Crash of a Piper PA-61P Aerostar (Ted Smith 601) in Antwerp: 4 killed

Date & Time: Jun 2, 1990 at 1911 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N4PC
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Antwerp - Antwerp
MSN:
61-0743-8063365
YOM:
1980
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
Delta Air Transport of Belgium arranged a Piper 601P Aerostar, N4PC, to shoot a promotion film. It was to fly in formation with an DAT Embraer 120 Brasilia near Antwerp Airport (ANW). The Brasilia, OO-DTH, departed Liège-Bierset Airport (LGG) at 17:57 and headed for Antwerp. Piper Aerostar N4PC took off from Antwerp at 18:43 and headed for Kallo, were both aircraft would join formation. It was agreed that the Aerostar would be on the left hand side of the EMB-120 because the camera crew was sitting on the right hand side of the Aerostar. After circling the city of Antwerp, the crew of OO-DTH contacted the Antwerp air traffic controller, stating his intentions to carry out a low pass over runway 29, followed by a high speed pass. The Aerostar would be alongside OO-DTH on both occasions. After that they would break and continued to Brussels. Antwerp Tower issued clearance at 19:06. At 19:08 OO-DTH radioed their plans to N4PC: "I am starting approach and descent. I am going over the runway. I will not make a touch and go, I will just pull up, left and then back high speed." The pilot of N4PC replied: "OK... I will go straight ahead". At 19:11 both aircraft made a low pass over runway 29 at a speed of 140 kts. OO-DTh was climbing away in a left turn when a mid-air collision occurred with N4PC. The tail of the Piper was sheared off and the aircraft crashed out of control near a railway line. All four occupants were killed. The Brasilia was able to make a safe emergency landing at Antwerpen.
Probable cause:
The collision was the consequence of the following factors:
- Misunderstanding between both crew due to a poor flight preparation, especially regarding the end of the mission and the evacuation of the area,
- The captain of the Embraer indicated he would pull up for climb then initiate a left turn while the pilot of the Piper indicated he would continue straight ahead, which caused the Piper to cut the trajectory of the Embraer that was flying on the right side of the Piper,
- The pilot of the Piper was seating in the left front seat in his cockpit so his position did not allow him to have a good overview of the situation and the exact position of the Embraer.

Crash of a Boeing B-17G-VE Flying Fortress at RAF Binbrook

Date & Time: Jul 25, 1989 at 1330 LT
Operator:
Registration:
F-BEEA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Binbrook - Binbrook
MSN:
8552
YOM:
1944
Region:
Crew on board:
10
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
11179
Captain / Total hours on type:
2131.00
Circumstances:
During the takeoff roll, after about 100 yards, a slight swing to the left developed, which the commander (who was the handling pilot) corrected by partially retarding the power on engines n°3 and 4, and by the use of rudder. Full power was then re-applied on all engines, but the aircraft started to swing to the right. The pilot throttled back engine n°1 and 2, together with the application of rudder, but these actions were not immediately effective. The aircraft did not resume a straight course until it was on the grass to the right of the runway. Knowing that the B17 had been operated from grass runways, the commander elected to continue with the take-off. However, after some 400-500 yards the aircraft swung further to the right, by which time the speed was 90-95 mph. The commander then became aware that the aircraft's path was obstructed by a tree and a pile of gravel. The left wing tip struck the tree and the n°4 propeller struck the gravel. The aircraft yawed to the right, crossed a hollow in the ground and landed in a cornfield beyond. The fuselage broke in two and a fire erupted. All 10 occupants were rescued, among them five were injured, two seriously. The aircraft was totally destroyed by fire.
Probable cause:
The commander was subsequently unable to provide any explanation for the accident, although he suggested that the n°1 engine turbo-compressor may have been 'cutting in and out'. He also considered that the right wheel brake may not have been completely free. One eye witness, an engineer who was familiar with B17 aircraft, saw smoke emanating from the area of the n°3 engine at the start of the take-off. This led him to venture the opinion that this engine may have over-boosted and then suffered a power loss, thus causing the sequential left and right swings.
Final Report:

Crash of a Dassault M.D.311 Flamant near Montceau-les-Mines: 6 killed

Date & Time: Feb 13, 1988 at 1135 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
F-AZEP
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Montceau-les-Mines - Montceau-les-Mines
MSN:
286
YOM:
1952
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Captain / Total hours on type:
2000.00
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft was carrying three crew members who were taking part to a cinematography mission at Montceau-les-Mines Airport. Following several low passes completed successfully, the aircraft was approaching runway 27 for a new low pass. At a height of about one meter with flaps and landing gear up, the aircraft struck a hedge where took place three photographers and cameramen. Following the first impact, the aircraft overturned and crashed in an open field, coming to rest upside down. All three occupants as well as all three people on the ground were killed.

