code

CA

Crash of a Learjet 36 at North Island NAS

Date & Time: Sep 9, 2022 at 1314 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N26FN
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
North Island - North Island
MSN:
36-011
YOM:
1975
Flight number:
FST26
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The airplane departed North Island-Halsey Field NAS at 1222LT on a combined exercice on behalf of the US Navy under callsign FST26. Less than an hour later, the crew initiated the approach to runway 36 in rain falls. After touchdown, the airplane failed to stop within the remaining distance, overran, went down an embankment and came to rest on a beach. Both pilots were slightly injured.

Crash of a Cessna 340A in Watsonville: 2 killed

Date & Time: Aug 18, 2022 at 1456 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N740WJ
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Turlock – Watsonville
MSN:
340A-0740
YOM:
1979
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
On final approach to Watsonville Airport, at a height of 200 feet, the twin engine airplane collided with a private Cessna 152 registered N49931 and carrying one pilot. Following the collision, the Cessna 152 crashed in a grassy area near the runway, bursting into flames. The Cessna 340 crashed on the runway, veered off and came to rest into a hangar. All three occupants in both aircraft were killed.

Crash of a Cessna 208B Grand Caravan in Oceanside: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jun 3, 2022 at 1346 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N7581F
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Oceanside - Oceanside
MSN:
208B-0389
YOM:
1994
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The single engine was completing local skydiving flights out from Oceanside Airport. On final approach to runway 25, the airplane apparently stalled and crashed against an embankment located about 400 metres short of runway. The pilot was seriously injured and the jumpmaster was killed.

Crash of a Learjet 35A in Santee: 4 killed

Date & Time: Dec 27, 2021 at 1914 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N880Z
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Santa Ana - Santee
MSN:
35A-591
YOM:
1985
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
On December 27, 2021, about 1914 Pacific standard time, a Gates Learjet Corporation 35A, N880Z, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near El Cajon, California. The 2 pilots, and 2 flight nurses were fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 repositioning flight. Earlier in the day, the flight crew had flown from Lake Havasu City Airport (HII), Lake Havasu, Arizona, to John Wayne / Orange County Airport (SNA), Santa Ana, California, for a patient transfer. They departed SNA about 1856 to reposition to their home base at Gillespie Field (SEE), El Cajon, California. Review of preliminary communication recordings revealed that at 1908:23, the pilot contacted the SEE Air Traffic Control Tower (ATCT) and reported to the controller they were on the GPS approach to runway 17. The controller issued the current wind and cleared the pilot to land on runway 17. At 1912:03, the pilot reported the airport in sight and requested to squawk VFR. The controller did not acknowledge the request to squawk VFR, however, he reissued the landing clearance for runway 17. At 1912:13, the pilot requested to land on runway 27. The controller asked the pilot if they wanted to cancel their IFR flight plan, to which the pilot replied, “yes sir.” The controller acknowledged that the IFR cancelation was received and instructed the pilot to overfly the field and enter left traffic for runway 27R and cleared them to land runway 27R. At 1912:30, the pilot requested that the runway lights for runway 27R be increased, however, the controller informed them that the lights were already at 100 percent. Preliminary Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) data showed that after departure from SNA, the flight made a left turn out over the waters of the Pacific Ocean and flew generally south – southeast along the coast and ascended to a cruise barometric altitude of about 11,000 ft sea level (MSL). After the flight passed Carlsbad, California, the airplane turned left and began to descend toward SEE. As shown in figure 1, ADS-B data showed that the airplane overflew SEE at a barometric altitude of about 775 ft MSL (407 ft above ground level) and entered a left downwind for runway 27R. While on the downwind leg, the airplane descended to a barometric altitude of 700 ft MSL, then ascended to a barometric altitude of 950 ft MSL while on the base leg. The last recorded ADS-B target was at 1914:09, at a barometric altitude of 875 ft MSL. Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane struck a set of power lines and subsequently impacted the yard of a residential home about 1.43 nautical miles east of the approach end of runway 27R. The airplane came to rest upright on a heading of about 118°, at an elevation of about 595 ft msl. The wreckage debris path was oriented on a heading of about 310° and was about 186 ft long and 90 ft wide. All major structural components of the airplane were located throughout the wreckage debris path. The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination. At 1855, recorded weather data at SEE showed weather conditions were variable wind at 5 knots, visibility of 3 statute miles, mist, broken cloud layer at 2,000 ft, overcast cloud layer at 2,600 ft, temperature of 10° C, dew point temperature of 8° C, and an altimeter setting of 29.98 inches of mercury. No precipitation was indicated. At 1955, SEE reported a variable wind of 5 knots, visibility 3 statute miles, mist, broken cloud layer at 1,100 ft, overcast cloud layer at 2,600 ft, temperature of 10°C, dew point temperature of 8°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.96 inches of mercury. No precipitation was indicated.

Crash of a PZL-Mielec AN-2T in Alta Mesa

Date & Time: Oct 14, 2021 at 1600 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N857PF
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
1G108-57
YOM:
1969
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On October 14, 2021 at 1600 Pacific daylight time, a WSK Mielec AN-2TD, N857PF, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Wilton, California. The pilot and one passenger sustained serious injuries and the other two passengers sustained minor injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. The pilot stated that he configured the airplane for takeoff and had flaps down and the elevator trim was neutral. The departure started normally and after becoming airborne, the airplane controls were not responding to his inputs as expected. The airplane continued to pitch up in a nose-high attitude and he was unable to push the control yoke forward which he described as feeling like he was “stretching” cables with forward pressure. The pilot set the electric trim to full nose-down and it made no effect. With the airplane’s pitch uncontrollable, he saw an open area and elected to make a rapid maneuver toward the area. He added full left rudder and aileron and the airplane banked left. The airplane descended into trees and after coming to a stop, a fire erupted. The back door would not open due the deformation of the airframe and the broke a front window. The pilot and passengers all climbed out the window and the airplane continued to burn. There were two witnesses located at the airport that took videos of the airplane departing. One video showed the airplane just prior to the takeoff roll. The tailwheel is positioned backward and as the airplane starts the roll, the tailwheel swivel and the airplane moves to the right of the runway. The airplane then veered to the left of the runway and became airborne shortly thereafter. In the approximate 10 seconds that followed, the airplane pitched up at an increasingly higher and higher angle-of-attack. The airplane then made a sharp left turn and goes behind the tress as it descends.

Crash of a Cessna 340A in Santee: 2 killed

Date & Time: Oct 11, 2021 at 1214 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N7022G
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Yuma – San Diego
MSN:
340A-0695
YOM:
1979
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
On October 11, 2021, at 1214 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 340A, N7022G, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Santee, California. The pilot and one person on the ground were fatally injured, and 2 people on the ground sustained serious injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. The flight departed from Yuma International Airport (NYL), Yuma, AZ at 1121 mountain daylight time and was destined for Montgomery-Gibbs Executive Airport (MYF), San Diego, California. Review of Federal Aviation Administration Southern California Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON) facilities and recorded Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) data revealed that at 1203:58, the controller broadcasted a weather update for MYF and reported the visibility was 10 miles, ceiling 1,700 ft broken, overcast skies at 2,800 ft, and runway 23 was in use. At 1209:20, the controller issued instructions to the pilot to turn right to a 259° heading to join final, to which the pilot acknowledged while at an altitude of 3,900 ft mean sea level (msl). About 28 seconds later, the pilot queried the controller and asked if he was cleared for the ILS Runway 28R approach, with no response from the controller. At 1210:04, the controller told the pilot that he was 4 miles from PENNY intersection and instructed him to descend to 2,800 ft until established on the localizer, and cleared him for the ILS 28R approach, circle to land runway 23. The pilot partially read back the clearance, followed by the controller restating the approach clearance. The pilot acknowledged the clearance a second time. At this time, the ADS-B data showed the airplane on a westerly heading, at an altitude of 3,900 ft msl. Immediately following a traffic alert at 1211:19, the controller queried the pilot and stated that it looked like the airplane was drifting right of course and asked him if he was correcting. The pilot responded and stated “correcting, 22G.” About 9 seconds later, the pilot said [unintelligible], VFR 23, to which the controller told the pilot he was not tracking the localizer and canceled the approach clearance. The controller followed by issuing instructions to climb and maintain 3,000 ft, followed by the issuance of a low altitude alert, and stated that the minimum vectoring altitude in the area was 2,800 ft. The pilot acknowledged the controller’s instructions. At that time, ADS-B data showed the airplane on a northwesterly heading, at an altitude of 2,400 ft msl. At 1212:12, the controller instructed the pilot to climb and maintain 3,800, to which the pilot responded “3,800, 22G.” ADS-B data showed that the airplane was at 3,550 ft msl. About 9 seconds later, the controller issued the pilot instructions to turn right to 090° for vectors to final, to which the pilot responded “090 22G.” At 1212:54, the controller instructed the pilot to turn right to 090° and climb immediately and maintain 4,000 ft. The pilot replied shortly after and acknowledged the controller’s instructions. About 3 seconds after the pilot’s response, the controller told the pilot that it looked like he was descending and that he needed to make sure he was climbing, followed by an acknowledgment from the pilot. At 1213:35, the controller queried the pilot about his altitude, which the pilot responded 2,500 ft. The controller subsequently issued a low altitude alert and advised the pilot to expedite the climb to 5,000 ft. No further communication was received from the pilot despite multiple queries from the controller. ADS-B data showed that the airplane continued a right descending turn until the last recorded target, located about 1,333 ft northwest of the accident site at an altitude of 1,250 ft msl. Figure 1 provides an overview of the ADS-B flight track, select ATC communications, and the location of the destination and surrounding area airports. Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane impacted a residential street on a heading of about 113° magnetic heading. The debris path, which consisted of various airplane, vehicle, and residential structure debris was about 475 ft long and 400 ft wide, oriented on a heading of about 132°. Numerous residential structures exhibited impact related damage and or fire damage. All major structural components of the airplane were located throughout the debris path.

Crash of a Canadair CL-605 Challenger in Truckee: 6 killed

Date & Time: Jul 26, 2021 at 1319 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N605TR
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Coeur d'Alene - Truckee
MSN:
5715
YOM:
2008
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Circumstances:
On July 26, 2021, about 1318 pacific daylight time, a Bombardier Inc., CL-600-2B16 airplane, N605TR, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Truckee-Tahoe Airport (TRK), Truckee, California. The pilot, co-pilot and 4 passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. According to automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) data and preliminary air traffic control (ATC) audio from the Federal Aviation Administration, the airplane departed Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, about 1145 and made a left turn to the south. The flight crew was in contact with ATC throughout the duration of the flight. As the airplane was passing over northwestern Nevada, ATC began issuing descent instructions for the airplane’s approach into TRK. Once the airplane descended below 26,000 ft, ATC advised the flight crew to expect the RNAV (GPS) Runway 20 approach at TRK. The flight crew accepted the approach, but requested to circle to runway 11 for the longer runway and the controller told them to expect the circling approach. After coordinating with the TRK tower, the controller informed the flight crew that they would be number two for TRK and could expect some delays. ATC then cleared the airplane to hold north of the ALVAA waypoint, the initial approach fix to the RNAV runway 20 approach. After one turn in holding, ATC cleared the airplane for the RNAV runway 20 approach, cancelled radar services, and instructed the pilot to contact the TRK tower. The flight crew established communication with the TRK tower controller when they were near the LUMMO waypoint, located about 9.6 nm north of the approach end of runway 20. The tower controller offered the flight crew the option of crossing over the field and enter the left downwind leg for runway 29 or to enter downwind leg for runway 11. Once the flight crew announced they were making a right turn and reported runway 11 in sight, the controller then cleared them to land on runway 11 and informed them that the airplane was not in sight. The flight crew acknowledged the clearance, which was their final radio communication. Multiple eyewitnesses observed the airplane before the crash. Some reported that the airplane caught their attention because of its low altitude and abnormal flight path into runway 11. According to witnesses, the airplane was in a nose down attitude and steep left turn during its last few seconds of flight. A witness located about 50 ft from the accident site reported that he observed the airplane come from the northwest about 20 ft above the trees. The airplane then entered a steep left turn and banked erratically just before it impacted trees and then the ground. The witnesses close to the accident site stated that the airplane appeared intact when they first observed it. Three surveillance videos captured the accident flight’s final movements and were all consistent with the witness’ recounts. The accident site was located on a hillside between a golf course fairway and a residential street. The airplane was consumed by postcrash fire. A debris path, which measured about 225 ft long and 85 ft wide was marked by several broken trees and was oriented on an easterly heading. The initial point of impact was identified by a severed tree that stood about 70 ft tall, located about 120 ft west of the main wreckage. Portions of the right and left wings and control surfaces were found fragmented along the debris path. Additional airframe fragments were collocated with the main wreckage, which was comprised of both engines, the empennage, and fuselage remnants.

