Region

Crash of a Cessna 208B Grand Caravan in Clonbullogue: 2 killed

Date & Time: May 13, 2018 at 1438 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-KNYS
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Clonbullogue - Clonbullogue
MSN:
208B-1146
YOM:
2005
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
2157
Aircraft flight hours:
4670
Aircraft flight cycles:
6379
Circumstances:
The Cessna 208B aircraft took off from Runway 27 at Clonbullogue Airfield (EICL), Co. Offaly at approximately 13.14 hrs. On board were the Pilot and a Passenger (a child), who were seated in the cockpit, and 16 skydivers, who occupied the main cabin. The skydivers jumped from the aircraft, as planned, when the aircraft was overhead EICL at an altitude of approximately 13,000 feet. When the aircraft was returning to the airfield, the Pilot advised by radio that he was on ‘left base’ (the flight leg which precedes the approach leg and which is normally approximately perpendicular to the extended centreline of the runway). No further radio transmissions were received. A short while later, it was established that the aircraft had impacted nose-down into a forested peat bog at Ballaghassan, Co. Offaly, approximately 2.5 nautical miles (4.6 kilometres) to the north-west of EICL. The aircraft was destroyed. There was no fire. The Pilot and Passenger were fatally injured.
Probable cause:
Impact with terrain following a loss of control in a steeply banked left-hand turn. The following contributing factors were reported:
- The steeply banked nature of the turn being performed,
- Propeller torque reaction following a rapid and large increase in engine torque,
- The aircraft’s speed while manoeuvring during the steeply banked turn,
- Insufficient height above ground to effect a successful recovery.
Final Report:

Crash of an ATR72-212 in Shannon

Date & Time: Jul 17, 2011 at 1021 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
EI-SLM
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Manchester - Shannon
MSN:
413
YOM:
1994
Flight number:
EIN3601
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
21
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2882
Captain / Total hours on type:
2444.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
1678
Copilot / Total hours on type:
1351
Aircraft flight hours:
32617
Aircraft flight cycles:
37149
Circumstances:
The aircraft and crew commenced operations in EINN that morning, departing at 05.52 hrs and arriving at EGCC at 07.13 hrs. During the turnaround, fuel was uplifted and 21 passengers boarded. Using the flight number and call sign EI-3601 the scheduled passenger service departed EGCC at 07.47 hrs for EINN with an estimated flight time of one hour and nine minutes. En-route operations were normal and, in consultation with ATC, the aircraft descended and was cleared to self-position to DERAG2 for an Instrument Landing System (ILS) approach to RWY 24.
At 09.08 hrs the aircraft commenced an approach to RWY 24 in strong and gusty crosswind conditions. Following a turbulent approach difficulty was experienced in landing the aircraft, which contacted the runway in a nose-down attitude and bounced. A go-around was performed and the aircraft was vectored for a second approach. During this second approach landing turbulence was again experienced. Following bounces the aircraft pitched nose down and contacted the runway heavily in a nose down attitude. The nose gear collapsed and the aircraft nose descended onto the runway. The aircraft sustained damage with directional control being lost. The aircraft came to rest at the junction of the runway and a taxiway. Following engine shutdown the forward Cabin Crew Member (CCM) advised the cockpit that there was no smoke and that the doors could be opened following which, an evacuation was commenced. Airport fire crews arrived on scene promptly and assisted passengers disembarking the aircraft. There were no injuries.
Probable cause:
Probable Cause:
1. Excessive approach speed and inadequate control of aircraft pitch during a crosswind landing in very blustery conditions.
Contributory Factors:
1. Confusing wording in the FCOM that led the crew to compute an excessive wind factor in the determination of Vapp.
2. Incorrect power handling technique while landing.
3. Inexperience of the pilot in command.
4. Inadequate information provided to flight crew regarding crosswind landing techniques.
Final Report:

Crash of a Swearingen SA227BC Metro III in Cork: 6 killed

Date & Time: Feb 10, 2011 at 0950 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
EC-ITP
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Belfast-Cork
MSN:
BC-789B
YOM:
1992
Flight number:
NM7100
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
10
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Captain / Total flying hours:
1801
Captain / Total hours on type:
1600.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
539
Copilot / Total hours on type:
289
Aircraft flight hours:
32653
Aircraft flight cycles:
34156
Circumstances:
The aircraft departed Belfast City Airport (EGAC) on an international scheduled passenger service to Cork Airport (EICK). Low Visibility Procedures (LVP) were in operation at the destination. The aircraft carried out two ILS1 approaches, each followed by a missed approach. The aircraft then entered a holding pattern following which a third ILS approach was made to Runway (RWY) 17. The approach was continued below Decision Height (200 ft) and a missed approach was initiated. Approaching the runway threshold, the aircraft rolled to the left followed by a rapid roll to the right during which the right wingtip contacted the runway surface. The aircraft continued to roll and impacted the runway in a fully inverted position. The aircraft departed the runway surface to the right and came to rest in soft ground. A significant quantity of mud entered the aircraft through a fracture in the roof, partially filling the cabin. Six persons (including the two Flight Crew members) were fatally injured, four were seriously injured and two received minor injuries. The propeller blades on both engines were severely damaged; three of the four propeller blades on the right-hand engine detached during the impact sequence. Fire occurred in both engines after impact. These fires were extinguished expeditiously by the Airport Fire Service.
Probable cause:
Loss of control during an attempted go-around initiated below Decision Height (200 feet) in Instrument Meteorological Conditions.
The following factors were considered as significant:
- The approach was continued in conditions of poor visibility below those required.
- The descent was continued below the Decision Height without adequate visual reference being acquired.
- Uncoordinated operation of the flight and engine controls when go-around was attempted
- The engine power-levers were retarded below the normal in-flight operational range, an action prohibited in flight.
- A power difference between the engines became significant when the engine power levers were retarded below the normal in-flight range.
- Tiredness and fatigue on the part of the Flight Crew members.
- Inadequate command training and checking.
- Inappropriate pairing of Flight Crew members, and
- Inadequate oversight of the remote Operation by the Operator and the State of the Operator.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 208B Grand Caravan in Aerfort na Minna (Aran Island): 2 killed

Date & Time: Jul 5, 2007 at 1449 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N208EC
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Inis Meáin - Aerfort na Minna
MSN:
208B-1153
YOM:
2005
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
8
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
9001
Captain / Total hours on type:
476.00
Aircraft flight hours:
320
Aircraft flight cycles:
275
Circumstances:
The purpose of the flight was a demonstration of an aircraft to a group of potential investors and interested parties associated with a proposed airport at Clifden, Co. Galway, some 25 nm to the northwest of EICA. The flight was organised by one of this group who requested the aircraft, a Cessna Caravan registration N208EC, through an Aircraft Services Intermediary (ASI) from the aircraft’s beneficial owner. The owner agreed to loan his aircraft and the pilot, to fly the group from EICA to EIMN, (a distance of 9 nm) and back. The aircraft departed from Weston (EIWT) aerodrome, near Dublin, at 08.20 hrs on the day of the accident. It over flew Galway (EICM) to EICA where it landed and shutdown. There were two persons on board, the Pilot and an Aircraft Maintenance Specialist (AMS). After a short discussion with ground staff, the Pilot and AMS flew a familiarisation flight to EIMN where the aircraft landed and taxied to the terminal. It did not stop or shut down but turned on the ramp and flew back to EICA where it shut down and parked while awaiting the arrival of the group. The group assembled at EICA, but as there were too many passengers to be accommodated on one aircraft, two flights were proposed with the aircraft returning to pick up the remainder. The aircraft then departed with the first part of the group. On arrival at EIMN, the Pilot contacted those remaining and informed them that he would not be returning for them. This did not cause a problem because an Aer Arran Islander aircraft, with its pilot, was available at EICA to fly the remainder of the group across to EIMN. Following lunch in a local hotel the AMS made a presentation on behalf of the ASI on the Cessna Caravan, its operation and costing. The Pilot assisted him, answering questions of an operational nature. During the presentation two members of the group, who had a meeting to attend on the mainland, travelled back on the Islander aircraft to EICA. The Islander aircraft subsequently returned to EIMN to assist in transporting the remainder of the group back to EICA. The aircraft was returning on a short flight from Inis Meáin (EIMN), one of the Aran Islands in Galway Bay, to Connemara Airport (EICA), in marginal weather conditions when the accident occurred. There had been a significant wind shift, since the time the aircraft had departed earlier from EICA that morning, of which the Pilot appeared to be unaware. As a result a landing was attempted downwind. At a late stage, a go-around was initiated, at a very low speed and high power setting. The aircraft turned to the left, did not gain altitude and maintained a horizontal trajectory. It hit a mound, left wing first and cartwheeled. The Pilot and one of the passengers were fatally injured. The remaining seven passengers were seriously injured. The aircraft was destroyed but there was no fire. The emergency fire service from the airport quickly attended. Later an ambulance, a local doctor and then the Galway Fire Services arrived. A Coastguard Search and Rescue helicopter joined in transporting the injured to hospital. The Gardaí Síochána secured the site pending the arrival of the AAIU Inspectors.
Probable cause:
The Pilot attempted to land downwind in marginal weather conditions. This resulted in a late go-around during which control was lost due to inadequate airspeed.
Contributory Factors:
1. Communications were not established between the Pilot and EICA thus denying the Pilot the opportunity of being informed of the changed wind conditions and the runway in use.
2. The aircraft was over maximum landing weight.
3. The altimeters were under-reading due to incorrect QNH settings.
4. The additional stress on the Pilot associated with the conduct of a demonstration flight.
Final Report:

Crash of a Fokker F27 Friendship 500RF in Sligo

Date & Time: Nov 2, 2002 at 1702 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-ECAT
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Dublin - Sligo
MSN:
10672
YOM:
1984
Flight number:
ECY406
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
36
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
5710
Captain / Total hours on type:
1176.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
20117
Copilot / Total hours on type:
787
Aircraft flight hours:
27452
Circumstances:
The aircraft, a Fokker F27-500, registration G-ECAT, departed Dublin at 16.05 hrs (local time) for the 4th leg of a Public Service Obligation (PSO) rotation between Sligo in the North West of Ireland and Dublin. The aircraft had earlier departed Sligo for Dublin at 10.00 hrs, returned to Sligo at 12.30 hrs and departed once again for Dublin on time at 14.30 hrs. The Operator held the PSO contract to provide regular air service between Sligo and Dublin and also between Donegal (EIDL) and Dublin. The accident flight was delayed for 10 minutes as the flight to Donegal had been cancelled due to strong crosswinds at Donegal and arrangements had been made to fly these passengers to Sligo and bus them onwards to Donegal. The en-route segment of this flight was uneventful. At 16.22 hrs G-ECAT called Sligo on Tower frequency 122.10 Mhz and requested the latest weather conditions for Sligo. The Tower Controller transmitted the 16.30 hrs actual for Sligo, as presented at Section 1.7 Meteorological Information. At 16.50 hrs, the aircraft was handed over from Shannon Control to Sligo Tower, descending to 3,500 ft to the SLG beacon for NDB/DME approach to RWY 11. Sligo Tower then transmitted the Donegal weather, as presented at Section 1.7 Meteorological Information. At 16.53 hrs, the aircraft called overhead the SLG beacon and was cleared by Sligo Tower for the approach. At 17.00 hrs, G-ECAT reported at the Final Approach Fix (FAF) and was cleared to land by the Tower, giving a wind of 120 degrees 15 kt, gusting 29 kt. At 17.01 hrs, just prior to landing, G-ECAT was given a wind check of 120 degrees 15 kt, gusting 31 kt. At 17.02 hrs the aircraft made an initial touchdown at approximately the mid-point of the runway and appeared to a number of witnesses not to immediately decelerate. The aircraft continued down the runway until it departed the paved surface at the right hand side of the threshold of RWY 29. On seeing the aircraft pass the apron taxiway/runway intersection at an abnormally high speed, the Tower Controller immediately sounded the crash alarm. The aircraft continued on through a prepared run-off area at the end of the runway, for a further 50 metres, before coming to rest (17.02:30 hrs) with the main wheels embedded in boulders that formed part of an embankment leading down to the sea. The main wheels were approximately one metre short of where the boulders fall away into the sea. The nose wheel, cockpit and forward section of the fuselage cleared the top of the boulder embankment and the aircraft tilted approximately 15-20 degrees nose down onto the outgoing tide. Full tide was due at 04.00 hrs the following day at a depth of 3.9 meters. The Tower Controller immediately contacted the Shannon ATC Station Manager advising of the runway excursion and called 999 to request Gardaí, Fire Brigade and Ambulance assistance.
Probable cause:
The probable cause of this accident was a fast, low approach, leading to the aircraft landing late, beyond the normal touch down point, thereby making it impossible to stop the aircraft on the remaining runway available.
Contributory cause:
1. The lack of an adequate overrun area before an aircraft, failing to stop on the runway, enters the sea.
2. The lack of experience of the Operator in scheduled air operations.
3. The changing operational management structure and uncertain nature of the direction of the company with regard to aircraft type and network development.
Final Report:

Crash of a Lockheed L-188AF Electra in Shannon

Date & Time: Mar 1, 1999 at 0846 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N285F
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Cologne - Dublin - Shannon
MSN:
1107
YOM:
1959
Flight number:
EXS6526
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
5000
Captain / Total hours on type:
3200.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
3000
Copilot / Total hours on type:
760
Aircraft flight hours:
65000
Circumstances:
The aircraft (Flight 6526) departed Cologne at 0300 hours and routed directly to Dublin, where, after more than one hours delay due to the late arrival of a freight truck, the aircraft departed for Shannon Airport at 0816 hours. The crew consisted of the First Officer who was the handling pilot on both of these sectors, the Captain who was the non-handling pilot and the Flight Engineer. The take off gross weight was estimated at 83,701 lbs, well below the limiting 116,000 lbs take off weight (MTOW), and the centre of gravity was within limits. The landing weight was estimated at 80,345 lbs, again below the maximum landing weight of 98,102 lbs. The total freight on board was 14,000 lbs, less than half the 33,000 lbs maximum amount permissible. The aircraft reached it's designated altitude of FL120. The crew were handed over to Shannon Approach and given descent clearance. Shannon Approach instructed the crew to keep the speed up (due to an another aircraft behind them) and the aircraft was vectored on an approach to RWY 24. Due to the weather forecast for Shannon the crew decided to conduct the landing with 78% flaps set, rather than the standard 100% flap normally set for landing. During the approach the Captain called 1000 ft above the touchdown zone (TDZ), then 500 ft and every 100 ft thereafter to the Decision Altitude (DA). At an altitude of 700 ft the Ground Proximity Warning (GPWS) horn sounded. The Flight Engineer proceeded to inhibit the GPWS system. Slowing the aircraft to Vma (Maximum Manoeuvering Airspeed) the crew did not carry out the "before landing" checks. Whilst over the RWY threshold the gear warning horn sounded and five seconds later the crew heard a scraping sound and felt severe aircraft vibrations. Realising that the gear was not down the Captain called for a go-around. The First Officer continued to fly the aircraft and was cleared to 3000 ft by ATC. However, during the climb out the aircraft flew into cloud (Instrument Meteorological Conditions) at about 500/600 feet, and simultaneously the propeller assembly and part of No. 3 engine fell to the ground. Electrical power was lost and the only serviceable flight instruments available to the crew was the standby artificial horizon and wet compass. The First Officer relinquished control of the aircraft to the Captain who had great difficulty in maintaining directional control and it took the combined efforts of both pilots to control the excessive yaw through the rudder pedals. In addition, there was insufficient power available to climb to 3000 ft. In fact, less than 2000 ft was attained, as the aircraft commenced a slow difficult turn in a North Easterly direction and towards the high ground west of Limerick city. It was only by further manipulation of the throttles and feathering No. 4 engine that sufficient directional control was recovered, enough to respond to the instructions of the ATC Radar operator. The aircraft was now flying with only No.1 engine fully operative and No. 2 engine producing only half power and much vibration. The Radar operator vectored the aircraft to approach RWY 24 which became visible to the crew. They selected "gear down" and while only 2 of the 3 green landing lights illuminated, the Captain elected to proceed with the landing, with the flaps again set at 78%. This landing was successful, with all the landing gear deploying correctly. The aircraft was evacuated while the airport crash crews stood by.
Probable cause:
The primary responsibility for the safe conduct of a flight rests with the cockpit crew and, in this regard, they have the Aircraft Flight Manual (AFM), company Standard Operating Procedures (SOP's) and other technical manuals at their disposal in the cockpit. In particular, the company lays down the SOP's to be followed by each and every cockpit crew member in the interests of standardisation and flight safety. The implementation of these measures and procedures is carried out by the cockpit crew and they are aided in this process by artificial mechanical/electrical warning systems and audio alerts. In the L188 in question the two audio alert systems consist of a Ground Proximity Warning System (GPWS) and the landing gear warning horn. The GPWS system sounded at about 700' AGL and this should have been sufficient to warn the crew that the landing gear handle was not down and consequently that the undercarriage was not in the landing configuration. The Flight Engineer, however, reached up and inhibited the GPWS. He said he did this because he understood the aircraft to have 78% flap set for landing and that this was why the GPWS warning sounded. He obviously confused this warning with a warning which he would have got below 200 feet radio height when the flaps are set at less than 100% for landing. The fact that this particular aircraft had no FLAP OVERRIDE switch, as the other two similar aircraft in the fleet had, would probably have added to this confusion. Whether the engineer was instructed to inhibit the GPWS by other crew members is not clear from the CVR. In the debrief following the accident the other crew members agreed that the engineer would have been correct in inhibiting the GPWS as they were landing with 78% flaps configuration. They, therefore, also misinterpreted the GPWS warning. Having failed to carry out the landing checks and with the undercarriage not down, the normal undercarriage warning horn should have sounded when the throttles were retarded for landing. However, it is possible to silence this warning in the 78% flap configuration, which would not have been possible if the flaps were set in the normal (100%) configuration for landing. It appears that as the throttles were being retarded the Flight Engineer pressed the warning horn button to prevent the alarm from sounding. Whether he was so instructed is not clear as parts of the CVR tape were difficult to interpret due to its poor quality. During the final stage of landing the throttles were advanced again thus negating the warning cancellation. As the aircraft rounded out for landing the warning horn was again free to sound, and it did, as the throttles were retarded. However, at this stage, there was too little time to lower the undercarriage and five seconds later the propellers stuck the runway surface.
The following findings were identified:
- The aircraft had a valid standard Airworthiness Certificate issued by the United States Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration and had been maintained in accordance with an approved schedule.
- No evidence was found of any technical problems on the aircraft, or its systems, that could have had any bearing on the accident. In addition, the aircraft records show that the aircraft was dispatched on the accident flight with no deferred maintenance items.
- The crew were properly licensed, in accordance with US Federal Aviation Administration Regulations, to undertake this flight.
- The Captain stated that he had slight flu symptoms over the two days prior to the flight but that did not disbar him from undertaking the flight.
- The flight crew consisted of the Captain, First Officer and Flight Engineer. The First Officer was the handling pilot on this flight.
- No emergency call was made to ATC by the Captain or First Officer. The Shannon Radar controller provided invaluable voice and directional assistance to the crew as they struggled to maintain control of their seriously damaged aircraft and this was subsequently acknowledged by the crew.
- The subsequent actions of the crew in landing the aircraft safely from the second approach were commendable.
- The ILS for RWY 24 was fully serviceable.
- Crew fatigue is not considered a factor in this accident as they had sufficient time off duty in the days immediately prior to the flight and their overall flying duties are of average industry standards.
- Debris from the disintegrating No. 3 engine fell to earth on the western side of RWY 24, within the boundaries of Shannon Airport. Fortunately, there was no damage to property or people.
- The selection of 78% flap setting for the landing was in accord with the Operators SOP's for the prevailing landing conditions. However in selecting 78% flap setting the crew were of the mistaken opinion that the GPWS warning horn should be silenced even though the aircraft was not in the landing configuration.
- The Flight Engineer silenced the landing gear warning horn during the approach phase while the engine power levers were being retarded. It is only when these levers were slightly advanced, just before the round-out stage, that the landing warning horn system was again primed and subsequently sounded.
- The normal landing checks were not carried out by the flight crew. Not one crew member realised that the undercarriage gear was not down and locked.
- The crew stated that this was an inexplicable oversight on their part.
Final Report:

Crash of a Britten-Norman BN-2A-26 Islander in Galway

Date & Time: Jul 7, 1980
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
EI-BBR
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
472
YOM:
1975
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
During the takeoff roll, the pilot encountered an unexpected situation and decided to abort. Unable to stop within the remaining distance, the twin engine airplane overran, struck a wall and came to rest. All five occupants were injured and the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a BAe 125-600B at Baldonnel AFB

Date & Time: Nov 27, 1979
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
236
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Baldonnel - Baldonnel
MSN:
25256
YOM:
1971
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The crew was supposed to fly to UK for scheduled maintenance. During the takeoff roll at Baldonnel-Casement Airbase, the airplane collided with a flock of birds. The takeoff procedure was abandoned and the pilot initiated an emergency braking procedure. Unable to stop within the remaining distance, the airplane overran and came to rest. All three crew members escaped uninjured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
Bird strike on takeoff.