Crash of a Douglas C-54Q Skymaster near Indio: 2 killed

Date & Time: Dec 1, 1980 at 1343 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N96449
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Hemet - Tucson
MSN:
10750
YOM:
1945
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
Airtankers "T1" (N96449, msn 10750) and "T2" (N406WA, msn 35955) both Douglas DC-4's, departed the Hemet-Ryan Field, CA (HMT) about 13:22. Both airtankers had been recently released by the Forest Service from southern California fire assignments and were headed for their home base in Tucson, Arizona. While enroute, the crew of T1 engaged in taking in-flight photographs of T2 at an altitude of approximately 9,500 feet. T1 was flying in formation with T2 at his four to five o'clock position. The pilot of T1 stated over the radio that they were going to cross over to the other side of T2 to take more photographs. T2 gave permission and said that he would hold steady. The repositioning path T1 flew was a 45 degree overtaking angle from the four to five o'clock position toward the 10 to 11 o'clock position of T2. The vertical separation between the two airtankers was insufficient and a mid-air collision occurred. The vertical fin of T1 struck the right wing flap of T2. T1's fin and rudder were sheared off by that impact. The retardant tanks of T2 compressed the top aft end of the fuselage of T1. The number two propeller of T2 severed the fuselage of T1 approximately 10 feet in front of its horizontal stabilizer. T1's tail section was separated from the rest of the airtanker at that time, rendering it out of control. The pilot of T2 radioed Palm Springs Approach Control at 13:50, declared an emergency, and apprised them of the collision. T2 landed safely at the Palm Springs Airport at 13:56. After T1 experienced the tail separation, they lost altitude rapidly. T1 dropped debris for about a mile and a half until it cut through two power lines and then struck the earth nose first. There was a post-mishap fire. The captain and copilot were fatally injured. The tail section of T1 was found approximately two and a half miles from the main wreckage site. T2's damage consisted of damage to the right wing flap, scrapes and punctures to the retardant tank, damage to the right wheel compartment, badly "chewed up" propeller blades on the number two engine, a hole in the left wing, a dented left horizontal stabilizer on the tail, and various other damage.
Source: ASN

Crash of a Grumman G-44 Widgeon in Auckland: 4 killed

Date & Time: Dec 24, 1970 at 0744 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
ZK-BAY
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Mechanics Bay - Mechanics Bay
MSN:
1362
YOM:
1944
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
Pilot Roger Poole was taking a TV news crew of three to film a burning 8.5m launch near Browns Island. After circling the launch and landing nearby, the floatplane took off and circled to the right at low level. It straighten out as if to return to base at Mechanics Bay, but then banked steeply to the right, the turn becoming near vertical. The nose dropped and it crashed into the sea, killing all four aboard.
Probable cause:
The investigation found the float near the wingtip could obscure filming, but for a better camera angle the aircraft could be flown with the right rudder to skid around the nose, with opposite aileron to counteract any rolling effect. The pilots view to the right was obstructed by the camera operator, he was flying into the early morning sun, and the artificial horizon was switched off and locked, all of which prevented him realising the dangerous angle until too late.

Crash of a Lockheed 5C Vega in Saint George: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 13, 1938
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
NC48M
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Saint George - Saint George
MSN:
100
YOM:
1930
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The single engine aircraft christened 'Honeymoon Express' was owned by Paul Mantz (pilot) and used for cinematography. With two photographer on board, he was completing some maneuver for the movie 'Only Angels Have Wings' with Cary Grant. While landing, the aircraft hit the ground violently, went out of control and came to rest upside down. A photographer was killed while both other occupants were injured. The aircraft was destroyed.

Crash of a Lockheed 9A Orion in Victoria Falls: 1 killed

Date & Time: Nov 17, 1932
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
NC12229
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Livingstone - Livingstone
MSN:
187
YOM:
1931
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
Crew was performing aerial photography and movie. Accident occurred in unknown circumstances. While the passenger was killed, both other occupants were injured.

Crash of an Avro 504K in Brixton

Date & Time: Feb 2, 1931
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
G-EBYE
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Brooklands – Croydon
YOM:
1928
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The pilot Richard Lush and the passenger Stanley Rodwell, a photographer, were involved in aerial filming of a feature film called 'The Flying Fool'. In unknown circumstances, the single engine aircraft went out of control and crashed in the garden of a house in Brixton. While both occupants were injured, the aircraft was written off.