code

MI

Crash of a Beechcraft E90 King Air in Boyne City: 2 killed

Date & Time: Nov 15, 2021 at 1245 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N290KA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Pontiac - Boyne City
MSN:
LW-59
YOM:
1973
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
While approaching Boyne City Municipal Airport Runway 27, the twin engine airplane crashed in a wooded area located few km short of runway. The aircraft was destroyed and both occupants were killed.

Crash of a Britten Norman BN-2A-6 Islander in Beaver Island: 4 killed

Date & Time: Nov 13, 2021 at 1340 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N866JA
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Charlevoix – Beaver Island
MSN:
185
YOM:
1970
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft departed Charlevoix Airport on a short flight to Beaver Island, carrying four passengers, one pilot and two dogs. On approach to Beaver Island, the airplane crashed in unknown circumstances. A young girl was seriously injured and airlifted to hospital while four other occupants were killed.

Crash of a Cirrus Vision SF50 in Lansing

Date & Time: Aug 24, 2021 at 1858 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N1GG
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
0202
YOM:
2020
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
During the takeoff roll on runway 10R at Lansing-Capital Region Airport, the pilot encountered controllability problems. He rejected the takeoff procedure when control was lost. The aircraft veered off runway to the right and came to rest in a grassy area, bursting into flames. All four occupants escaped uninjured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Socata TBM-700 in Lansing: 3 killed

Date & Time: Oct 3, 2019 at 0857 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N700AQ
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Indianapolis - Lansing
MSN:
252
YOM:
2003
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
On a final ILS approach to Lansing-Capital Region Airport, the crew was cleared to land on runway 10R when the single engine airplane lost height and crashed in a field located few dozen yards short of runway threshold. Three occupants were killed while three others were critically injured.

Crash of a Beechcraft 200 Super King Air in Oscoda: 1 killed

Date & Time: Sep 25, 2018 at 0613 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N241CK
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Detroit - Oscoda
MSN:
BB-272
YOM:
1977
Flight number:
K985
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
3806
Captain / Total hours on type:
201.00
Aircraft flight hours:
13933
Circumstances:
The aircraft collided with trees and terrain while on an instrument approach to Oscoda-Wurtsmith Airport (OSC), Oscoda, Michigan. The airline transport pilot was fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed by impact forces and a post-impact fire. The airplane was registered to Kalitta Equipment LLC, and was operated by Kalitta Charters as a Title14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 positioning flight. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site at the time of the accident, and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was filed for the flight which originated from Willow Run Airport (YIP), Ypsilanti, Michigan, about 0513. According to Kalitta personnel, the pilot was flying to OSC to pick up passengers and subsequently fly them to Memphis, Tennessee. The airplane departed YIP about 0513 and climbed to a cruise altitude of about 13,500 ft. The airplane en route airspeed was about 250 knots. At 0537, when the airplane was about 85 miles south of OSC, it began its initial descent. At 0548, the airplane was vectored to the right to intercept the final approach course and was cleared for the VOR runway 6 approach at OSC. The last radar return was at 0550 and indicated that the airplane was at an altitude of 2,200 ft and 8.1 miles from the runway threshold. It impacted terrain 4.6 miles past this point, about 3.5 miles from the runway threshold. According to the VOR runway 6 approach procedure, an altitude of 2,500 ft (or higher) is flown during the procedure turn. If the OSC altimeter setting is used, descent is made to 1,660 feet to Dogsy intersection, and then to 1,100 feet, the minimum descent altitude (MDA) to Au Sable (ASP) intersection. When the airplane failed to arrive at the airport as scheduled, Kalitta officials notified the Federal Aviation Administration. The wreckage was subsequently located about 1030.

Crash of a Cessna 340A in Kimball: 1 killed

Date & Time: Sep 6, 2018 at 2346 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-GLKX
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Saint Thomas - Saint Clair County
MSN:
340A-1221
YOM:
1981
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
While approaching Saint Clair County Airport by night, the pilot encountered engine problems. The airplane lost height and crashed in an open field located in Kimball, north of the airfield. The aircraft was destroyed and the pilot, sole on board, was killed.

Crash of a McDonnell Douglas MD-83 in Detroit

Date & Time: Mar 8, 2017 at 1452 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N786TW
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Detroit - Washington DC
MSN:
53123/1987
YOM:
1992
Flight number:
7Z9363
Crew on board:
6
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
110
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
15518
Captain / Total hours on type:
8495.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
9660
Copilot / Total hours on type:
2462
Aircraft flight hours:
41008
Aircraft flight cycles:
39472
Circumstances:
A McDonnell Douglas MD-83, registration N786TW, suffered a runway excursion following an aborted takeoff from runway 23L at Detroit-Willow Run Airport, Michigan, USA. The aircraft had been chartered by the University of Michigan Basketball team for a flight to a game in Washington, DC. The flight crew prepared for take-off and calculated V-speeds (V1, VR, V2) using "Normal Thrust Takeoff", a 10 kts headwind, and a take-off weight of 146,600 lbs. The V-speeds for this configuration were 139 kts, 142 kts, and 150 kts, respectively. However, the flight crew chose to increase VR to 150 kts to allow for more control during take-off in the presence of windshear. During takeoff roll, at 14:51:56 (about 3,000 ft down the runway) and about 138 kts of airspeed, the control column was pulled back slightly from a non-dimensional value of -7 to -5.52. The airplane’s left elevator followed the control input and moved from a position of -15° trailing edge down to -13° trailing edge down. The right elevator did not change and stayed at approximately -16° trailing edge down. At 14:52:01 a large control column input was made (151 kts and 4100 ft down the runway) to a non-dimensional 18.5 and the left elevator moves to a position near 15° trailing edge up. After 14:52:05 the right elevator moves to -13° trailing edge down, but no more. The airplane does not respond in pitch and does not rotate. The captain decided to abort the takeoff. The maximum ground speed was 163 kts (173 kts airspeed) and the airplane began to decelerate as soon as the brakes were applied at 14:52:08. Spoilers were deployed at 14:52:10 and thrust reversers were deployed between 14:52:13 and 14:52:15. The aircraft could not be stopped on the runway. The airplane’s ground speed was 100 kts when it left the paved surface. The aircraft overran the end of the runway, damaged approach lights, went through the perimeter fence and crossed Tyler Road. It came to rest on grassy terrain, 345 meters past the end of the runway, with the rear fuselage across a ditch. The nose landing gear had collapsed. Runway 23L is a 7543 ft long runway.
Probable cause:
The NTSB determines that the probable cause of this accident was the jammed condition of the airplane’s right elevator, which resulted from exposure to localized, dynamic wind while the airplane was parked and rendered the airplane unable to rotate during takeoff. Contributing to the accident were (1) the effect of a large structure on the gusting surface wind at the airplane’s parked location, which led to turbulent gust loads on the right elevator sufficient to jam it, even though the horizontal surface wind speed was below the certification design limit and maintenance inspection criteria for the airplane, and (2) the lack of a means to enable the flight crew to detect a jammed elevator during preflight checks for the Boeing MD-83 airplane. Contributing to the survivability of the accident was the captain’s timely and appropriate decision to reject the takeoff, the check airman’s disciplined adherence to standard operating procedures after the captain called for the rejected takeoff, and the dimensionally compliant runway safety area where the overrun occurred.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 525C CitationJet CJ4 in Howell

Date & Time: Jan 16, 2017 at 1159 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N525PZ
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Batavia – Howell
MSN:
525C-0196
YOM:
2015
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
5800
Captain / Total hours on type:
320.00
Aircraft flight hours:
320
Circumstances:
After exiting the clouds during the landing approach at the uncontrolled airport, the private pilot of the small jet canceled his instrument flight plan with air traffic control. He stated that, although there was no precipitation when he exited the clouds, he suspected the runway may be icy due to the weather conditions. The pilot saw an airplane holding short on the taxiway at the end of the runway and assumed it was preparing to takeoff, which he stated led him to believe that the runway condition was good. Although the pilot announced his location and intentions on the airport's common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF), he did not inquire about the runway condition via CTAF/UNICOM. Witnesses reported that the approach looked normal. After touchdown, the pilot applied brakes and realized he had no braking action. He subsequently retracted the speed brakes, spoilers, and flaps, and added takeoff power. The airplane yawed to the left and the pilot reduced engine power to idle while applying rudder to correct the airplane's track. The airplane continued off the runway, where it traveled through a fence and across a road before coming to rest inverted. The pilot and mechanic seated in the airplane that was holding short of the runway during the landing reported that they were only taxiing to a maintenance facility and did not intend to take off. They reported that the taxiways were icy. A witness who assisted the pilot following the accident reported that the roads at the time were covered in ice and "very slick." Recorded data from the airplane showed that the pilot flew a stabilized approach and that the airplane touched down near the approach end of the runway; however, given the icy runway conditions, the airplane's landing distance required exceeded the available runway by more than 8,000 ft. Airport personnel had not issued a NOTAM regarding the icy runway conditions. The airport manager stated he was not at the airport at the time of the accident, and that he was still trying to learn the new digital NOTAM manager system. The employee who was at the airport was authorized to issue NOTAMs, but had not yet been trained on the new system.
Probable cause:
The pilot's attempted landing on the ice-covered runway, which resulted in a runway excursion and impact with terrain. Contributing to the accident was airport personnel's lack of training regarding issuance of NOTAMs
Final Report:

Crash of a Comp Air CA-8 in Ray

Date & Time: Oct 15, 2015 at 1810 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N224MS
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Anniston - Ray
MSN:
0652843
YOM:
2006
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
948
Captain / Total hours on type:
49.00
Circumstances:
The private pilot reported that, while on a left downwind in the airport traffic pattern after conducting a cross-country business flight, he extended the flaps 10 degrees. While on short final, he fully extended the flaps, and shortly after, the left wing dropped. The pilot attempted to correct the left wing drop by applying right aileron and rudder; however, the airplane did not respond. The pilot chose to conduct a go-around and increased engine power. The airplane subsequently pitched up, and the left turn steepened. The pilot subsequently reduced engine power, and the airplane began to descend. The airplane struck the ground short of the runway, and the left wing separated from the fuselage. The examination of the airframe, flight controls, and engine revealed no preimpact mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. Examination of the trim system revealed that the right aileron trim and the left rudder trim were in positions that would have resulted in a right turn and a left yaw. Further, a witness reported that the airplane appeared to be in a cross-controlled attitude while on final approach to the airport. It is likely that the pilot’s improper use of the trim led to a cross-controlled situation and resulted in the subsequent stall during the attempted go-around.
Probable cause:
The pilot's improper use of the trim, which created a cross-controlled situation and resulted in an aerodynamic stall during the attempted go-around.
Final Report: