Crash of a Cessna 402C in Papa Lealea

Date & Time: Jul 26, 2020
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-TSI
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Papa Lealea - Mareeba
MSN:
402C-0492
YOM:
1981
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from Papa Lealea, enroute to Mareeba, Australia, the twin engine airplane lost height and crashed in an open field, bursting into flames. The pilot was not found in site and the aircraft was partially destroyed by fire. Later, the Royal Papua New Guinea Constabulary and the AFP found 28 bags containing what investigators believe is 500 kilograms of cocaine.

Crash of a Cessna 402C in Hampton

Date & Time: May 9, 2020 at 1515 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N4661N
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Peachtree City - Peachtree City
MSN:
402C-0019
YOM:
1979
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft departed Peachtree City-Falcon Field Airport at 0921LT on a survey flight of an area located north of Atlanta. In the afternoon, while returning to its base, the aircraft crashed in a wooded area located near Hampton. The wreckage was found near the Atlanta Motor Speedway. Both occupants were injured.

Crash of a Cessna 402B in Tanner-Hiller

Date & Time: Apr 26, 2018 at 1715 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N87266
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Tanner-Hiller - Tanner-Hiller
MSN:
402B-1097
YOM:
1976
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
330
Aircraft flight hours:
9193
Circumstances:
On April 26, 2018, about 1715 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 402B, N87266, was substantially damaged during landing at Tanner-Hiller Airport (8B5), Barre Plains, Massachusetts. The private pilot and two passengers were not injured. No flight plan was filed for the local personal flight that was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight departed Dillant-Hopkins Airport (EEN), Keene, New Hampshire, about 1630. According to the pilot, he was trying to land at 8B5 in gusty wind conditions and performed two go-arounds prior to landing on runway 06. He said the wind was "bumpy" below the trees, and he made a steep approach to the runway "consistent with a short field landing." He flared about midfield, and the airplane continued to float down the runway. He stated the airplane "floated and floated much further down the runway than normal" even though he approached the runway at a "normal" airspeed of 95 knots and with full flaps. The airplane touched down and despite maximum braking, overran the departure end of runway 06, and impacted trees. The pilot and passengers egressed the airplane before a post-impact fire ensued. The pilot stated that he believed he encountered a wind rotor over the trees, which changed the direction of the wind to a quartering tailwind. He checked the weather at three surrounding airports, but he did not trust the wind reports. He did not get a weather briefing before the flight. A FAA inspector examined the airplane where it came to rest, about 300 ft past the end of the 3,027 ft-long runway. The left wing outboard of the left engine impacted trees. The left wingtip was separated, and the left horizontal stabilizer was damaged. All major components were accounted for at the scene and all flight controls were functional. According to FAA records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine and multi-engine land airplane. His most recent FAA third-class airman medical certificate was issued December 7, 2009. A review of the pilots logbooks revealed he had about 330 hours of total flight time flight time and 220 hours of multi-engine flight time. At 1654, the weather conditions reported at Worcester Regional Airport (ORH), about 13 miles southeast of 8B5, included wind from 270° at 16 knots gusting to 27 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, scattered clouds at 4,500 ft, temperature 14°C, dew point 4°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.70 inches of mercury.

Crash of a Cessna 402B in St Petersburg

Date & Time: Oct 18, 2017 at 1545 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N900CR
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Miami - Tallahassee
MSN:
402B-1356
YOM:
1978
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
622
Circumstances:
The aircraft was substantially damaged during a forced landing to a street in St. Petersburg, Florida. The commercial pilot, one passenger, and two motorists sustained minor injuries. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time, and a visual flight rules flight plan was filed for flight that departed Tampa International Airport (TPA), Tampa, Florida, at 1526. The flight was destined for the Sarasota/Bradenton International Airport (SRQ), Sarasota, Florida. The flight was operated by Noble Air Charter under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135. According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, about 13 minutes after departure the pilot advised the Tampa air traffic control tower that he was "fuel critical" and requested vectors for the nearest airport. The TPA tower controller provided a heading toward the Albert Whitted Airport (SPG), St. Petersburg, Florida, located about 7 miles away. The pilot reported that he had 20 minutes of fuel on board. At 1543, the pilot was given a vector to runway 4, which was at his 12 o'clock and 4 miles away. The pilot reported the airport in sight, and the TPA tower controller provided the SPG tower frequency. There were no further radio transmissions. The airplane landed on a residential street about 2 miles from SPG, and collided with two motor vehicles. Examination of the airplane by an FAA inspector revealed substantial damage to both wings, the horizontal stabilizer, elevator, and nose section. Both wingtips and wing tip fuel tanks were separated from the wings. The left wing tip fuel tank exhibited minor sooting and heat damage. The left engine fuel selector was found in the left main fuel tank position, the right engine fuel selector was in the right main fuel tank position. According to charter records obtained from the operator, the accident occurred during the third leg of a four-leg trip. The records indicated that at the start of the trip, the airplane's hour meter read 589.0 hours. At the accident scene, it read 592.6 hours.According to FAA airman records, the pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single and multiengine land, and instrument airplane. His most recent first class medical certificate was issued on November 16, 2016. According to his logbook, the pilot had accrued 622 total hours of flight experience.