Crash of a Cessna 421C Golden Eagle III in Monterey: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jul 13, 2021 at 1042 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N678SW
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Monterey – Salinas
MSN:
421C-1023
YOM:
1981
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
On July 13, 2021 about 1042 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 421C, N678SW, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Monterey, California. The pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Review of recorded communication from the Monterey air traffic control tower revealed that the pilot canceled their initial instrument flight rules (IFR) clearance and requested a Visual Flight Rules (VFR) on top clearance. The controller subsequently issued a VFR-ON-TOP clearance via the Monterey Five departure procedure, which included instructions to turn left after takeoff to join the Salinas very high frequency omni directional range (VOR) 264° radial. The controller issued a clearance for takeoff and shortly after, instructed the pilot to contact the Oakland Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC). Review of recorded communication from the Oakland ARTCC revealed that the pilot established radio communication with the Oakland ARTCC controller as the airplane ascended through 1,700 ft msl. The controller noticed the airplane was turning in the wrong direction and issued an immediate right turn to a heading of 030° which was acknowledged by the pilot. The controller then immediately issued two low altitude alerts with no response from the pilot. No further radio communication with the pilot was received. Recorded Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) showed that the airplane departed from runway 10R at 1738:44 and ascended to 1,075 ft msl before a right turn was initiated. The data showed that at 1740:14, the airplane continued to
ascend in a right turn and reached an altitude of 2,000 ft msl before a descent began. The data showed that the airplane continued descending right turn until ADS-B contact was lost at 1740:38, at an altitude of 775 ft, about 520 ft southwest of the accident site. A witness located near the accident site reported that he observed the accident airplane descend below the cloud layer in a nose low attitude with the landing gear retracted. The witness stated that the airplane made a right descending turn and impacted the top of a pine tree before it traveled below the tree line, followed by the sound of an explosion. The preliminary weather for the MRY airport reported that at 1054 PDT, winds from 280° at 7 knots, visibility of 9 statute miles, ceiling overcast at 800 feet agl, temperature of 15°C and dew point temperature of 11°C, altimeter setting of 29.99 inches of mercury, remarks included: station with a precipitation discriminator. Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane impacted trees about 1 mile south of the departure end of runway 10R. The first identifiable point of contact (FIPC) was a 50 to 75 ft tall tree that had damaged limbs near the top of the tree. The debris path was oriented on a heading of about 067° and was about 995 ft in length from the FIPC, as seen in figure 2. The main wreckage was located about 405 ft from the FIPC. Various portions of aluminum wing skin, right wing, flap, aileron, engine, propeller blades, and propeller hub were observed throughout the debris path. Additionally, several trees were damaged throughout the debris path. The fuselage came to rest upright against a residential structure on a heading of about 045° magnetic at an elevation of 447 ft msl. The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Crash of a Piper PA-46R-350T Matrix in Tehachapi: 1 killed

Date & Time: Feb 13, 2021 at 1627 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N40TS
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Camarillo – Mammoth Lakes
MSN:
46-92156
YOM:
2010
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
On February 13, 2021, about 1627 Pacific standard time, a Piper PA46R-350T airplane, N40TS, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Tehachapi, California. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Preliminary flight track data revealed the airplane departed from Camarillo Airport (CMA), Camarillo, California, earlier that afternoon and traveled northeast climbing to about 10,000 ft mean sea level (msl). About 20 minutes into the flight, the airplane’s ground speed decreases followed by the airplane’s altitude decreasing to about 8,000 ft msl. The flight continued for about 12 minutes before dropping off radar. The final portion of the track showed the airplane in a steep descending left spiral. Weather in the area of the accident site was reported as marginal visual flight rules (mvfr) due to low ceilings and visibility in light rain and mist with winds reported at 40 knots. The National Weather Service had advisories current for turbulence over the region and included G-AIRMET Tango and a Center Weather Advisory (CSA) which bordered the area for severe turbulence below 15,000 ft. Concerned family members contacted the Federal Aviation Administration the following day and an Alert Notice (ALNOT) was issued for the missing airplane. The airplane was found on the morning of February 15th, in rugged steep terrain. According to a family member, the pilot had flown this regular flight to Mammoth Yosemite Airport (MMH), Mammoth Lakes, California, where he had a home in the area. The family member also stated that the pilot had flown his helicopter for about an hour with his flight instructor before departing on the accident flight. A postaccident examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane impacted a steep north facing slop. The airplane was found in several sections and postcrash fire damage was concentrated to the cabin section and inboard wings. All of the airplane’s flight controls were found at the accident site.

Crash of a Dassault Falcon 900EX in San Diego

Date & Time: Feb 13, 2021 at 1150 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N823RC
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
San Diego - Kona
MSN:
201
YOM:
2008
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On February 13, 2021 about 1150 Pacific standard time, a Dassault Falcon 900EX, N823RC (formerly N718AK) was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident in San Diego, California. The two pilots, one additional crew member and two passengers were not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 flight. The flight was being operated as an instrument flight rules cross-country flight from Montgomery Executive Airport (KMYF), San Diego, California, to Kailua/Kona Airport (PHKO), Kailua/Kona, Hawaii. Reportedly, the flight crew was unable to raising the nose of the airplane at rotation speed (VR). The crew subsequently aborted the takeoff; however, the airplane overran the end of the runway and came to rest approximately 560 ft beyond the departure end of the runway. All five occupants evacuated safely and the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.