Crash of a Partenavia P.68 Victor in Carnsore Point

Date & Time: Sep 23, 2021 at 1705 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
F-HIRD
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Waterford - Waterford
MSN:
14
YOM:
1975
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft departed Waterford Airport for a local survey flight. While flying at low altitude, the pilot reported technical difficulties and attempted an emergency landing when the aircraft crashed on a beach located in Carnsore Point and came to rest partially submerged in water. All four occupants were taken to hospital and the aircraft was destroyed.

Crash of a PZL-Mielec AN-2R near Kyren: 6 killed

Date & Time: Jul 19, 2020 at 2030 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
RA-71276
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Kyren - Kyren
MSN:
1G207-47
YOM:
1984
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Circumstances:
The single engine airplane departed Kyren in the afternoon with four employees of the company and two pilots. The purpose of the flight was to familiarize them with the area of ​​the planned aviation chemical works for the processing of the silkworm. In the evening, the aircraft failed to return to Kyren and SAR operations were initiated, but abandoned few days later as no trace of the aircraft was found. More than a year later, on July 24, 2021, a group of tourist discovered the burnt wreckage near the Baikonur Pass, in a rocky area, at an altitude of 2,780 metres. The aircraft was destroyed by a post crash fire and all six occupants were killed.

Crash of a Beechcraft 350i Super King Air on Mt Artos: 7 killed

Date & Time: Jul 15, 2020 at 2245 LT
Operator:
Registration:
EM-809
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Van - Van
MSN:
FL-896
YOM:
2015
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
7
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft departed Van-Ferit Melen Airport at 1834LT on a survey/reconnaissance mission over the province of Hakkari and Van, carrying five passengers and two pilots. At 2232LT, the crew informed ATC about his position vertical to Başkale on approach to Van-Ferit Melen Airport. Thirteen minutes later, the aircraft struck the slope of Mt Artos located 30 km southwest of runway 03 threshold. The aircraft was destroyed upon impact and all seven occupants were killed.

Crash of a Rockwell Shrike Commander 500S off Aniak

Date & Time: May 28, 2020 at 1600 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N909AK
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Aniak - Aniak
MSN:
500-3232
YOM:
1975
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
4869
Captain / Total hours on type:
30.00
Aircraft flight hours:
6966
Circumstances:
On May 28, 2020, about 1600 Alaska daylight time, an Aero Commander 500S airplane, N909AK sustained substantial damage when it was involved in an accident near Aniak, Alaska. The pilot and three passengers sustained serious injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 public aircraft flight. The airplane was owned by the State of Alaska and operated by the Division of Forestry. According to the pilot, after arriving in Aniak, he had the local fuel vendor's ground service personnel refuel the airplane. He then signed the fuel receipt, and he returned to the airplane's cockpit to complete some paperwork before departure. Once the paperwork was complete, he then loaded his passengers, started the airplane's engines, and taxied to Runway 29 for departure. The pilot said that shortly after takeoff, and during initial climb, he initially noticed what he thought was mechanical turbulence followed by a reduction in climb performance, and the airplane's engines began to lose power. Unable to maintain altitude and while descending about 400 ft per minute, he selected an area of shallow water covered terrain as an off-airport landing site. The airplane sustained substantial damage during the landing. The fueler reported that he was unfamiliar with the airplane, so he queried the pilot as to where he should attach the grounding strap and the location of the fuel filler port. Before starting to refuel the airplane, he asked the pilot "do you want Prist with your Jet" to which the pilot responded that he did not. After completing the refueling process, he returned to his truck, wrote "Jet A" in the meter readings section of the prepared receipt, and presented it to the pilot for his signature. The pilot signed the receipt and was provided a copy. The fueler stated that he later added "no Prist" to his copy of the receipt, and that he did not see a fuel placard near the fueling port. A postaccident examination revealed that the reciprocating engine airplane had been inadvertently serviced with Jet A fuel. A slightly degraded placard near the fuel port on the top of the wing stated, in part: "FUEL 100/100LL MINIMUM GRADE AVIATION GASOLINE ONLY CAPACITY 159.6 US GALLONS."
Probable cause:
Loss of engine power after the aircraft has been refueled with an inappropriate fuel.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 402C in Hampton

Date & Time: May 9, 2020 at 1513 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N4661N
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Peachtree City - Peachtree City
MSN:
402C-0019
YOM:
1979
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
7330
Captain / Total hours on type:
11.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
1096
Copilot / Total hours on type:
5
Aircraft flight hours:
17081
Circumstances:
According the commercial pilot and a flight instructor rated check pilot, they were conducting their first long-duration, aerial observation flight in the multiengine airplane, which was recently acquired by the operator. They departed with full fuel tanks, competed the 5-hour aerial observation portion of the flight, and began to return to the destination airport. About 15 miles from the airport, the left engine fuel warning light illuminated. Within a few seconds, the right engine stopped producing power. They attempted to restart the engine and turned the airplane toward an alternate airport that was closer. The pilots then turned on the electric fuel pump, the right engine began surging, and soon after the left engine stopped producing power. They turned both electric fuel pumps to the low setting, both engines continued to surge, and the pilots continued toward the alternate airport. When they were about 3 miles from the airport, both engines lost total power, and they elected to land on a highway. When they were a few feet above the ground, power returned briefly to the left engine, which resulted in the airplane climbing and beginning to roll. The commercial pilot pulled the yoke aft to avoid a highway sign, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall, and subsequent impact with trees and terrain. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. Although both pilots reported the fuel gauges indicated 20 gallons of fuel remaining on each side when the engines stopped producing power, the flight instructor noted that there was no fuel in the airplane at the time of the accident. In addition, according to a Federal Aviation Administration inspector who responded to the accident site, both fuel tanks were breached and there was no evidence of fuel spillage.
Probable cause:
A dual total loss of engine power as a result of fuel exhaustion.
Final Report:

Crash of a Harbin Yunsunji Y-12-II in Haputale: 4 killed

Date & Time: Jan 3, 2020
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
SCL-857
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Wirawila - Colombo
MSN:
0021
YOM:
1990
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
Crashed in unknown circumstances in Haputale while completing a survey flight from Wirawila to Colombo-Ratmalana Airport. The aircraft was destroyed by a post crash fire and all four crew members were killed.

Crash of a Piper PA-31-350 Navajo Chieftain in Madeira: 1 killed

Date & Time: Mar 12, 2019 at 1516 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N400JM
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Cincinnati - Cincinnati
MSN:
31-8152002
YOM:
1981
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
6421
Captain / Total hours on type:
1364.00
Aircraft flight hours:
19094
Circumstances:
The commercial pilot was conducting an aerial observation (surveying) flight in a piston engineequipped multiengine airplane. Several hours into the flight, the pilot advised air traffic control (ATC) that the airplane had a fuel problem and that he needed to return to the departure airport. When the airplane was 8 miles from the airport, and after passing several other airports, the pilot informed ATC that he was unsure if the airplane could reach the airport. The final minutes of radar data depicted the airplane in a descent and tracking toward a golf fairway as the airplane's groundspeed decreased to a speed near the single engine minimum control airspeed. According to witnesses, they heard an engine sputter before making two loud "back-fire" sounds. One witness reported that, after the engine sputtered, the airplane "was on its left side flying crooked." Additional witnesses reported that the airplane turned to the left before it "nose-dived" into a neighborhood, impacting a tree and private residence before coming to rest in the backyard of the residence. A witness approached the wreckage immediately after the accident and observed a small flame rising from the area of the left engine. Video recorded on the witness' mobile phone several minutes later showed the airplane engulfed in flames. Examination of the wreckage revealed no evidence of any preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures of either engine. The fuel systems feeding both engines were damaged by impact forces but the examined components generally displayed that only trace amounts of fuel remained; with the exception of the left engine nacelle fuel tank. Given the extent of the fire damage to this area of the wreckage, and the witness report that the post impact fire originated in this area, it is likely that this tank contained fuel. By design, this fuel in this tank was not able to supply fuel directly to either engine, but instead relied on an electric pump to transfer fuel into the left main fuel tank. Fire damage precluded a detailed postaccident examination or functional testing of the left nacelle fuel transfer pump. Other pilots who flew similar airplanes for the operator, along with a review of maintenance records for those airplanes, revealed at least three instances of these pumps failing in the months surrounding the accident. The other pilots also reported varying methods of utilizing fuel and monitoring fuel transfers of fuel from the nacelle fuel tanks, since there was no direct indication of the quantity of fuel available in the tank. These methods were not standardized between pilots within the company and relied on their monitoring the quantity of fuel in the main fuel tanks in order to ensure that the fuel transfer was occurring. Had the pilot not activated this pump, or had this pump failed during the flight, it would have rendered the fuel in the tank inaccessible. Given this information it is likely that the fuel supply available to the airplane's left engine was exhausted, and that the engine subsequently lost power due to fuel starvation. The accident pilot, along with another company pilot, identified fuel leaking from the airplane's left wing, about a week before the accident. Maintenance records showed no actions had been completed to the address the fuel leak. Due to damage sustained during the accident, the origin of the fuel leak could not be determined, nor could it be determined whether the fuel leak contributed to the fuel starvation and eventual inflight loss of power to the left engine. Because the left engine stopped producing power, the pilot would have needed to configure the airplane for single-engine flight; however, examination of the left engine's propeller found that it was not feathered. With the propeller in this state, the pilot's ability to maintain control the airplane would have been reduced, and it is likely that the pilot allowed the airplane's airspeed to decrease below the singleengine minimum controllable airspeed, which resulted in a loss of control and led to the airplane's roll to the left and rapid descent toward the terrain. Toxicology results revealed that the pilot had taken doxylamine, an over-the-counter antihistamine that can decrease alertness and impair performance of potentially hazardous tasks. Although the toxicology results indicated that the amount of doxylamine in the pilot's cavity blood was within the lower therapeutic range, review of ATC records revealed that the pilot was alert and that he was making necessary decisions and following instructions. Thus, the pilot's use of doxylamine was not likely a factor in the accident.
Probable cause:
Fuel starvation to the left engine and the resulting loss of engine power to that engine, and a loss of airplane control due to the pilot's failure to maintain the minimum controllable airspeed.
Final Report:

Crash of an Ilyushin II-20M off Latakia: 15 killed

Date & Time: Sep 17, 2018 at 2207 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
RF-93610
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Hmeimim - Hmeimim
MSN:
173 0115 04
YOM:
1973
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
15
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
15
Circumstances:
The four engine aircraft departed Hmeimim AFB located southeast of Latakia at 2031LT on a maritime patrol and reconnaissance mission over the Mediterranean Sea. About an one hour and a half later, while returning to its base, the airplane was hit by a S-200 surface-to-air missile shot by the Syrian ground forces. At the time of the accident, four Israel F-16 fighters were involved in a ground attack onto several infrastructures located in the region of Latakia. Out of control, the airplane crashed into the Mediterranean Sea some 35 km west of Latakia. The following morning, Russian Authorities confirmed the loss of the aircraft that was inadvertently shot down by the Syrian Army forces and that all 15 crew members were killed.
Probable cause:
Shot down by a Syrian S-200 surface-to-air missile.

Crash of a Swearingen SA227AT Expediter in Luqa: 5 killed

Date & Time: Oct 24, 2016 at 0720 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N577MX
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Luqa - Luqa
MSN:
AT-577
YOM:
1983
Flight number:
LXC77
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
3511
Captain / Total hours on type:
1229.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
21806
Copilot / Total hours on type:
2304
Aircraft flight hours:
9261
Aircraft flight cycles:
3503
Circumstances:
The aircraft was involved in a maritime patrol flight over the Mediterranean Sea, carrying a crew of two and three members of the French Ministry of Defense. Shortly after takeoff from runway 13, while in initial climb, the twin engine aircraft banked to the right, hit a perimeter fence and crashed in a huge explosion on the Triq Carmelo Caruana Street. The aircraft was destroyed by impact forces and a post crash fire. All five occupants were killed. It was previously reported that the flight was performed on behalf of the EU Frontex Program but this was later denied by the Border Agency. The presence of all three French Officers was confirmed by the French Minister of Defense Jean-Yves Le Drian. It was also confirmed by the Government of Malta that this kind of flight was performed by the French Customs since five months, an official operation of surveillance to identify human traffic and narcotics routes in the Mediterranean Sea.
Probable cause:
Investigations show that a technical malfunction was the cause of the accident. This malfunction probably originated in the specific modifications of the aircraft and in the application of an inappropriate maintenance to these modifications.
Three scenarios can be envisaged:
- Rupture of the HF antenna, which then wrapped around the elevator control surface;
- Inadvertent activation of the SAS, countered by the pilot;
- Jamming of the elevator due to a technical failure in the flight control line.
Given the condition of the wreckage and the absence of witness reports from the crew, only a flight data recorder could have enabled the BEA-É to confirm one of these hypothesis. However, in consideration of the factors detailed in the analysis, the hypothesis of damage to a component of the elevator control line remains the most plausible explanation.
Final Report:

Crash of a Casa 212 Aviocar 400MPA off Bạch Long Vĩ Island: 9 killed

Date & Time: Jun 16, 2016 at 1305 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
8983
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Hanoi - Hanoi
MSN:
482
YOM:
2012
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
9
Circumstances:
The crew departed Hanoi-Gia Lam Airport at 0930LT on a SAR mission after a Vietnam Air Force Sukhoi SU-30 was missing since two days. While cruising over the gulf of Tonkin in good weather conditions, the twin engine aircraft went out of control and crashed in the sea, some 22 km southwest of the Bạch Long Vĩ Island. Some debris were found few hours later, floating on water. All nine occupants were killed.