Country
code

Tasmania

Crash of a Britten-Norman BN-2A-20 Islander in West Portal: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 8, 2018 at 0828 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-OBL
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Hobart – Bathurst Harbour
MSN:
2035
YOM:
1986
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The pilot departed Hobart Airport at 0748LT on a positioning flight to Bathurst Harbour, southwest Tasmania. En route, he encountered poor weather conditions and limited visibility when the airplane struck the slope of a mountain located in the Southwest National Park, some 32 km northeast of the intended destination. The wreckage was found few hours later in West Portal, about 100 meters below the summit. The pilot, sole on board, was killed.

Crash of a Gippsland GA8 Airvan in Lady Barron

Date & Time: Oct 15, 2010 at 1715 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-DQP
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Lady Barron - Bridport
MSN:
GA8-05-075
YOM:
2005
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2590
Captain / Total hours on type:
1355.00
Circumstances:
The pilot was conducting a charter flight from Lady Barron, Flinders Island to Bridport, Tasmania with six passengers on board. The aircraft departed Lady Barron Aerodrome at about 1700 Australian Eastern Daylight-saving Time and entered instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) several minutes afterwards while climbing to the intended cruising altitude of about 1,500 ft. The pilot did not hold a command instrument rating and the aircraft was not equipped for flight in IMC. He attempted to turn the aircraft to return to Lady Barron Aerodrome but became lost, steering instead towards high ground in the Strzelecki National Park in the south-east of Flinders Island. At about 1715, the aircraft exited cloud in the Strzelecki National Park, very close to the ground. The pilot turned to the left, entering a small valley in which he could neither turn the aircraft nor out climb the terrain. He elected to slow the aircraft to its stalling speed for a forced landing and, moments later, it impacted the tree tops and then the ground. The first passenger to exit the aircraft used the aircraft fire extinguisher to put out a small fire that had begun beneath the engine. The
other passengers and the pilot then exited the aircraft safely. One passenger was slightly injured during the impact; the pilot and other passengers were uninjured. During the night, all of the occupants of the aircraft were rescued by helicopter and taken to the hospital in Whitemark, Flinders Island.
Probable cause:
Contributing safety factors:
• The weather was marginal for flight under the visual flight rules, with broken cloud forecast down to 500 ft above mean sea level in the area.
• The pilot, who did not hold a command instrument rating, entered instrument meteorological conditions because he was adhering to an un-written operator rule not to fly below 1,000 ft above ground level.
• The pilot became lost in cloud and flew the aircraft towards the Mt Strzelecki Range, exiting the cloud in very close proximity to the terrain.
• The aircraft exited the cloud in a small valley, within which the pilot could neither turn round nor out-climb the terrain.
Other key findings:
• The aircraft exited cloud before impacting terrain and with sufficient time for the pilot to execute a forced landing.
• The design of the aircraft’s seats, and the provision to passengers in the GA-8 Airvan of three-point automotive-type restraint harnesses with inertia reel shoulder straps contributed to the passengers’ survival, almost without injury.
Final Report:

Crash of a Rockwell Shrike Commander 500S in Hobart: 1 killed

Date & Time: Feb 19, 2004 at 1643 LT
Operator:
Registration:
VH-LST
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Hobart-Devonport
MSN:
500-3111
YOM:
1971
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
371
Captain / Total hours on type:
40.00
Circumstances:
Few minutes after takeoff, while flying 30 miles northwest from Hobart, the twin engine aircraft crashed in unknown circumstances. The pilot, on a ferry flight to Devonport, was killed.

Crash of a Piper PA-31 Navajo Chieftain in King Island-Currie: 1 killed

Date & Time: Feb 8, 1996 at 0507 LT
Operator:
Registration:
VH-KIJ
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Melbourne-King Island
MSN:
31-7405222
YOM:
1974
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
5519
Captain / Total hours on type:
106.00

Crash of a Piper PA-31 Navajo Chieftain in Launceston: 6 killed

Date & Time: Sep 17, 1993 at 1943 LT
Operator:
Registration:
VH-WGI
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Melbourne-Launceston
MSN:
31-7305075
YOM:
1973
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
9
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Captain / Total flying hours:
701
Captain / Total hours on type:
3.00
Aircraft flight hours:
8712

Crash of a De Havilland DH.114 Heron in Launceston

Date & Time: Aug 4, 1983 at 1200 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-CLY
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Hobart-Launceston
MSN:
14122
YOM:
1957
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0

Crash of a Rockwell Shrike Commander 500S off Hobart

Date & Time: Apr 27, 1981 at 1814 LT
Operator:
Registration:
VH-EXQ
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Melbourne – Hobart
MSN:
500-1831
YOM:
1968
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
1925
Captain / Total hours on type:
77.00
Circumstances:
Due to industrial action, normal domestic airline services had been suspended. The pilot hired the aircraft to convey persons stranded by the strike between Hobart and Melbourne. He submitted a flight plan for the proposed return flight to Melbourne that nominated operations under the Instrument Flight Rules, although he did not hold an appropriate Instrument Rating. The flight to Melbourne was completed without known incident. After refuelling the aircraft and engaging five passengers, the return flight was commenced. A fare was paid by each passenger although the pilot did not hold either a Charter Licence or an appropriate pilot licence. There was considerable cloud in the vicinity of Hobart Airport which, at 1800 hours, was recorded as one okta stratus, base 800 feet; five oktas stratocumulus, base 3000 feet; five oktas altocumulus, base 11,000 feet. The surface wind was a light westerly, and the runway in use was Runway 30. There were rain showers in the area and the runway was wet. The end of daylight was at approximately 1748 hours. When the pilot of VH-EXQ contacted Hobart Tower at approximately 1800 hours, he reported on descent to 7000 feet and 50km from the airport. As the aircraft proceeded, the Aerodrome Controller cleared it for further descent in stages, to provide vertical separation from a preceding aircraft. The only Instrument Landing System (ILS) approach at Hobart Airport was aligned with Runway 12 and the tailwind for a landing in that direction was only two or three knots. In order to expedite their arrivals, the Aerodrome Controller offered the pilot s of both approaching aircraft the option of a straight-in ILS approach to Runway 12 instead of a circling approach to the into-wind Runway 30. Both pilots accepted. At 1803 hours, the preceding aircraft was cleared for an ILS approach. The pilot of VH-EXQ was then advised to expect the same clearance but, to ensure continued separation from the other aircraft, was instructed to make one circuit of the holding pattern at Tea Tree Locator, a navigational radio aid west of the airport. The pilot misunderstood this instruction and, on reaching Tea Tree at about 1805 hours, he continued towards the airport. At 1807 hours, the Aerodrome Controller cleared VH-EXQ for an ILS approach. The pilot acknowledged this instruction in the normal manner and did not advise that he had already commenced the approach. In descending towards the airport the pilot had maintained a high airspeed of nearly 200 knots. From overhead Tea Tree he could see the lights of the preceding aircraft and endeavoured to reduce his speed so as to maintain separation. As a result, the aircraft was still very high as it approached the runway. This was noted by the Aerodrome Controller and, at 1810 hours, he asked the pilot whether he would be able to land on Runway 12 or would prefer to make an approach for Runway 30. The pilot chose the latter and was cleared to a right base leg for Runway 30. The approach to Runway 12 was abandoned and the aircraft turned left onto a close right downwind leg for Runway 30. The landing gear, which had been extended, and the flaps, which had been set at 1/4 down, were not moved from these positions. The pilot reported that at some stage of the approach to Runway 30 he moved the throttles forward to increase power and maintain height. In response the aircraft yawed slightly to the right. Both propeller levers were then pushed fully forward, both throttles were fully opened and the mixture controls were checked in the full-rich position. The aircraft again swung to the right. Identifying this as evidence that the right engine had failed, and after checking from the tachometer that the right propeller was windmilling at about 1500 RPM, the pilot feathered the right propeller and selected the landing gear and flaps up. He believed that he carried out the feathering action at a height of about 300 feet and an airspeed of about 100 knots. At this time the aircraft was heading southwest, towards Single Hill (elevation 680 feet) on the shore of Frederick Henry Bay. The pilot reported that the aircraft would not maintain height or airspeed and he therefore turned left to avoid the hill. The wings were then held level until the aircraft touched down in the bay. After the aircraft turned right at a close base leg position, but then straightened on a southwesterly heading instead of continuing the turn onto final approach, the Aerodrome Controller asked the pilot to confirm that he was tracking for Runway 30. This transmission was not answered and the Aerodrome Controller again called the aircraft. The pilot then reported that he was having trouble with the right engine and he was going to feather. This transmission was made as the aircraft was approaching Single Hill, just before it turned left and descended from view. There were no further transmissions from the aircraft despite a number of calls by the Aerodrome Controller. The Distress Phase of Search and Rescue (SAR) procedures was declared at 1815 hours. The appropriate emergency services were alerted including a helicopter that was on standby for SAR operations. All six occupants were rescued while the aircraft sank and was lost.
Probable cause:
The probable cause of the accident was that, following an apparent loss of power by the right engine, the pilot did not operate the aircraft in the configuration and at the airspeed necessary for safe single-engine flight. The pilot's responses may have been Influenced by operating under Instrument Flight Rules conditions, for which he was not qualified. The cause of the reported loss of power by the right engine was not determined. The following defects were discovered:
- General mechanical wear in left engine,
- Left engine fuel injector system outside manufacturer's specifications,
- Slight timing fault in one magneto on right engine.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 402B in Queenstown

Date & Time: May 30, 1979
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-KIB
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Melbourne – Smithton – Queenstown
MSN:
402B-0518
YOM:
1973
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On approach to Queenstown, the twin engine airplane went into clouds. The pilot initiated a go-around when the airplane struck dead trees and crashed on Mt Sorrell. All three occupants were slightly injured and evacuated while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-6 Twin Otter 200 in Yarra Creek

Date & Time: Feb 13, 1979
Operator:
Registration:
VH-PAQ
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
King Island - Wynyard
MSN:
227
YOM:
1969
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The airplane departed King Island-Currie Airport on a cargo flight to Wynyard-Burnie Airport, carrying one pilot and a load of meat. Weather conditions worsened and the pilot was unable to locate the destination airport so he decided to divert to Devonport Airfield. Unfortunately, the visibility was too low and he eventually decided to return to King Island. While approaching the coast, both engines failed due to fuel exhaustion. The pilot attempted an emergency landing when the airplane crashed in a prairie located in Yarra Creek, on the east coast of the island. The pilot was injured and the aircraft was destroyed.
Probable cause:
Double engine failure in flight due to fuel exhaustion.

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver in Hamilton: 2 killed

Date & Time: Apr 19, 1974 at 1600 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-BSY
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Hamilton - Hamilton
MSN:
1563
YOM:
1964
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
2804
Captain / Total hours on type:
1500.00
Circumstances:
The crew was involved in a local spraying mission in the region of Hamilton, Tasmania. While cruising at an altitude of 500 feet, the pilot-in-command initiated a left turn and descended till 50 feet when the airplane struck power cables. On impact, the left wing was torn off and the aircraft crashed in flames. Both occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
It was determined that a power line was installed few days prior to the accident and apparently, the pilot was not aware of it. The crew has been briefed before flight but the chief pilots failed to inform the crew of the presence of the power line as he was convinced the crew was already aware of its presence.
Final Report: