Crash of a Cessna 525B Citation CJ3 in Pasco

Date & Time: Sep 20, 2022 at 0709 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N528DV
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Chehalis - Pasco
MSN:
525B-0329
YOM:
2009
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
8
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On approach, the crew apparently encountered technical problems with the landing gear that could not be lowered. The airplane landed on its belly on runway 03L and slid for few hundred metres before coming to rest, bursting into flames. All 10 occupants evacuated safely and the aircraft was destroyed by a post crash fire.

Crash of a Cessna 340 in Covington: 2 killed

Date & Time: Apr 21, 2022 at 1905 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N84GR
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
MSN:
340-0178
YOM:
1973
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from Covington Airport Runway 10, while in initial climb, the twin engine airplane went out of control and crashed on the General Mills Plant located about 1,5 km southeast of the airfield, bursting into flames. The aircraft was destroyed and both occupants were killed. There were no casualties on the ground.

Crash of a Learjet 75 in Morristown

Date & Time: Apr 2, 2022 at 1119 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N877W
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Atlanta – Morristown
MSN:
45-496
YOM:
2014
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Following an uneventful flight from Atlanta-Fulton County-Brown Field, Georgia, the crew was cleared to land on runway 23 at Morristown Municipal Airport, NJ. After touchdown, the airplane deviated to the right and veered off runway. While contacting soft ground, both wings (the entire wing structure) detached and the aircraft came to rest on its right side in a grassy area. All four occupants escaped with minor injuries and the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Beechcraft B250GT Super King Air in Piracicaba: 7 killed

Date & Time: Sep 14, 2021 at 0840 LT
Registration:
PS-CSM
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
MSN:
BY-364
YOM:
2019
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
7
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from Piracicaba Airport Runway 35, while climbing, the twin engine aircraft entered a right turn, descended to the ground and crashed in a eucalyptus forest located about 1,5 km north of the airport. The aircraft exploded on impact and was totally destroyed. All seven occupants were killed among them the Brazilian businessman Celso Silveira Mello Filho aged 73 who was travelling with his wife and three kids.
Crew:
Celso Elias Carloni, pilot,
Giovani Dedini Gulo, copilot.
Passengers:
Celso Silveira Mello Filho,
Maria Luiza Meneghel,
Celso Meneghel Silveira Mello,
Camila Meneghel Silveira Mello Zanforlin,
Fernando Meneghel Silveira Mello.

Crash of a Cessna 560XLS+ Citation Excel in Plainville: 4 killed

Date & Time: Sep 2, 2021 at 0951 LT
Registration:
N560AR
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Plainville – Manteo
MSN:
560-6026
YOM:
2009
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
On September 2, 2021, at 0951 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 560XL airplane, N560AR, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Farmington, Connecticut. The two pilots and two passengers were fatally injured. One person on the ground sustained serious injuries and three people sustained minor injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. The flight crew had filed an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan from Robertson Field Airport (4B8), Plainville, Connecticut to Dare County Regional Airport (MQI), Manteo, North Carolina. After obtaining their IFR clearance from air traffic control, the flight crew taxied the airplane onto runway 2 for departure. Two witnesses observed the takeoff roll with one reporting the airplane was “going slower” than they had seen during previous takeoffs. When the airplane was about 2/3 down the runway, one witness noted a puff of blue colored smoke from the back side of the airplane. The other witness stated that the nose landing gear was still on the ground as the airplane passed a taxiway intersection near the mid-point of the runway and he said to a friend with him that something was wrong. A third witness, who was beyond the departure end of the runway, noted the airplane departed the runway in a level attitude. After clearing the runway, the airplane’s nose pitched up, but the airplane was not climbing. The airplane then impacted a powerline pole, which caused a small explosion near the right engine followed by a shower of softball-size sparks. After hitting the pole, the noise of the engine went from normal sounding to a much more grinding, metallic sound. The airplane then began to oscillate about its pitch and roll axis before the witness lost sight of it behind trees. Postaccident examination of the 3,665-ft-long runway revealed tire skid marks from the right main landing gear tire that were right of the runway centerline beginning about 2,360 ft from the approach end of the runway. The mark from the right tire continued, while a mark from the left main landing gear tire was noted left of runway centerline beginning about 2,480 ft from the approach end of the runway. The marks from both main landing gear tires continued and veered slightly to the right but were continuous from where first observed to the end of the runway and onto a short width of grass immediately adjacent to the departure end of the runway. The grassy terrain beyond the departure end of the runway then sloped steeply downward toward a road, and the elevation change between the runway area and the road was about 20 ft. An approximate 3-ft-long section of airplane’s right inboard flap was found near the damaged power pole, which was located about 361 ft beyond the departure end of the runway. A ground scar was located in a grassy area adjacent to a building, about 850 ft north of the damaged power pole. The airplane subsequently impacted the building, and the cockpit, cabin, and wings were nearly consumed by the postimpact fire; the aft empennage, which remained outside the building, was relatively intact. Examination of the airframe revealed no evidence of any anomalies with any of the airplane’s primary or secondary flight control surfaces. Additionally, the parking brake handle in the cockpit, and the respective valve that it controlled, were both found in the brake set position. According to preliminary data recovered from the airplane’s flight data recorder (FDR), both thrust levers were set at 66°, and both engines remained at 91% N1 throughout the takeoff roll. While at an airspeed of about 100 knots, the elevator control surface position increased to a positive value, reaching about 16°. At this time the pitch of the airplane minimally changed to about +1°. The weight-on-wheels (WOW) indication remained in an on-ground state until beyond the departure end of the runway where the terrain began sloping downward. After departing the runway at an indicated airspeed of about 120 knots, the elevator position increased to a maximum recorded value of about 17° deflection, the airplane’s pitch rapidly increased to about +22°. Immediately thereafter the elevator position rapidly decreased to about -1.0° and the stick shaker (aerodynamic stall warning) activated. The FDR data further indicated that at about the time the WOW indication transitioned from on-ground to an in-air state, the airspeed accelerated from about 120 knots to a maximum airspeed of 123.75 knots. Additionally, the right engine fuel flow, N1, and N2 decreased with corresponding ITT increase about 1.8 seconds after the WOW transition. Given the airplane’s velocity between these two times, the deceleration of the right engine occurred when it was in close proximity to the power pole. Parking brake valve position and normal brake application were not recorded by the FDR, and the airplane’s takeoff configuration warning system did not incorporate parking brake valve position as part of its activation logic. Further review of the FDR data revealed that the longitudinal acceleration values recorded during the takeoff roll of the accident flight (0.245g) were less than the recorded values for the airplane’s two previous takeoffs (0.365g and 0.35g). Additionally, the time the airplane took to accelerate from 20 to 100 kts during the accident flight and the previous two takeoffs were 17 seconds, 11.5 seconds, and 12 seconds, respectively. Additionally, the elevator position and pitch attitude of the airplane at rotation during its previous takeoff were about 13°, and +1.6°, respectively. The pitch attitude then continued to increase to +10° and remained at that value as the airspeed increased and the elevator position decreased.

Crash of a Learjet 25B in Toluca

Date & Time: Apr 18, 2021 at 1527 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
XB-PIZ
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Cancún - Toluca
MSN:
25-193
YOM:
1975
Location:
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Following an uneventful flight from Cancún, the crew encountered technical problems with the undercarriage while on approach to Toluca-Licenciado Adolfo López Mateos. Decision was taken to complete a belly landing on runway 15/33. The airplane slid for few dozen metres before coming to rest, bursting into flames. All 9 occupants evacuated safely and the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Embraer EMB-500 Phenom 100 in São Pedro

Date & Time: Oct 30, 2020 at 1815 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
PR-LMP
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Belo Horizonte – São Pedro
MSN:
500-00094
YOM:
2009
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
While approaching São Pedro Airport by night, the aircraft crashed in a wooded area short of the airfield, bursting into flames. All four occupants evacuated the cabin and the aircraft was totally destroyed by a post crash fire.

Crash of a Piper PA-31T Cheyenne II in Lafayette: 5 killed

Date & Time: Dec 28, 2019 at 0921 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N42CV
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Lafayette - Atlanta
MSN:
31T-8020067
YOM:
1980
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
1531
Captain / Total hours on type:
730.00
Aircraft flight hours:
5954
Circumstances:
The personal flight departed from Lafayette Regional Airport/Paul Fournet Field (LFT), Lafayette, Louisiana, and entered the clouds when the airplane was at an altitude of about 200 ft above ground level. Before takeoff, the controller issued an instrument flight rules clearance to the pilot, instructing him to turn right onto a heading of 240° and climb to and maintain an altitude of 2,000 ft mean sea level (msl) after takeoff. Automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) data for the accident flight started at 0920:05, and aircraft performance calculations showed that the airplane was climbing through an altitude of 150 ft msl at that time. The calculations also showed that the airplane then turned slightly to the right toward the assigned heading of 240° and climbed at a rate that varied between 1,000 and 2,400 ft per minute and an airspeed that increased from about 151 to 165 knots. At 0920:13, the airplane started rolling back toward wings level and, 7 seconds later, rolled through wings level and toward the left. At that time, the airplane was tracking 232° at an altitude of 474 ft and an airspeed of 165 knots. The airplane’s airspeed remained at 165 knots for about 10 seconds before it started increasing again, and the airplane continued to roll steadily to the left at an average roll rate of about 2° per second. The aircraft performance calculations further showed that, at 0920:40, the airplane reached a peak altitude of 925 ft msl. At that time, the airplane was tracking 200°, its bank angle was about 35° to the left, and its airspeed was about 169 knots. The airplane then started to descend while the left roll continued. At 0920:55, the airplane reached a peak airspeed of about 197 knots, which then started decreasing. At 0920:57, the airplane descended through 320 ft at a rate of descent of about 2,500 ft per minute and reached a bank angle of 75° to the left. At 0920:58, the controller issued a low altitude alert, stating that the pilot should “check [the airplane’s] altitude immediately” because the airplane appeared to be at an altitude of 300 ft msl. The pilot did not respond, and no mayday or emergency transmission was received from the airplane. The last ADS-B data point was recorded at 0920:59; aircraft performance calculations showed that, at that time, the airplane was descending through an altitude of 230 ft msl at a flightpath angle of about -7°, an airspeed of 176 knots, and a rate of descent of about 2,300 ft per minute. (The flightpath angle is in the vertical plane—that is, relative to the ground. The ground track, as discussed previously, is in the horizontal plane—that is, relative to north.) The airplane struck trees and power lines before striking the ground, traveled across a parking lot, and struck a car. The car rolled several times and came to rest inverted at the edge of the parking lot, and a postcrash fire ensued. The airplane continued to travel, shedding parts before coming to rest at the far end of an adjacent field. At the accident site, the surviving passenger told a local police officer that “the plane went straight up and then straight down.”
Probable cause:
The pilot’s loss of airplane control due to spatial disorientation during the initial climb in instrument meteorological conditions.
Final Report:

Crash of a Pilatus PC-12/47E in Chamberlain: 9 killed

Date & Time: Nov 30, 2019 at 1233 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N56KJ
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Chamberlain – Idaho Falls
MSN:
1431
YOM:
2013
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
11
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
9
Captain / Total flying hours:
2314
Captain / Total hours on type:
1274.00
Aircraft flight hours:
1725
Circumstances:
The pilot and passengers flew in the day before the accident and the airplane remained parked outside on the airport ramp overnight. Light to moderate snow and freezing drizzle persisted during the 12 to 24-hour period preceding the accident. In addition, low instrument meteorological conditions existed at the time of the accident takeoff. Before the flight, the pilot removed snow and ice from the airplane wings. However, the horizontal stabilizer was not accessible to the pilot and was not cleared of accumulated snow. In addition, the airplane was loaded over the maximum certificated gross weight and beyond the aft center-of-gravity limit. A total of 12 occupants were on board the airplane, though only 10 seats were available. None of the occupants qualified as lap children under regulations. The takeoff rotation was initiated about 88 kts which was about 4 kts slower than specified with the airplane configured for icing conditions. After takeoff, the airplane entered a left turn. Airspeed varied between 89 and 97 kts during the initial climb; however, it decayed to about 80 kts as the airplane altitude and bank angle peaked. The airplane ultimately reached a left bank angle of 64° at the peak altitude of about 380 ft above ground level. The airplane then entered a descent that continued until impact. The stall warning and stick shaker activated about 1 second after liftoff. The stick pusher became active about 15 seconds after liftoff. All three continued intermittently for the duration of the flight. A witness located about 1/2-mile northwest of the airport reported hearing the airplane takeoff. It was cloudy and snowing at the time. He was not able to see the airplane but noted that it entered a left turn based on the sound. He heard the airplane for about 4 or 5 seconds and the engine seemed to be “running good” until the sound stopped. The airplane impacted a dormant corn field about 3/4-mile west of the airport. A postaccident airframe examination did not reveal any anomalies consistent with a preimpact failure or malfunction. On board recorder data indicated that the engine was operating normally at the time of the accident. An airplane performance analysis indicated that the accumulated snow and ice on the empennage did not significantly degrade the airplane performance after takeoff. However, the effect of the snow and ice on the airplane center-of-gravity and the pitch (elevator) control forces could not be determined. Simulations indicated that the pitch oscillations recorded on the flight could be duplicated with control inputs, and that the flight control authority available to the pilot would have been sufficient to maintain control until the airplane entered an aerodynamic stall about 22 seconds after lifting off (the maximum bank angle of 64° occurred after the critical angle-of-attack was exceeded). In addition, similar but less extreme pitch oscillations recorded on the previous flight (during which the airplane was not contaminated with snow but was loaded to a similar center-of-gravity position) suggest that the pitch oscillations on both flights were the result of the improper loading and not the effects of accumulated snow and ice. Flight recorder data revealed that the accident pilot tended to rotate more rapidly and to a higher pitch angle during takeoff than a second pilot who flew the airplane regularly. Piloted simulations suggested that the accident pilot’s rotation technique, which involved a relatively abrupt and heavy pull on the control column, when combined with the extreme aft CG, heavy weight, and early rotation on the accident takeoff, contributed to the airplane’s high angle-of attack immediately after rotation, the triggering of the stick shaker and stick pusher, and the pilot’s pitch control difficulties after liftoff. The resulting pitch oscillations eventually resulted in a deep penetration into the aerodynamic stall region and subsequent loss of control. Although conditions were conducive to the development of spatial disorientation, the circumstances of this accident are more consistent with the pilot’s efforts to respond to the activation of the airplane stall protection system upon takeoff. These efforts were hindered by the heightened airplane pitch sensitivity resulting from the aft-CG condition. As a result, spatial disorientation is not considered to be a factor in this accident.
Probable cause:
The pilot’s loss of control shortly after takeoff, which resulted in an inadvertent, low-altitude aerodynamic stall. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s improper loading of the airplane, which resulted in reduced static longitudinal stability and his decision to depart into low instrument meteorological conditions.
Final Report:

Crash of an Embraer EMB-121A1 Xingu II in Campinas

Date & Time: Apr 2, 2019 at 2315 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
PT-FEG
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Sorocaba - Palmas
MSN:
121-057
YOM:
1982
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The twin engine airplane departed Sorocaba-Estadual Bertram Luiz Leupolz Airport at 2300LT on a flight to Palmas, Tocantins, carrying three passengers and a crew of two. Few minutes after takeoff, the crew encountered technical difficulties and was cleared to divert to Campinas-Viracopos Airport. On final, he realized he could not make it so he attempted an emergency landing in a prairie located about 6 km short of runway 15 threshold. The wreckage was found less than a km from the Jardim Bassoli condominium and all five occupants, slightly injured, were evacuated. The aircraft was damaged beyond repair.