Crash of a Cessna 402C in Monterrey: 3 killed

Date & Time: Oct 17, 2008 at 1210 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
XC-HAQ
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Monterrey – La Paz
MSN:
402C-0521
YOM:
1981
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft departed Monterrey-General Mariano Escobido Airport at 1200LT on a flight to La Paz, Baja California Sur with one passenger and two pilots on board. While climbing in clouds, the aircraft struck the slope of Mt El Fraile. The wreckage was found at the end of the afternoon. The aircraft was destroyed by impact forces and a post crash fire and all three occupants were killed, among them Nabor García Aguirre, Baja California Sur State Government Finance Secretary.
Crew:
Jaime Emilio Real Cosío, pilot,
Armando Ávila Ochoa, copilot.
Passenger:
Nabor García Aguirre.
Probable cause:
Controlled flight into terrain.

Crash of a Learjet 35A in Truckee: 2 killed

Date & Time: Dec 28, 2005 at 1406 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N781RS
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Twin Falls - Truckee - Carlsbad - Monterrey
MSN:
35-218
YOM:
1978
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
4880
Captain / Total hours on type:
2200.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
1650
Copilot / Total hours on type:
56
Aircraft flight hours:
9244
Circumstances:
The airplane collided with the ground during a low altitude, steep banked, base-to-final left turn toward the landing runway during a circling instrument approach. The airplane impacted terrain 1/3-mile from the approach end of runway 28, and north of its extended centerline. A witness, located in the airport's administration building, made the following statement regarding his observations: "I saw the aircraft in and out of the clouds in a close base for [runway] 28. I then saw the aircraft emerge from a cloud in a base to final turn [and] it appeared to be approximately 300-400 feet above the ground. The left wing was down nearly 90 degrees. The aircraft appeared north of the [runway 28] centerline. The aircraft pitched nose down approximately 30-40 degrees and appeared to do a 1/2 cartwheel on the ground before exploding." ATC controllers had cleared the airplane to perform a GPS-A (circling) approach. The published weather minimums for category C and D airplanes at the 5,900-foot mean sea level airport was 3 miles visibility, and the minimum descent altitude was 8,200 feet mean sea level (msl). Airport weather observers noted that when the accident occurred, the visibility was between 1 1/2 and 5 miles. Scattered clouds existed at 1,200 feet above ground level (7,100 feet msl), a broken ceiling existed at 1,500 feet agl (7,400 feet msl) and an overcast condition existed at 2,400 feet agl (8,300 feet msl). During the approach, the first officer acknowledged to the controller that he had received the airport's weather. The airplane overflew the airport in a southerly direction, turned east, and entered a left downwind pattern toward runway 28. A 20- to 30-knot gusty surface wind existed from 220 degrees, and the pilot inadequately compensated for the wind during his base leg-to-final approach turning maneuver. The airplane was equipped with Digital Electronic Engine Controls (DEEC) that recorded specific data bits relating to, for example, engine speed, power lever position and time. During the last 4 seconds of recorded data (flight), both of the power levers were positioned from a mid range point to apply takeoff power, and the engines responded accordingly. No evidence was found of any preimpact mechanical malfunction. The operator's flight training program emphasized that during approaches consideration of wind drift is essential, and a circling approach should not be attempted in marginal conditions.
Probable cause:
The pilot's inadequate compensation for the gusty crosswind condition and failure to maintain an adequate airspeed while maneuvering in a steep turn close to the ground.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft B90 King Air in Pesqueria

Date & Time: Mar 7, 1997 at 1210 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
XB-CIO
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Saltillo - Monterrey
MSN:
LJ-387
YOM:
1969
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
While in cruising altitude on a flight from Saltillo to Monterrey, both engines failed simultaneously. The pilot was able to reduce his altitude and attempted an emergency landing in an open field located near Pesqueria. Both occupants escaped uninjured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
Double engine failure in flight caused by a fuel exhaustion.

Crash of a Beechcraft 200 Super King Air in San Ysidro: 10 killed

Date & Time: Oct 27, 1979 at 2346 LT
Operator:
Registration:
XC-PGR
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Monterrey - Tijuana
MSN:
BB-317
YOM:
1978
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
8
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
10
Captain / Total flying hours:
6425
Captain / Total hours on type:
90.00
Circumstances:
The twin engine airplane was completing a special flight from Monterrey to Tijuana on behalf of the General Attorney of the Republic of Mexico. On final approach to Tijuana-General Abelardo L. Rodriguez Airport, the crew encountered poor weather conditions and failed to realize his altitude was too low when the airplane struck a power pole (14 feet high) and crashed in flames about two miles short of runway threshold, on US territory. The aircraft was totally destroyed and all 10 occupants were killed. At the time of the accident, the visibility was limited to a half of mile due to low ceiling and fog.
Probable cause:
Controlled collision with ground on final approach due to improper IFR operation. The following contributing factors were reported:
- Low ceiling,
- Fog,
- Airport facilities: Instrument Landing System inoperative,
- Limited visibility to half a mile,
- Localizer inop, using VOR/DME.
Final Report:

Crash of a Douglas C-47D near Caño La Raya: 35 killed

Date & Time: Sep 8, 1969 at 1400 LT
Operator:
Registration:
FAC-685-A
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Bogotá – Villavicencio – Orocué – Trinidad – Paz de Ariporo – Tablón de Támara – El Yopal – Aguazul – Tauramena – Monterrey – Apiay
Flight number:
NSE742
Country:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
32
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
35
Circumstances:
On the last leg of the trip NSE742 that originated from Bogotá, the crew started the descent when he encountered stormy weather (heavy rain falls, low clouds and turbulences). While approaching from the east, the airplane struck a rocky peak and crashed near Caño La Raya, some 55 km east of Apiay AFB. The aircraft was totally destroyed and all 35 occupants were killed.
Crew:
Maj Eduardo Antonio Lozano,
Lt Tirso Hernando Martinez, copilot,
Aux Lupo Cieves.

Crash of a Boeing 727-64 in Monterrey: 79 killed

Date & Time: Jun 4, 1969 at 0842 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
XA-SEL
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Mexico City - Monterrey
MSN:
19256/355
YOM:
1967
Flight number:
MX704
Country:
Crew on board:
7
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
72
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
79
Circumstances:
Following an uneventful flight from Mexico City, the crew started the descent to Monterrey-General Mariano Escobido Airport. In a visibility reduced by heavy rain falls, the crew initiated a turn to the left to intercept the glide. After passing over the Monterrey VOR, the aircraft descended with a rate of 1,500 feet per minute when, at a speed of 250 knots, it struck the slope of Cerro del Fraile located some 23 km from the airport. The aircraft disintegrated on impact and all 79 occupants were killed. The wreckage was found at an altitude of 1,800 meters few hours later.
Probable cause:
Wrong approach configuration on part of the flying crew who initiated a turn to the left instead to the right as mentioned in the published procedures. At the time of the accident, the aircraft speed was too high, which was considered as a contributing factor.

Crash of a Douglas DC-3 near Monterrey: 21 killed

Date & Time: Oct 19, 1953 at 0710 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
XC-PMX
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Monterrey – Falcon
Country:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
18
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
21
Circumstances:
The airplane left Monterrey Airport at 0700LT bound for Falcon, Tamaulipas. About ten minutes later, while climbing, the airplane hit the slope of a mountain and crashed into a deep ravine, about 30 km northeast of the airport. All 21 occupants have been killed. Passengers included leading Mexican journalists and entertainers who were on their way to a meeting between President Eisenhower and President Adolfo Ruiz Cortinez of Mexico, taking part to the ceremonies marking the inauguration of the Falcon Dam at the border between USA and Mexico.

Crash of a Lockheed 5B Vega near Monterrey

Date & Time: May 27, 1930
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
XA-BHC
Flight Phase:
MSN:
90
YOM:
1929
Country:
Crew on board:
0
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Crashed in unknown circumstances near Monterrey and was destroyed by fire. Occupant fate unknown.