Crash of a Rockwell 500S Shrike Commander in Pembroke Park: 2 killed

Date & Time: Aug 28, 2020 at 0902 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N900DT
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Pompano Beach – North Perry
MSN:
500-3056
YOM:
1969
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
On August 28, 2020, about 0902 eastern daylight time, an Aero Commander Aircraft 500-S, N900DT, was destroyed when it impacted a building near Pembroke Park, Florida. The commercial pilot and pilot-rated passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 business flight. According to preliminary Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) ADS-B and audio information, after takeoff from Pompano Beach Airpark about 0852, the flight proceeded in a southeast direction to the shore, then flew in a south-southwest direction just offshore. About 0858, when the flight was about 13 nautical miles northeast from Miami-Opa Locka Executive Airport (OPF), which was the destination, an occupant onboard the airplane contacted the OPF air traffic control tower (ATCT) and advised the controller that the flight was inbound. The flight was radar identified and continued in a south-southwest direction while climbing to 1,100 ft mean sea level (msl). At about 0859:49, or 1 minute 49 seconds after the initial contact with the OPF ATCT, an occupant advised the controller, "and uh november delta tango ah we have uh an engine problem, we [are going] to North Perry [Airport]." The OPF ATCT initially coordinated with Miami Approach and advised the facility that the flight was descending, with a last reported altitude of 300 ft. The controller then attempted to coordinate with North Perry ATCT. About 0859:53, the airplane turned to a southwest direction, climbed to about 1250 ft msl. About that time a witness who was located about 2.8 nautical miles east-southeast of the flightpath when the airplane was flying in the southwest direction reported hearing the engines accelerating and decelerating which changed to a popping sound. The airplane continued flying and went out of his earshot. The ADS-B data reflected that about 0900:47, the airplane turned and flew in a west-northwesterly direction until about 0901:58, when the flight proceeded in a north-northwest direction until near the accident site. Witnesses who were on a golf course north of the accident site reported seeing the airplane flying in a westerly direction with no reported engine sound. They then noted the airplane banked left and then descended. The airplane collided with the east face of a storage building in a densely populated area, then fell to the parking lot of the building. There were no reported ground injuries. Preliminary examination of the accident site revealed an impact mark on the building which reflected the airplane being in a right bank. Examination of the wreckage revealed no evidence of pre or postimpact fire.

Crash of a Rockwell Shrike Commander 500S off Aniak

Date & Time: May 28, 2020 at 1600 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N909AK
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Aniak - Aniak
MSN:
500-3232
YOM:
1975
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
4869
Captain / Total hours on type:
30.00
Aircraft flight hours:
6966
Circumstances:
On May 28, 2020, about 1600 Alaska daylight time, an Aero Commander 500S airplane, N909AK sustained substantial damage when it was involved in an accident near Aniak, Alaska. The pilot and three passengers sustained serious injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 public aircraft flight. The airplane was owned by the State of Alaska and operated by the Division of Forestry. According to the pilot, after arriving in Aniak, he had the local fuel vendor's ground service personnel refuel the airplane. He then signed the fuel receipt, and he returned to the airplane's cockpit to complete some paperwork before departure. Once the paperwork was complete, he then loaded his passengers, started the airplane's engines, and taxied to Runway 29 for departure. The pilot said that shortly after takeoff, and during initial climb, he initially noticed what he thought was mechanical turbulence followed by a reduction in climb performance, and the airplane's engines began to lose power. Unable to maintain altitude and while descending about 400 ft per minute, he selected an area of shallow water covered terrain as an off-airport landing site. The airplane sustained substantial damage during the landing. The fueler reported that he was unfamiliar with the airplane, so he queried the pilot as to where he should attach the grounding strap and the location of the fuel filler port. Before starting to refuel the airplane, he asked the pilot "do you want Prist with your Jet" to which the pilot responded that he did not. After completing the refueling process, he returned to his truck, wrote "Jet A" in the meter readings section of the prepared receipt, and presented it to the pilot for his signature. The pilot signed the receipt and was provided a copy. The fueler stated that he later added "no Prist" to his copy of the receipt, and that he did not see a fuel placard near the fueling port. A postaccident examination revealed that the reciprocating engine airplane had been inadvertently serviced with Jet A fuel. A slightly degraded placard near the fuel port on the top of the wing stated, in part: "FUEL 100/100LL MINIMUM GRADE AVIATION GASOLINE ONLY CAPACITY 159.6 US GALLONS."
Probable cause:
Loss of engine power after the aircraft has been refueled with an inappropriate fuel.
Final Report:

Crash of a Rockwell 500U Shrike Commander in Badu Island

Date & Time: Mar 8, 2015 at 1230 LT
Operator:
Registration:
VH-WZV
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Badu Island - Horn Island
MSN:
500-1656-11
YOM:
1966
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On 8 March 2015, the pilot of an Aero Commander 500 aircraft, registered VH-WZV, prepared to conduct a charter flight from Badu Island to Horn Island, Queensland, with five passengers. The aircraft had been refuelled earlier that day at Horn Island, where the pilot conducted fuel drains with no contaminants found. He had operated the aircraft for about 2 hours prior to landing at Badu Island with no abnormal performance or indications. At about 1330 Eastern Standard Time (EST), the pilot started the engines and conducted the standard checks with all indications normal, obtained the relevant clearances from air traffic control, and taxied for a departure from runway 30. As the pilot lined the aircraft up on the runway centreline at the threshold, he performed a pre-take-off safety self-brief and conducted the pre-takeoff checks. He then applied full power, released the brakes and commenced the take-off run. All engine indications were normal during the taxi and commencement of the take-off run. When the airspeed had increased to about 80 kt, the pilot commenced rotation and the nose and main landing gear lifted off the runway. Just as the main landing gear lifted off, the pilot detected a significant loss of power from the left engine. The aircraft yawed to the left, which the pilot counteracted with right rudder. He heard the left engine noise decrease noticeably and the aircraft dropped back onto the runway. The pilot immediately rejected the take-off; reduced the power to idle, and used rudder and brakes to maintain the runway centreline. The pilot initially assessed that there was sufficient runway remaining to stop on but, due to the wet runway surface, the aircraft did not decelerate as quickly as expected and he anticipated that the aircraft would overrun the runway. As there was a steep slope and trees beyond the end of the runway, he steered the aircraft to the right towards more open and level ground. The aircraft departed the runway to the right, collided with a fence and a bush resulting in substantial damage. The pilot and passengers were not injured.
Final Report:

Crash of a Rockwell Shrike Commander 500S in Fort Huachuca: 1 killed

Date & Time: May 17, 2014 at 1020 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N40TC
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Fort Huachuca - Fort Huachuca
MSN:
500-3091
YOM:
1976
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
13175
Captain / Total hours on type:
600.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
16560
Copilot / Total hours on type:
4100
Aircraft flight hours:
21660
Circumstances:
The commercial pilot reported that the purpose of the flight was to perform a check/orientation flight with the airline transport pilot (ATP), who was new to the area; the ATP was the pilot flying. The airplane was started, and an engine run-up completed. The commercial pilot reported that, during the takeoff roll, all of the gauges were in the “green.” After reaching an airspeed of 80 knots, the airplane lifted off the ground. About 350 ft above ground level (agl), the pilots felt the airplane “jolt.” The commercial pilot stated that it felt like a loss of power had occurred and that the airplane was not responding. He immediately shut off the boost pumps, and the ATP initiated a slow left turn in an attempt to return to the airport to land. The airplane descended rapidly in a nose-low, right-wing-low attitude and impacted the ground. A witness reported that he watched the airplane take off and that it sounded normal until it reached the departure end of the runway, at which point he heard a distinct “pop pop,” followed by silence. The airplane then entered an approximate 45-degree left turn with no engine sound and descended at a high rate with the wings rolling level before the airplane went out of sight. Another witness made a similar statement. Based on the witnesses’ statements and photographs of the twisted airplane at the accident site, it is likely that a total loss of engine power occurred and that, during the subsequent turn back to the airport, the ATP did not maintain sufficient airspeed and exceeded the airplane’s critical angle-of-attack, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall and impact with terrain. Although a postaccident examination of the airframe and engines did reveal an inconsistency between the cockpit control positions and the positions of the fuel shutoff valves on the sump tank, this would not have precluded normal operation. No other anomalies were found that would have precluded normal operation.
Probable cause:
The pilot’s failure to maintain adequate airspeed and his exceedance of the airplane’s critical angle-of-attack after a total loss of engine power during the takeoff initial climb, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall and impact with terrain. The reason for the total loss of engine power could not be determined because an examination of the airframe and engines did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.
Final Report:

Crash of a Rockwell Shrike Commander 500S off El Loa: 2 killed

Date & Time: May 18, 2012 at 0150 LT
Operator:
Registration:
CC-CGX
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Iquique - Iquique
MSN:
500-3306
YOM:
1978
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
20183
Captain / Total hours on type:
10000.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
3755
Copilot / Total hours on type:
2137
Aircraft flight hours:
16308
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft departed Iquique-General Diego Aracena Airport at 2115LT on May 17 on a fishing survey and prospection mission over the Pacific Ocean, carrying two pilots. There was sufficient fuel on board for a 7,5-hour flight. While cruising by night, the aircraft entered an uncontrolled descent and crashed in the sea about 30 km northwest of El Loa. Few debris were found floating on water the following morning. Both occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
A loss of control in flight for unknown reasons.
Final Report:

Crash of a Rockwell Shrike Commander 500S in Plan de La Laguna: 2 killed

Date & Time: Mar 8, 2012 at 1125 LT
Operator:
Registration:
TG-JAB
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
San Pedro Sula - Tegucigalpa
MSN:
500-3303
YOM:
1977
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
For unknown reasons, the twin engine aircraft was flying low when it impacted tree tops and crashed in a wooded area located in Plan de La Laguna, in the Comayagua National Park. Both occupants were killed.

Crash of a Rockwell Shrike Commander 500S in Eden Prairie

Date & Time: Apr 8, 2011 at 1730 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N51RF
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Eden Prairie - Eden Prairie
MSN:
500-3298
YOM:
1976
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
473
Captain / Total hours on type:
217.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
4659
Copilot / Total hours on type:
2480
Aircraft flight hours:
11298
Circumstances:
The pilot reported that he performed a stabilized visual approach with a right crosswind. The airplane touched down on the centerline and subsequently drifted to the right. The pilot overcorrected for the drift and the airplane veered hard to the left. The airplane continued off the left side of the runway and skidded to a complete stop. The right main landing gear collapsed and the right wingtip hit the ground, which resulted in substantial damage to the fuselage and wing. A postaccident inspection of the airplane revealed no preimpact anomalies. The pilot additionally reported that there was no mechanical malfunction or failure.
Probable cause:
The pilot's inadequate compensation for the crosswind while landing, which resulted in a loss of directional control.
Final Report:

Crash of a Rockwell Shrike Commander 500S off Horn Island: 1 killed

Date & Time: Feb 24, 2011 at 0800 LT
Operator:
Registration:
VH-WZU
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Cairns - Horn Island
MSN:
3060
YOM:
1970
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
4154
Captain / Total hours on type:
209.00
Aircraft flight hours:
17545
Circumstances:
At 0445 Eastern Standard Time on 24 February 2011, the pilot of an Aero Commander 500S, registered VH-WZU, commenced a freight charter flight from Cairns to Horn Island, Queensland under the instrument flight rules. The aircraft arrived in the Horn Island area at about 0720 and the pilot advised air traffic control that he intended holding east of the island due to low cloud and rain. At about 0750 he advised pilots in the area that he was north of Horn Island and was intending to commence a visual approach. When the aircraft did not arrive a search was commenced but the pilot and aircraft were not found. On about 10 October 2011, the wreckage was located on the seabed about 26 km north-north-west of Horn Island.
Probable cause:
The ATSB found that the aircraft had not broken up in flight and that it impacted the water at a relatively low speed and a near wings-level attitude, consistent with it being under control at impact. It is likely that the pilot encountered rain and reduced visibility when manoeuvring to commence a visual approach. However, there was insufficient evidence available to determine why the aircraft impacted the water.
Several aspects of the flight increased risk. The pilot had less than 4 hours sleep during the night before the flight and the operator did not have any procedures or guidance in place to minimize the fatigue risk associated with early starts. In addition, the pilot, who was also the operator’s chief pilot, had either not met the recency requirements or did not have an endorsement to conduct the types of instrument approaches available at Horn Island and several other locations frequently used by the operator.
Final Report: