Country

Crash of a Britten-Norman BN-2A-21 Islander on Moa Island

Date & Time: Oct 3, 2022 at 1340 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-WQA
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Saibai Island - Horn Island
MSN:
494
YOM:
1975
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The airplane was completing a routine school charter flight from Saibai Island to Horn Island. En route, the pilot encountered engine troubles and was forced to shut down one engine. He reduced his altitude and attempted an emergency landing on Moa Island when the airplane impacted trees and crashed in a wooded area. The tail section separated upon impact and the aircraft was damaged beyond repair. Fortunately, all seven occupants evacuated safely.

Crash of a Britten-Norman BN-2A-9 Islander in Culebra

Date & Time: Feb 15, 2022
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N821RR
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
San Juan - Culebra
MSN:
338
YOM:
1973
Country:
Crew on board:
0
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Upon landing on runway 13 at Culebra Airport, the twin engine airplane went out of control, veered off runway and came to rest near a taxiway with the right wing severely bent at root. There were no injuries among the occupants.

Crash of a Britten Norman BN-2A-6 Islander in Beaver Island: 4 killed

Date & Time: Nov 13, 2021 at 1349 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N866JA
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Charlevoix – Beaver Island
MSN:
185
YOM:
1970
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
On November 13, 2021, at 1349 eastern standard time, a Britten Norman BN-2A airplane, N866JA, was Substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident on Beaver Island, Michigan. The pilot and three passengers were fatally injured, and one passenger received serious injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135 air taxi flight. The airplane departed the Charlevoix Municipal Airport (CVX), at 1332, with the pilot and 4 passengers on-board. After departing CVX, the airplane turned north and proceeded directly toward the Welke Airport (6Y8), on Beaver Island, Michigan. The enroute portion of the flight was conducted about 1500 ft. above mean sea level (msl), and the airplane remained at this altitude until the it was about 3 nautical miles (nm) from 6Y. At this point, the airplane began descending and was maneuvered toward a straight-in approach to runway 35 at 6Y8. The Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) data ended about 0.24 nm south of the accident site. The airplane impacted the ground about 110 ft east of the extended centerline of runway 35, and 320 ft south of the runway threshold. The turf runway was 3.500 ft long and had a displaced threshold just beyond its intersection with paved runway 9/27. Impact signatures indicated that the airplane struck the ground in a left wing low, nose low attitude. The front of the fuselage was crushed upward and aft. All major components of the airplane were located at the accident scene. Flight control continuity was established from the cockpit controls to each respective control surface except for cuts made by first responders for occupant extraction. Engine control continuity was established from the cockpit to each engine except for cuts made by first responders for occupant extraction. The wing flaps were found in an extended position.

Crash of a Britten Norman BN-2B-26 Islander in Montserrat

Date & Time: Sep 29, 2021 at 1733 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
J8-VBI
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Saint John’s – Montserrat
MSN:
2026
YOM:
1981
Flight number:
SVD207
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
After landing on runway 28 at John A. Osborne Airport, Montserrat, the twin engine aircraft deviated to the left, veered off runway and came to rest against an embankment. All seven occupants were rescued, among them two were injured. The aircraft was severely damaged.

Crash of a Britten Norman BN-2B-27 Islander in Puerto Montt: 6 killed

Date & Time: Apr 16, 2019 at 1050 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
CC-CYR
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Puerto Montt - Ayacara
MSN:
2169
YOM:
1983
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Circumstances:
36 seconds after takeoff from Puerto Montt-Marcel Marchant (La Paloma) Airport Runway 01, while in initial climb, the pilot contacted ATC and declared an emergency. He lost control of the airplane that crashed onto two houses located in a residential area, about 450 metres from the runway end. The houses and the aircraft were destroyed by a post crash fire and all six occupants were killed. Two people in the house were injured.

Crash of a Britten-Norman BN-2A-20 Islander in West Portal: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 8, 2018 at 0828 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-OBL
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Cambridge – Bathurst Harbour
MSN:
2035
YOM:
1986
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
540
Captain / Total hours on type:
80.00
Aircraft flight hours:
12428
Circumstances:
On 8 December 2018, the pilot of a Pilatus Britten-Norman BN2A-20 Islander, registered VH-OBL and operated by Airlines of Tasmania, was conducting a positioning flight under the visual flight rules from Cambridge Airport to the Bathurst Harbour aeroplane landing area (ALA), Tasmania. The aircraft departed Cambridge at about 0748 Eastern Daylight-saving Time and was scheduled to arrive at Bathurst Harbour about 0830 to pick up five passengers for the return flight. The passengers were part of a conservation project that flew to south-west Tasmania regularly, and it was the pilot’s only flight for that day. Automatic dependent surveillance broadcast (ADS-B) position and altitude data (refer to the section titled Recorded information) showed the aircraft tracked to the south-west towards Bathurst Harbour (Figure 1). At about 0816, the aircraft approached a gap in the Arthur Range known as ‘the portals’. The portals are a saddle (lowest area) between the Eastern and Western Arthur Range, and was an optional route that Airlines of Tasmania used between Cambridge and Bathurst Harbour when the cloud base prevented flight over the mountain range. After passing through the portals, the aircraft proceeded to conduct a number of turns below the height of the surrounding highest terrain. The final data point recorded was at about At about 0829, the Australian Maritime Safety Authority received advice that an emergency locator transmitter allocated to VH-OBL had activated. They subsequently advised the Tasmanian Police and the aircraft operator of the activation, and initiated search and rescue efforts. The rescue efforts included two helicopters and a Challenger 604 search and rescue jet aircraft. The Challenger arrived over the emergency locator transmitter signal location at around 0925, however, due to cloud cover the crew were unable to visually identify the precise location of VH-OBL. A police rescue helicopter arrived at the search area at about 1030. The pilot of that helicopter reported observing cloud covering the eastern side of the Western Arthur Range, and described a wall of cloud with its base sitting on the bottom of the west portal. Multiple attempts were made throughout the day to locate the accident site, however, due to low-level cloud, and fluctuating weather conditions, the search and rescue operation was unable to confirm visual location of the aircraft until about 1900. The aircraft wreckage was found in mountainous terrain of the Western Arthur Range in the Southwest National Park (Figure 2) . The search and rescue crew assessed that the accident was unlikely to have been survivable. The helicopter crew considered winching personnel to the site, however, due to a number of risks, including potential for cloud reforming, the time of day and lighting, and other hazards associated with the mountainous location, the helicopter departed the area. The aircraft wreckage was accessed the following day, when it was confirmed that the pilot was fatally injured.
Probable cause:
From the evidence available, the following findings are made with respect to the controlled flight into terrain involving Pilatus Britten-Norman BN2A, VH-OBL, 101 km west-south-west of Hobart, Tasmania, on 8 December 2018.
Contributing factors:
• The pilot continued descending over the Arthur Range saddle to a lower altitude than previous flights, likely due to marginal weather. This limited the options for exiting the valley surrounded
by high terrain.
• While using a route through the Arthur Range due to low cloud conditions, the pilot likely encountered reduced visual cues in close proximity to the ground, as per the forecast conditions. This led to controlled flight into terrain while attempting to exit the range.
Final Report:

Crash of a Britten-Norman BN-2A Islander in Saidor Gap: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 23, 2017 at 1010 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
P2-ISM
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Derim - Lae
MSN:
227
YOM:
1970
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
1982
Captain / Total hours on type:
139.00
Aircraft flight hours:
32232
Circumstances:
On 23 December 2017, at 00:10 UTC (10:10 local), a Britten Norman BN-2A Islander aircraft, registered P2-ISM (ISM), owned and operated by North Coast Aviation, impacted a ridge, at about 9,500 ft (6°11'29"S, 146°46'11"E) that runs down towards the Sapmanga Valley from the Sarawaget Ranges, Morobe Province. The pilot elected to track across the Sarawaget ranges (See figure 1), from Derim Airstrip to Nadzab Airport, Morobe Province, not above 10,000 ft. The track flown from Derim was to the northwest 6.5 nm (12 km) to a point 0.8 nm (1.5 km) westsouthwest of Yalumet Airstrip where the aircraft turned southwest to track to the Saidor Gap. GPS recorded track data immediately prior to the last GPS fix showed that the aircraft was on a shallow descent towards the ridge. The aircraft impacted the ridge about 150 m beyond the last fix. There were no reports of a transmission of an ELT distress signal. During the search for the aircraft, what appeared to be the right aileron was found hanging from a tree near the top of the heavily-timbered, densely-vegetated ridge. The remainder of the wreckage was found about 130 m from the aileron along the projected track. The aircraft impacted the ground in a steep nose-down, right wing-low attitude. The majority of the aircraft wreckage was contained at the ground impact point. The aircraft was destroyed by impact forces. The pilot, the sole occupant, who initially survived, was reported deceased by the rescue team on 27 December 2017 at 22:10. The pilot had made contact with one of the operator’s pilots at 16:15 on 23 December. The pilot’s time of death, recorded on the Death Certificate, was 10:40 am local on 24 December. Rescuers felled trees on the steep heavily timbered, densely vegetated slope about 20 metres from the wreckage and constructed a helipad.
Probable cause:
Cloud build up along the pilot’s chosen route may have forced him to manoeuvre closer than normal to the ridge, in order to avoid flying into the cloud. The aircraft’s right wing struck a tree protruding from the forest canopy during controlled flight into terrain. It is likely that the right aileron mass balance became snagged on the tree and rapidly dislodged the aileron from the wing. The loss of roll control, and the aerodynamic differential, forced the aircraft to descend steeply through the forest and impacted terrain.
Final Report: