM:
1966
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
8
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
9
Circumstances:
The single engine aircraft was completing local skydiving mission at Örebro-Bofors Airport. Shortly after takeoff, while climbing, the aircraft stalled and crashed near the runway, bursting into flames. The aircraft was destroyed by a post crash fire and all 9 occupants were killed.

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver in Soldotna: 6 killed

Date & Time: Jul 31, 2020 at 0827 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N4982U
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
MSN:
904
YOM:
1956
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Circumstances:
On July 31, 2020, about 0827 Alaska daylight time, a de Havilland DHC-2 (Beaver) airplane, N4982U, and a Piper PA-12 airplane, N2587M, were destroyed when they were involved in an accident near Soldotna, Alaska. Both pilots and the five passengers on the DHC-2 were fatally injured. The DHC-2 was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135 on-demand charter flight. The PA-12 was operated as a Title 14 CFR Part 91 personal flight. The float-equipped DHC-2, operated by High Adventure Charter, departed Longmere Lake, Soldotna, about 0824 bound for a remote lake on the west side of Cook Inlet. The purpose of the flight was to transport the passengers to a remote fishing location. The PA-12, operated by a private individual, departed Soldotna Airport, Soldotna, Alaska, about 0824 bound for Fairbanks, Alaska. Preliminary flight track data revealed that the DHC-2 was traveling northwest about 1,175 ft mean sea level (msl) and gradually climbing about 78 knots (kts) when it crossed the Sterling Highway. The PA-12 was traveling northeast about 1,175 ft msl and about 71 kts north of and parallel to the Sterling Highway. The airplanes collided about 2.5 miles northeast of the Soldotna airport at an altitude of about 1,175 ft msl and data signals were lost. A witness located near the accident site observed the DHC-2 traveling in a westerly direction and the PA-12 traveling in a northerly direction. He stated that the PA-12 impacted the DHC-2 on the left side of the fuselage toward the back of the airplane. After the collision, he observed what he believed to be the DHC-2's left wing separate, and the airplane entered an uncontrolled, descending counterclockwise spiral before disappearing from view. He did not observe the PA-12 following the collision. The DHC-2 main wreckage was heavily fragmented and located in a wooded residential area; the fuselage was oriented on a heading of about 270° at an elevation of about 240 ft. A debris field about 300 ft long and oriented on about a 327° heading included the engine, fuselage, wings, vertical stabilizer, and portions of the floats. Dark green paint transfers consistent with the PA-12 were observed on the aft fuselage of the DHC-2. The PA-12 main wreckage was located about 600 ft east of the DHC-2. The airplane impacted in a near vertical attitude and came to rest at an elevation of about 258 ft. The horizontal stabilizer and one elevator from the DHC-2 were found intertwined in the wreckage of the PA-12. The DHC-2 was registered to Soldotna Aircraft and Equipment Leasing. A registration card located inside the PA-12 identified the airplane as a Piper PA-12 with a registration number of N2587M. The Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) registration database revealed that N2587M was a valid registration for a Piper PA-12 assigned to the pilot. However, the PA-12's exterior registration number identified the airplane as N1904T; in addition, the word "EXPERIMENTAL" was applied to the inside of the lower clam shell door. A search of the FAA registration database revealed that the registration number had been reserved by the pilot but was not a valid registration. According to information on file with the FAA Civil Aeromedical Institute, the pilot of the PA12 was denied medical certification in June 2012 by the Alaska Regional Flight Surgeon due to vision problems. The denial was appealed and sustained in July 2012. Neither airplane was equipped with, nor were they required to be equipped with, a crashworthy flight data or cockpit voice recorder. Several avionics components and personal electronic devices were recovered from the wreckage areas. These components and devices were shipped to the National Transportation Safety Board Vehicle Recorders Laboratory, Washington, DC, for further examination.

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver in Lake Coeur d'Alene: 6 killed

Date & Time: Jul 5, 2020 at 1422 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N2106K
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Coeur d'Alene - Coeur d'Alene
MSN:
1131
YOM:
1957
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Circumstances:
On July 5, 2020, about 1422 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna TU206, N6373U, and a De Havilland DHC-2, N2106K, were destroyed when they were involved in an accident near Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. The pilot and passenger of the Cessna and the pilot and 5 passengers of the de Havilland, were fatally injured. The Cessna was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. The de Havilland was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 air tour flight. The operator of the de Havilland reported that the 20-minute local air tour flight originated from the seaplane base, located on the northern part of Lake Coeur d'Alene. Friends of the Cessna pilot reported that the flight had departed from Coeur d'Alene Airport, at an unknown time, with an intended destination of Lewiston, Idaho. Witnesses located in the vicinity of the accident site reported that they observed the float equipped de Havilland flying on a northerly heading, and the Cessna was on a southerly heading. The witnesses reported that both airplanes appeared to be about 700 to 800 ft above the water surface, and that the Cessna may have been slightly lower than the de Havilland, when they collided over the lake. Following the collision, witnesses observed a fireball come from one of the airplanes as both descended into the water. There was no radar or automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) data for either airplane. Local law enforcement reported that the wreckage of both airplanes was submerged in about 130 ft of water, near the center of the lake between Half Round Bay and Black Rock Bay. The wreckages of both airplanes were initially documented once they were removed from the water and were then transported to a secure location where they will be examined.

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver in Sadiqabad: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jan 12, 2020
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
AP-AMB
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Rahim Yar Khan - Rahim Yar Khan
MSN:
1415
YOM:
1960
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The airplane departed Rahim Yar Khan-Sheikh Zayed Airport and was spraying pesticide in the area to tackle another wave of locust attacks, which began in December 2019, on the request of the district administration. In unknown circumstances, the single engine airplane went out of control and crashed in a sandy area located in Sadiqabad, killing both crew members, a pilot and a flight engineer. They were completing a mission on behalf of the Department of Agriculture of Pakistan. Initial investigations suggest the plane crashed due to a technical fault.

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver off Sechelt

Date & Time: Jul 30, 2019 at 1248 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
C-GPZP
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Vancouver - Pender Harbour
MSN:
722
YOM:
1954
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
En route from Vancouver to Pender Harbour, the pilot encountered engine problems and elected to ditch the aircraft about three miles off Sechelt. All three occupants were able to evacuate the cabin before the aircraft sank and was lost. All three occupants were rescued.

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver off Seldovia: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jul 19, 2019 at 1010 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N68083
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Seldovia – Anchorage
MSN:
1254
YOM:
1958
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
2689
Captain / Total hours on type:
150.00
Aircraft flight hours:
29448
Circumstances:
The pilot stated that, during takeoff in the float-equipped airplane, he saw the left float begin to move into his peripheral vision from the left cockpit window and the airplane began to yaw to the left. The left wing subsequently impacted the water and the airplane nosed over, separating the right wing from the fuselage. The passengers consistently reported choppy water conditions at the time of the accident; one passenger reported that white caps were visible on the ocean waves in the distance. The passengers said that, during the takeoff, the airplane impacted a swell or wave and nosed over abruptly, and the cabin rapidly filled with water. Examination of the float assembly revealed fractures in the left front flying wire attachment fitting and the right rear flying wire attachment strap and hole elongation in the left rear flying wire attachment fitting. Additionally, the bolts attaching the two left flying wire attachment fittings to the left float were bent, and the two flying wires that had been attached to the fractured attachment fitting and attachment strap were buckled. While some areas of corrosion were observed on the fractured left forward fitting, the total area of corrosion was a small percentage of the total cross-section, and the remainder of the fracture and associated deformation of the lug was consistent with ductile overstress fracture. Similar areas of corrosion were also observed on each of the intact flying wire attachment fittings. Post-accident testing completed by the float manufacturer revealed that buckling of flying wires similar to that observed on the accident airplane was only reproduced at strap and fitting failure loads above 9,000 pounds force; the design specification load was 3,453 pounds of force. This indicates that the small amount of corrosion present on the fractured flying wire attachment fitting did not reduce its loadcarrying capability below the design specification load of 3,453 pounds of force, and that both the flying wire attachment fitting and flying wire attachment strap fractured due to overload. Therefore, it is likely that the accident airplane floats were subject to forces that exceeded their design limitations, resulting in overload of the flying wires attached to the left float. It is also likely that, given the lack of damage on either float, the force was due to impact with an ocean wave or swell and not by striking an object.
Probable cause:
The airplane's floats impact with an ocean wave or swell, which exceeded the design load specifications of the flying wire assemblies and resulted in a partial separation of the float assemblies.
Final Report:

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver into Mistastin Lake: 7 killed

Date & Time: Jul 15, 2019
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FJKI
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Crossroads Lake - Mistastin Lake
MSN:
992
YOM:
1956
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
7
Circumstances:
The single engine airplane was chartered by a provider based in Crossroads Lake (near Churchill Falls reservoir) to fly four fisherman and two guides to Mistastin Lake, Labrador. The aircraft was supposed to leave Crossroads Lake at 0700LT but the departure was postponed to 1000LT due to low ceiling. Several attempts to contact the pilot failed during the day and the SAR center based in Trenton was alerted. The wreckage was found few hours later at the bottom of the lake, about a nautical mile from the shore. Three people were found dead while four other occupants, including the pilot, were not found after five days of intensive search. A week later, authorities confirmed all seven occupants died.