code

CA

Crash of a Cessna 510 Citation Mustang in El Monte

Date & Time: Aug 31, 2019 at 1113 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N551WH
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
El Monte - Thermal
MSN:
510-0055
YOM:
2008
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
For unknown reasons, the airplane failed to takeoff from runway 01 at El Monte-San Gabriel Valley Airport and overran. It struck a perimeter fence, lost its undercarriage and came to rest with its right wing partially torn off. Both occupants were slightly injured.

Crash of a Cessna 560XL Citation Excel in Oroville

Date & Time: Aug 21, 2019 at 1130 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N91GY
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Oroville - Portland
MSN:
560-5314
YOM:
2003
Flight number:
DPJ91
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
8
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
During the takeoff roll, the crew encountered an unexpected situation, decided to abandon the procedure and initiated an emergency braking maneuver. Unable to stop within the remaining distance, the aircraft overran and came to a halt in an area of dry grass where a fire broke out. All 10 occupants evacuated the cabin and were unhurt while the aircraft was destroyed by fire.

Crash of a Beechcraft B60 Duke in Fullerton: 1 killed

Date & Time: Apr 18, 2019 at 1950 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N65MY
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Fullerton - Heber City
MSN:
P-314
YOM:
1975
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from runway 24 at Fullerton Airport, while climbing to a height of 50 feet at a speed of 69 knots, the twin engine airplane went out of control and crashed in flames onto the runway. The aircraft was destroyed and the pilot, sole on board, was killed.

Crash of a Cessna 414A Chancellor in Yorba Linda: 5 killed

Date & Time: Feb 3, 2019 at 1345 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N414RS
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Fullerton - Fullerton
MSN:
414A-0821
YOM:
1981
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:
On February 3, 2019, at 1345 Pacific standard time, a Cessna 414, N414RS, experienced an inflight breakup over Yorba Linda, California, about 11 miles west of the departure airport Fullerton Municipal Airport (FUL), Fullerton, California. The pilot and four individuals on the ground sustained fatal injuries, two individuals on the ground sustained serious injuries and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by the private pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 cross-country personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed over the accident location, and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed at 1339, with a planned destination of Minden-Tahoe Airport (MEV), Minden, Nevada. Radar and audio communications data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that after departing FUL, the pilot initiated a climbing left turn to the east. Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) existed at the departure airport, however, preliminary information indicated that the weather transitioned to instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) with precipitation, microburst and rain showers over the accident area. During the takeoff clearance, the FUL tower air traffic controller cautioned the pilot regarding deteriorating weather, about 4 miles east of FUL. Radar data showed that 5 1/2 minutes after takeoff, the airplane had climbed to an altitude of about 7,800 ft above ground level before it started a rapid descending right turn and subsequently impacted the ground. Numerous witnesses who were located near the accident site, saw the airplane exit the clouds at a high rate of descent before parts of the airplane started to break off. One witness reported that he, "observed an aircraft emerge from the overcast layer on a northwesterly heading with a nose down pitch of approximately 60 degrees, pointed directly at my location with no discernable movement. It remained in that attitude for approximately 4 to 5 seconds before initiating a high-speed dive recovery. Approaching the bottom of the recovery the aircraft began to roll to its right. As it did, the left horizontal stabilizer departed the aircraft, immediately followed by the remainder of the empennage. The left wing then appeared to shear off just outside of the number one (left) engine igniting the left wing. After which, the aircraft disappeared behind the hill to the northeast of the observed location, trailing flames behind it. The sound of an explosion and large plume of black smoke immediately followed." Examination of the accident site revealed that the wreckage debris was scattered throughout a neighborhood area about 1,000 ft long and 800 ft wide on a south-to-north orientation. At the far south parameter of the debris field were tail sections. The far north area contained the left engine, and left propeller and the fuselage. About 700 ft north-east from the first recovered piece of debris, the right engine and the right propeller impacted an asphalt road, and came to rest in a nearby front yard. The left wing was found about 716 ft north of the first recovered piece of debris, about 140 ft south-west of a burned house. Within the house, fragments of the outboard right wing (which also contained the fuel tank) were located. The fuselage with the attached right inboard wing, along with the left propeller and left engine were located about 310 ft downhill from the burned house on a heading of 310°. The wreckage was recovered and moved to a secure location for future examination.

Crash of a Cessna 414 Chancellor in Santa Ana: 5 killed

Date & Time: Aug 5, 2018 at 1229 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N727RP
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Concord – Santa Ana
MSN:
414-0385
YOM:
1973
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:
The aircraft was destroyed when it impacted the ground in a shopping mall parking lot in Santa Ana, California. The private pilot and four passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Category III Aviation Corporation under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, as a business flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the cross-country flight. The flight departed Buchanan Field Airport (CCA), Concord, California, about 1022 and was destined for John Wayne-Orange County Airport (SNA), Santa Ana, California. A review of the SNA Air Traffic Control Tower (ATCT) audio tape revealed that the pilot established contact with the control tower controller when he was west of the airport descending to 1,700 ft mean sea level (msl). The pilot was told to expect right traffic to runway 20R. The controller then queried the pilot to determine if he could accept runway 20L, and the pilot responded that he was unable to land on runway 20L. The controller then instructed the pilot to hold over the South Coast Plaza, a local holding point for aircraft operating under visual flight rules (VFR), and to conduct left 360° turns for sequencing. When the accident airplane arrived at the holding point, the pilot responded that he could accept runway 20L for landing. The pilot was then instructed to continue his turn to accomplish a left 270° turn and to cross mid-field at or above 1,300 ft msl, for left traffic to runway 20L. The pilot acknowledged that instruction. The controller then instructed the pilot to climb to 1,300 ft msl. A review of the preliminary radar data showed that at 1228, the airplane was about 1-mile northwest of SNA, traveling eastbound at an altitude of about 1,000 ft msl. The airplane began a left turn and the last radar return was recorded at 1229. At this time, the airplane was descending through an altitude of about 494 ft msl. Multiple witnesses near the accident site observed the airplane enter the left bank turn and shortly thereafter, they observed the bank angle increase and the airplane descend towards the ground at a steep angle. During the descent, the pilot transmitted "emergency" three times. The airplane did not recover from the descent and collided with several vehicles in a shopping mall parking lot before coming to rest upright about 35 ft from the entrance of a major store.Examination of the accident site by the National Transportation Safety Board investigators revealed that that all major components of the airplane were located throughout the 150 ft long debris path.

Crash of a GippsAero GA10 Airvan near Mojave

Date & Time: Jun 4, 2018 at 1100 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-XMH
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Mojave - Mojave
MSN:
GA10-TP450-16-101
YOM:
2016
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The crew departed Mojave Air & Space Port on a test flight part of the certification program. En route, the pilots encountered an unexpected situation and decided to abandon the aircraft and to bail out. While both pilots were found uninjured, the aircraft dove into the ground and crashed in a desert area located 15 miles from Edwards AFB and was totally destroyed.

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-6 Twin Otter 300 at Perris Valley

Date & Time: May 24, 2017 at 1515 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N708PV
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Perris Valley - Perris Valley
MSN:
489
YOM:
1976
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3358
Captain / Total hours on type:
2131.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
1893
Copilot / Total hours on type:
12
Aircraft flight hours:
37885
Circumstances:
The pilot of the twin-engine, turbine-powered airplane reported that, while providing flights for skydivers throughout the day, he had a potential new hire pilot flying with him in the right seat. He added that, on the eighth flight of the day, the new pilot was flying during the approach and "approximately 200 feet south from the threshold of [runway] 15 at approximately 15 feet AGL [above ground level] the bottom violently and unexpectedly dropped out. [He] believe[d] some kind of wind shear caused the aircraft [to] slam onto [the] runway and bounce into the air at a 45 to 60-degree bank angle to the right." The prospective pilot then said, "you got it." The pilot took control of the airplane and initiated a go-around by increasing power, which aggravated the "off runway heading." The right wing contacted the ground, the airplane exited the runway to the right and impacted a fuel truck, and the right wing separated from the airplane. The impact caused the pilot to unintentionally add max power, and the airplane, with only the left engine functioning, ground looped to the right, coming to rest nose down.
Probable cause:
The prospective pilot's improper landing flare and the pilot's delayed remedial action to initiate a go-around, which resulted in a runway excursion.
Final Report: