Country
code

Gauteng

Crash of a Convair CV-340 in Pretoria: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jul 10, 2018 at 1639 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
ZS-BRV
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Pretoria - Sun City
MSN:
215
YOM:
1954
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
17
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
18240
Captain / Total hours on type:
63.00
Aircraft flight hours:
18115
Circumstances:
On Tuesday 10 July 2018, at approximately 1439Z, two crew members and 17 passengers took off on a ZS-BRV aircraft for a scenic flight from Wonderboom Aerodrome (FAWB) destined for Pilanesberg Aerodrome (FAPN) when the accident occurred. During take-off, the left engine caught fire, however, the crew continued with the flight. They declared an emergency by broadcasting ‘MAYDAY’ and requesting to return to the departure aerodrome. The crew turned to the right with the intention of returning to the aerodrome. However, the left engine fire intensified, causing severe damage to the left wing rear spar and left aileron system, resulting in the aircraft losing height and the crew losing control of the aircraft and colliding with power lines, prior to crashing into a factory building. The footage taken by one of the passengers using their cellphone showed flames coming from the front top side of the left engine cowling and exhaust area after take-off. The air traffic control (ATC) on duty at the time of the accident confirmed that the left engine had caught fire during take-off and that the crew had requested clearance to return to the aerodrome. The ATC then activated the crash alarm and the aircraft was prioritized for landing. During the accident sequence that followed, one passenger (engineer) occupying the jump seat in the cockpit was fatally injured and 18 others sustained injuries. The investigation revealed that during take-off, the left engine had caught fire and the crew had continued with the flight without securing the left engine as prescribed in the aircraft flight manual (AFM). The crew had then declared an emergency and attempted to return to the aerodrome, however, they lost control of the aircraft and collided with power lines prior to crashing into a factory building. Owned by Rovos Air (part of the South African Rovos Rail Group), the aircraft was donated to the Dutch Museum Aviodrome based in Lelystad and has to be transferred to Europe with a delivery date on 23 July 2018. For this occasion, the aircraft was repaint with full Martin's Air Charter colorscheme. Part of the convoy program to Europe, the airplane was subject to several test flights, carrying engineers, technicians, pilots and also members of the Aviodrome Museum.
Probable cause:
During take-off, the left engine caught fire and the crew continued with the flight without securing the left engine as prescribed in the aircraft flight manual (AFM). The crew declared an emergency and attempted to return to the aerodrome, however, they lost control of the aircraft and collided with power lines prior to crashing into a factory building. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Pre-existing damage to the cylinder No 13 piston and ring pack deformation and, most probably, the cylinder No 7’s fractured exhaust valve head that were not detected during maintenance of the aircraft,
- Substandard maintenance for failing to conduct compression tests on all cylinders during the scheduled maintenance prior to the accident,
- Misdiagnosis of the left engine manifold pressure defect as it was reported twice prior to the accident,
- The crew not aborting take-off at 50 knots prior to reaching V1; manifold pressure fluctuation was observed by the crew at 50 knots and that should have resulted in an aborted take-off,
- Lack of crew resource management; this was evident as the crew ignored using the emergency checklist to respond to the in-flight left engine fire,
- Lack of recency training for both the PF and PM, as well as the LAME,
- Non-compliance to Civil Aviation Regulations by both the crew and the maintenance organisation.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna (DMI) Falcon 402 in Lanseria

Date & Time: Dec 13, 2016 at 1530 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
ZU-TVB
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Lanseria - Bazaruto Island
MSN:
402B-1008
YOM:
1975
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from Lanseria bound for Bazaruto Island, Mozambique, the pilot informed ground that the engine failed and elected to return for an immediate landing. On final, the aircraft hit a perimeter fence and crashed in flames near the runway threshold. All three occupants were injured and the aircraft was destroyed by a post crash fire. Built in 1975, this Cessna 402B was equipped with a new turbo engine and redesigned as a single engine Cessna (DMI) Falcon 402 (the C402 is usually a twin engine aircraft).

Crash of a Boeing 737-4L7 in Johannesburg

Date & Time: Oct 26, 2015 at 1206 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
ZS-OAA
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Port Elizabeth - Johannesburg
MSN:
26960/2483
YOM:
1993
Flight number:
BA6234
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
6
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
94
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
9186
Captain / Total hours on type:
2899.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
5817
Copilot / Total hours on type:
480
Aircraft flight hours:
57543
Circumstances:
The aircraft Boeing 737-400, operated by Comair, flight number BA6234, was on a scheduled domestic flight operated under the provisions of Part 121 of the Civil Aviation Regulations (CARs). The aircraft was on the third leg for the day, after it had performed two uneventful legs. According to their recorded flight plan, the first leg departed from King Shaka International Airport (FALE) to O.R. Tambo International Airport (FAOR), the second leg was from FAOR to Port Elizabeth International Airport (FAPE) on the same day, during which the Captain was flying. During this third leg, the aircraft departed from FAPE at 0820Z on an instrument flight plan rule for FAOR. On board were six (6) crew members, ninety four (94) passengers and two (2) live animals. The departure from FAPE was uneventful, whereby the first officer (FO) was the flying pilot (FP) for this leg. During the approach to FAOR, the aircraft was cleared for landing on runway 03R. The accident occurred at approximately 1 km past the threshold. The crew stated that a few seconds after a successful touchdown, they felt the aircraft vibrating, during which they applied brakes and deployed the reverse thrust. The vibration was followed by the aircraft rolling slightly low to the left. It later came to a full stop slightly left of the runway centre line, resting on its right main landing gear and the number one engine, with the nose landing gear in the air. The crash alarm was activated by the FAOR Air Traffic Controller (ATC). The Airport Rescue and Fire Fighting (ARFF) personnel responded swiftly to the scene of the accident. The accident site was then secured with all relevant procedures put in place. The aircraft sustained substantial damage as the number one engine scraped along the runway surface when the landing gear detached from the fuselage. ARFF personnel had to prevent an engine fire in which they saw smoke as a result of runway contact. The occupants were allowed to disembark from the aircraft via the left aft door due to the attitude in which the aircraft came to rest. The accident occurred during daylight meteorological conditions on Runway 03R at O.R. Tambo International Airport (FAOR) located at GPS reading as: S 26°08’01.30” E 028°14’32.34” and the field elevation 5558 ft.
Probable cause:
Unstable approach whereby the aircraft was flared too high with high forward speed resulting with a low sink rate in which during touch down the left landing gear
experienced excessive vibration and failed due to shimmy events.
The following findings were identified:
- According to the FDR recordings, the aircraft flare was initiated earlier at 65ft than at 20ft as recommended by aircraft manufacture, which contributed to the low sink rate.
- The shimmy damper failed the post-accident lab-test and fluid was found in the thermal relief valve, which could have contributed to the shimmy damper failure.
- According to the lab results, significant wear was found on the upper torsion link bushing and flange, which could have contributed to undamped vibration
continuation.
- The aircraft had a tailwind component during landing, which could have prolonged the landing distance.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft C90GTx King Air in Lanseria: 3 killed

Date & Time: Feb 3, 2014 at 0654 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
ZS-CLT
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Johannesburg – Lanseria
MSN:
LJ-2011
YOM:
2011
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
1936
Captain / Total hours on type:
101.00
Aircraft flight hours:
500
Circumstances:
The pilot and two passengers were planning to fly from Rand Airport to Lanseria International Airport (FALA) in the early hours of the morning with the intention to clear customs. It was still dark and the weather forecast thunderstorms with rain for most areas of Gauteng. Rand Tower requested clearance from FAOR approach before departure. The aircraft took off from Runway 29 following the clearance given and proceeded in a westerly direction. At 6500 feet above mean sea level (AMSL), Rand handed the aircraft over to Approach for further clearances. Reported visibility at FALA was 600m and the cloud base was 600 feet AGL. The pilot then requested a VHF Omnidirectional range (VOR) Z approach for Runway 07. He started the approach at 8000 feet and approximately 14nm from LIV. At 12nm and established on Radial 245 Approach handed him over to FALA. Once in contact with FALA the pilot was advised of the heading to turn to at missed approach point (MAP). At MAP the pilot did not have the runway in sight and advised tower that they were going around. They turned left 360° and climbed to 8000 feet as instructed by FALA. FALA handed them back to Approach for repositioning for Radial 245. Approach advised the aircraft that visibility at Wonderboom was better but the pilot said if not successful they would route to Polokwane. At 12nm the aircraft was handed over to FALA. During the descent, the pilot started repeating messages more than twice. Close to MAP the pilot indicated that he had the field in sight. FALA gave them landing clearance. Soon after, the pilot said he did not have it in sight. When FALA instructed him to go around and route Polokwane, the pilot came back on frequency indicating that the aircraft was in distress. After that, the tower heard a loud bang accompanied by black smoke from behind a hangar.
Probable cause:
The accident was the consequence of a stall in adverse weather conditions after the pilot suffered a spatial disorientation during a missed approach procedure.
Final Report:

Ground accident of a Boeing 747-436 in Johannesburg

Date & Time: Dec 22, 2013 at 2243 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
G-BNLL
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Johannesburg – London
MSN:
24054/794
YOM:
1990
Flight number:
BA034
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
17
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
185
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
20050
Captain / Total hours on type:
12500.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
5700
Copilot / Total hours on type:
1400
Aircraft flight hours:
110578
Aircraft flight cycles:
12832
Circumstances:
The British Airways aircraft B747-400, flight number BA034 with registration G-BNLL, was going to embark on a commercial international air transportation long haul flight from FAOR to EGLL. The ATC gave the crew instructions to push back, start and face south, then taxi using taxiway Bravo to the Category 2 holding point for Runway 03L. During the taxi, instead of turning to the left to follow Bravo, the crew continued straight ahead, crossing the intersection of taxiway Bravo and aircraft stand taxilane Mike. After crossing the intersection, still being on Mike, the aircraft collided with a building. An investigation was conducted and several causal factors were determined. Amongst others, it was determined that the crew erred in thinking they were still taxiing on Bravo while in fact they were taxiing on Mike. This mistake, coupled with other contributory factors such as the briefing information, taxi information, ground movement visual aids, confusion and loss of situational awareness led to the collision. All 202 occupants evacuated safely while four people in the building were injured. The aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
The loss of situational awareness caused the crew to taxi straight ahead on the wrong path, crossing the intersection/junction of Bravo and Mike instead of following Bravo where it turns off to the right and leads to the Category 2 holding point. Following aircraft stand taxilane Mike; they collided with a building on the right-hand side of Mike.
Contributory Factors:
- Failure of the crew to carry out a briefing after they had received instruction from ATC that the taxi route would be taxiway Bravo.
- The lack of appropriate knowledge about the taxiway Bravo layout and relevant information (caution notes) on threats or risks to look out for while taxiing on taxiway Bravo en route to the Cat 2 holding point.
- The aerodrome infrastructure problems (i.e. ground movement navigation aids anomalies), which created a sense of confusion during the taxi.
- Loss of situation awareness inside the cockpit causing the crew not to detect critical cues of events as they were gradually unfolding in front of them.
- Failure of the other crew members to respond adequately when the Co-pilot was commenting on the cues (i.e. narrowness and proximity to the building).
- The intersection/junction of Bravo and Mike not being identified as a hotspot area on the charts.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-31-350 Navajo Chieftain in Grand Central

Date & Time: Nov 25, 2012 at 1027 LT
Registration:
ZS-JHN
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Grand Central – Tzaneen
MSN:
31-7405496
YOM:
1974
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
1699
Captain / Total hours on type:
1.00
Aircraft flight hours:
8029
Circumstances:
On the morning of 25 November 2012 at 0902Z the pilot, sole occupant on board the aircraft, took off from FAGC to FATZ. He filed an IFR flight plan to cruise at F110 in controlled airspace. The take-off roll and initial climb from RWY 17 was uneventful and passing FL075 FAGC Tower Controller transferred the aircraft to Johannesburg Approach Control (Approach) on 124.5 MHz. On contact with Approach the pilot was cleared to climb to FL110. On the climb approaching FL090 the aircraft lost power on the left engine, oil pressure dropped and the cylinder head temperature increased. He then advised Approach of the problem and requested to level out at FL090 to attempt to identify the problem. He requested radar vectors from Approach to route direct to FAGC and proceeded to shut down the left engine. The pilot continued routing FAGC using the right engine but was unable to maintain height. He noticed the oil pressure and manifold pressure on the right engine dropping. The pilot also reported seeing fire through the cooling vents of the right engine cowling. The pilot requested distance to FAGC from Approach and was told it is 2.5nm (nautical miles) and the aircraft continued loosing height. An update from Approach seconds later indicated that the aircraft was 1nm from FAGC. The pilot decided to do a wheels up forced landing on an open field when he realized that the aircraft was too low. He landed wheels up in a wings level attitude. The aircraft impacted and skidded across an uneven field and came to a stop 5m from Donovan Street. The pilot disembarked the aircraft and attempted to put out the fire which had started inflight on the right engine but without success. Eventually the right wing and the fuselage were engulfed by fire. Minutes later the FAGC fire department using two vehicles extinguished the fire. The pilot escaped with no injuries and the aircraft was destroyed by the ensuing fire.
Probable cause:
An inspection the left wings outboard tank was full and the main tank was empty. Both fuel selectors were also found on main tanks (left and right) position. Unsuccessful forced landing due to fuel starvation and the cause of the fire was undetermined. The left engine failed because of fuel exhaustion and the cause of fire could not be determined.
Final Report:

Crash of a Swearingen SA226TC Metro II in Lanseria

Date & Time: Jun 13, 2010 at 1100 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
ZS-ZOC
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Lanseria – Polokwane
MSN:
TC-293
YOM:
1979
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
13
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
6900
Captain / Total hours on type:
400.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
1630
Copilot / Total hours on type:
35
Aircraft flight hours:
27532
Aircraft flight cycles:
27353
Circumstances:
Two flight crew members accompanied by thirteen passengers departed from FALA to FAPP. The flight was uneventful until during the approach to land on Runway 05 at FAPP. The flight crew selected landing gear down and observed a red light which indicate undercarriage unsafe. The flight crew reported the situation to FAPP Air Traffic Control (ATC). FAPP ATC gave instruction to do a missed approach at low level fly-past. The intention was to conduct a visual inspection of the undercarriage to determine its condition. The ATC observed that the left main gear had not extended. FAPP ATC gave an instruction to the flight crew, to hold over the beacon (BHV), where they could attempt to extend the gear by means of normal and emergency procedure. The flight crew was not successful and undercarriage remained retracted. The flight crew returned to FALA with the intention to carry out an emergency landing. FALA ATC give instructions to the flight crew to hold over the beacon (LIV), to again attempt the normal and emergency undercarriage extension procedures. But jet again; the flight crew was unsuccessful to lower the left main gear. ATC then instructed that the aircraft should execute the emergency landing on Runway 24R. During short finals overhead the threshold, prior to touchdown, the flight crew shut down both engines, feathered the propellers and switched off all the electronics. The aircraft landed and came to a gradual stop on its lower fuselage on the centreline of the runway.
Probable cause:
The pilot executed a belly “wheels up” emergency landing after the left main landing gear failed to extend.
Contributory Factors:
The new tyres installed on the main landing gear wheels were not in compliance with the instructions of the Fairchild Service Letter 226-SN-131.
Final Report:

Crash of A Piper PA-31-350 in Winterveld

Date & Time: May 7, 2008
Registration:
ZS-KKR
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
31-8052183
YOM:
1980
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
0
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
After landing in Winterveld, the aircraft (a Panther III version) hit a rock on the ground. On impact, the right main gear was torn off. The aircraft veered to the right and came to rest with its right wing severely damaged. Nobody was injured but the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
Hit a rock on the ground after landing.

Ground accident of a BAe 125-400B in Lanseria

Date & Time: Feb 12, 2002 at 0800 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
ZS-JBA
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Lanseria – Blantyre
MSN:
25259
YOM:
1971
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
7881
Captain / Total hours on type:
64.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
13500
Copilot / Total hours on type:
18
Circumstances:
The aircraft was parked on the international departures apron at FALA, ready for a flight from FALA to Blantyre. The pilot assumed that the engineer had pressurised the hydraulic accumulator and therefore did not inspect it himself. When the passengers arrived, the pilot got in the aircraft and began the internal pre-start checks. The co-pilot removed the chocks after boarding the passengers, closed the door and then started to brief the passengers. At that moment the pilot noticed that the aircraft was rolling forward. Attempts to stop the aircraft were unsuccessful, the aircraft rolled forward, narrowly missed a hangar and a parked Bell Long-ranger helicopter next to the hangar, crossed the taxiway and finally stopped when entering a ditch between the taxiway and the runway. The pilot was the holder of a valid transport pilot’s licence and had the type endorsed in his licence. The operation of the hydraulic system was found to be satisfactory. The hand pump was used to pressurise the system after which the brakes could be applied successfully.
Probable cause:
The hydraulic system was not pressurised during the pre-flight inspection of the aircraft. The chocks were therefore removed without adequate hydraulic system pressure available.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna F406 Caravan II in Johannesburg: 3 killed

Date & Time: Nov 2, 2001 at 0320 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
ZS-OIG
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Johannesburg - Windhoek
MSN:
406-0041
YOM:
1989
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
1956
Captain / Total hours on type:
1001.00
Circumstances:
The aircraft departed Johannesburg International Airport at 0119Z on an international cargo flight to Eros, an aerodrome located on the outskirts of Windhoek the capital of Namibia. There were two pilots and a passenger onboard the aircraft as well a substantial amount of cargo, consisting mainly of express freight parcels and two heavy steel bars approximately 3 metres in length each. The aircraft crashed approximately 106 seconds after commencing its take-off roll, impacting the ground in a left wing low attitude approximately 700 metres South of the threshold of runway 03R at Johannesburg International Airport in a marshy area. All three occupants onboard were fatally injured and the aircraft was destroyed.
Probable cause:
The accident resulted due to a loss of control (aircraft becoming uncontrollable in the pitch and roll axis), which occurred approximately 35 to 40 seconds after lift-off/rotation. It was induced and aggravated by a 16% overload condition as well as the exceedance of the certified aft CG limitation of the aircraft. The investigation revealed that the aircraft was overloaded by approximately 16% 699.6kg). The cargo was not secured, nor was there a seat or a restraining device in the aircraft for the passenger that was onboard the ill-fated flight. The last Mandatory Periodic Inspection prior to the accident was certified on 30 May 2001 at 4 353.1 airframe hours, by AMO No. 273. Since the inspection was certified a further 96.6 hours were flown. The Certificate of Airworthiness for the aircraft was invalid at the time of the accident, as both engines have exceeded their TBO (time between overhaul) by approximately 185 hours.
Final Report: