code

UT

Crash of a Piper PA-46-350P Malibu Mirage in Hurricane

Date & Time: Oct 21, 2018 at 1500 LT
Registration:
N413LL
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Hurricane - Salt Lake City
MSN:
46-36413
YOM:
2007
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The aircraft experienced an in-flight fire shortly after takeoff from General Dick Stout Field Airport, Hurricane, Utah. The airline transport pilot and one passenger sustained serious injuries, the remaining three passengers were not injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage during a subsequent forced landing and fire. The airplane was registered to Keystone Aviation LLC., and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. The cross-country flight had a planned destination of Salt Lake City International Airport, Salt Lake City, Utah. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed. The pilot reported that the preflight inspection, engine runup, and takeoff from Runway 1 were uneventful. He retracted the landing gear once a positive rate of climb had been established, and initiated a left turn to 340°. After reaching an altitude of about 1,200 ft above ground level (agl) he started to smell smoke. The smell rapidly intensified, and the hydraulic pump annunciator then illuminated. He thought the smoke may have been coming from the hydraulic pump, which he assumed was still inadvertently operating. He selected the gear down lever in an effort to turn off the pump, and a few seconds later the two green main landing gear extension lights illuminated, but he did not receive an indication that the nose gear had extended. As he began to turn the airplane back to the airport, the engine lost all power. He calculated that he would not be able to glide the airplane back to the runway, so began to look for an alternate landing site. Smoke was now interfering with his ability to clearly see out of the windows, and all he could see was houses, hills, and gullies. After reaching an altitude of about 400 ft agl, he could see a small field to the right. He maneuvered the airplane for landing in the field, and shortly after touching down, the airplane struck a metal fence and irrigation pipe. The right wing detached, and the airplane came to rest after skidding about 125 ft. All occupants egressed through the upper section of the rear left cabin door, and once the pilot was out, he noticed a fire erupt from the engine cowling. The local fire department arrived a short time later, and were able to extinguish the fire before it reached the cabin.

Crash of a Cessna 525 CitationJet CJ1 in Payson: 1 killed

Date & Time: Aug 13, 2018 at 0230 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N526CP
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
MSN:
525-0099
YOM:
1995
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
Owned by a construction company and registered under Vancon Holdings LLC (VanCon Inc.), the aircraft was parked at Spanish Fork-Springville Airport when it was stolen at night by a private pilot. After takeoff, hew flew southbound to Payson, reduced his altitude and voluntarily crashed the plane onto his house located in Payson. The airplane disintegrated on impact and was destroyed by impact forces and a post crash fire. The pilot was killed. His wife and daughter who were in the house at the time of the accident were uninjured despite the house was also destroyed by fire. Local Police declared that the pilot intentionally flew the airplane into his own home hours after being booked for domestic assault charges.

Crash of a Quest Kodiak 100 near Moab: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 12, 2016 at 0537 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N772RT
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Moab – Green River – Salt Lake City
MSN:
100-0140
YOM:
2015
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
4635
Captain / Total hours on type:
243.00
Aircraft flight hours:
504
Circumstances:
The commercial pilot was departing on a routine positioning flight in dark night visual meteorological conditions. Footage from a security camera at the airport showed the airplane
take off normally and initiate a right turn, which was the established direction of traffic for the takeoff runway. The airplane continued the right turn, then entered an increasingly rapid descent and subsequently impacted terrain about 1 mile southwest from the airport. The wreckage distribution was consistent with a high-energy impact. Examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of any preimpact mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. Autopsy and toxicology testing of the pilot did not reveal any evidence of impairment or incapacitation. Visual conditions prevailed in the area at the time of the accident; however, the setting Moon was obscured by cloud cover, and the airport was located in an area of remote, sparsely-populated high desert terrain. This would have resulted in few visual references to which the pilot could have oriented the airplane. Although the pilot had experience operating in this environment in night conditions and held an instrument rating, the circumstances of the accident are consistent with the known effects of spatial disorientation. The investigation could not determine the initiating event which led to the pilot's mismatch between the airplane's perceived and actual attitude; however, he likely experienced a sensory illusion as a result of spatial disorientation, which led to a loss of control.
Probable cause:
The pilot's loss of control shortly after takeoff due to spatial disorientation.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 525 CitationJet CJ1 in Cedar Fort: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jan 18, 2016 at 1000 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N711BX
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Salt Lake City - Tucson
MSN:
525-0299
YOM:
1999
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
3334
Captain / Total hours on type:
1588.00
Aircraft flight hours:
2304
Circumstances:
The airline transport pilot and passenger departed on a cross-country flight in instrument meteorological conditions in the light business jet. About 1 minute after departure, air traffic control instructed the pilot to climb and maintain an altitude of 14,000 ft mean sea level (msl). About 3 minutes later, the pilot stated that the airplane's flight management system (FMS) had failed. Shortly thereafter, he requested a climb and stated that he was "trying to get to clear skies." Over the next several minutes, the controller provided the pilot with headings and altitudes to vector the airplane into visual meteorological conditions. During this time, and over the course of several transmissions, the pilot stated that he was "losing instruments," was hand-flying the airplane (likely indicating the autopilot was inoperative), and that he wanted to "get clear of the weather." Radar data indicated that, during the 10-minute flight, the airplane conducted a series of climbs and descents with large variations in airspeed. About 2 minutes before the loss of radar contact, the airplane entered a climbing right turn, reaching its highest altitude of about 21,000 ft, before it began a rapidly descending and tightening turn. Performance data revealed that, during this turn, the airplane entered a partially-inverted attitude, exceeded its design maneuvering speed, and reached a peak descent rate of about 36,000 ft per minute. Radar contact was lost at an altitude of about 16,000 ft msl, and the airplane subsequently experienced an inflight breakup. The wreckage was distributed over a debris path that measured about 3/4-mile long and about 1/3-mile wide. Postaccident examination and testing of various flight instruments did not indicate what may have precipitated the inflight anomalies that the pilot reported prior to the loss of control. Additionally, all airframe structural fractures were consistent with ductile overload, and no evidence of any preexisting condition was noted with the airframe or either engine. The airplane was equipped with three different sources of attitude information, all three of which were powered by separate sources. It is unlikely that all three sources would fail simultaneously. In the event the pilot experienced a dual failure of attitude instrumentation on both the pilot and copilot sides, airplane control could have been maintained by reference to the standby attitude indicator. Further, the pilot would have been afforded heading information from the airplane's standby compass. Although the pilot did not specifically state to the controller the nature of the difficulties he was experiencing nor, could the investigation identify what, if any, anomalies the pilot may have observed of the airplane's flight instruments, the pilot clearly perceived the situation as one requiring an urgent ascent to visual conditions. As a single pilot operating without the assistance of an additional crewmember in a high-workload, high-stress environment, the pilot would have been particularly susceptible to distraction and, ultimately, a loss of airplane control due to spatial disorientation.
Probable cause:
The pilot's loss of control due to spatial disorientation while operating in instrument meteorological conditions, which resulted in an exceedance of the airplane's design stress limitations, and a subsequent in-flight breakup. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's reported inflight instrumentation anomaly, the origin of which could not be determined during the investigation.
Final Report:

Crash of a Canadair CRJ-200ER in Saint George: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jul 17, 2012 at 0100 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N865AS
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
MSN:
7507
YOM:
2001
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
Registered N865AS, aircraft arrived in Saint George, Utah, at 2236LT after completing flight DL7772 from Salt Lake City. All occupants deplaned and the aircraft was parked on the tarmac for the night. After midnight, a commercial pilot climbed over the barbed wire fence, open the door of the aircraft (which was not closed by key) and managed to start the engines. Aircraft run for several meters before it struck a part of the terminal building and came to rest in a car parking lot. The pilot then shot himself in the cockpit. Polices forces confirmed later that he wanted to stole the aircraft after his girlfriend was killed that day in Colorado Springs.
Probable cause:
Aircraft stolen by a commercial pilot who shot himself in the cockpit after trying to take off without any authorization (illegal flight).

Crash of a Lockheed P2V-7 Neptune in Modena: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jun 3, 2012 at 1347 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N14447
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Cedar City - Cedar City
MSN:
826-8010
YOM:
1959
Flight number:
Tanker 11
Location:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
6145
Captain / Total hours on type:
1850.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
4288
Copilot / Total hours on type:
38
Aircraft flight hours:
12313
Circumstances:
The airplane collided with mountainous terrain while conducting firefighting operations, 20 miles north of Modena, Utah. The airplane was operated by Neptune Aviation Services under contract with the US Forest Service as an exclusive public-use fixed-wing airtanker service contract conducted under the operational control of the Bureau of Land management (BLM). Both pilots were fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and post crash fire. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a company flight plan had been filed. The flight originated in Cedar City, Utah, at 1315. The crew of Tanker 11 consisted of the pilot, copilot, and crew chief. They were based out of Missoula, MT, and had been together as a crew for the previous 3 weeks. Normally, the crews stay together for the entire fire season. Tanker 11 crew had operated out of Reno for the 2 weeks prior to the accident. During fire drop operations the tanker is manned by the pilot and copilot, while the crew chief remains at the fire base as ground personnel. The day before the accident while en route from Reno to Cedar City they performed one retardant drop on the White Rock fire, then landed at Cedar City. The crew departed the Cedar City tanker base and arrived at their hotel in Cedar City around 2230. The following morning, the day of the accident, the crew met at 0815, and rode into the Cedar City tanker base together. Tanker 11 took off at 1214 on its first drop on the White Rock fire, and returned at 1254. The crew shut down the airplane, reloaded the airplane with retardant, and did not take on any fuel. Tanker 11 departed the tanker base at 1307 to conduct its second retardant drop of the day, which was to be in the same location as the first drop. Upon arriving in the Fire Traffic Area (FTA) Tanker 11 followed the lead airplane, a Beech Kingair 90, into the drop zone. The drop zone was located in a shallow valley that was 0.4 miles wide and 350 feet deep. The lead airplane flew a shallow right-hand turn on to final, then dropped to an altitude of 150 feet above the valley floor over the intended drop area. While making the right turn on to final behind the lead plane, Tanker 11's right wing tip collided with terrain that was about 700 feet left of the lead airplane's flight path, which resulted in a rapid right yaw, followed by impact with terrain; a fire ball subsequently erupted. Tanker 11 created a 1,088-foot-long debris field and post impact fire.
Probable cause:
The flight crew's misjudgment of terrain clearance while maneuvering for an aerial application run, which resulted in controlled flight into terrain. Contributing to the accident was the flight crew's failure to follow the lead airplane's track and to effectively compensate for the tailwind condition while maneuvering.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna T207A Turbo Stationair 8 in Monument Valley

Date & Time: May 23, 2011 at 1520 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N803AN
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Grand Canyon - Monument Valley
MSN:
207-0570
YOM:
1981
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
965
Captain / Total hours on type:
140.00
Aircraft flight hours:
13417
Circumstances:
According to the airplane's operator, the airplane was part of a flight of four airplanes that were taking an organized tour group of revenue passengers on a sightseeing tour of southern Utah. While operating in a high density altitude environment, the pilot was flying into an airport that had a 1,000-foot cliff about 400 feet from the end of the runway he was landing on. Because of the presence of the cliff, the Airguide Publications Airport Manual stated that all landings should be made on the runway that was headed toward the cliff and that all takeoffs should be made on the runway that was headed away from the cliff. The manual also stated that a go-around during landing was not possible. During his approach, the pilot encountered a variable wind and downdrafts. During the landing flare, the airplane dropped onto the runway hard and bounced back into the air. The pilot then immediately initiated a go-around and began a turn away from the runway heading. While in the turn, he was most likely unable to maintain sufficient airspeed, and the airplane entered a stall/mush condition and descended into the ground. A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.
Probable cause:
The pilot's decision to initiate a go-around after a bounced landing at an airport where go-arounds were not advised and his failure to maintain adequate airspeed during the go-around.
Final Report:

Crash of a Lockheed P-2 Neptune in Tooele: 3 killed

Date & Time: Apr 25, 2009 at 1004 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N442NA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Missoula - Alamogordo
MSN:
726-7286
YOM:
1962
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
7334
Captain / Total hours on type:
916.00
Aircraft flight hours:
3554
Circumstances:
The multi-engine fire bomber, which was not carrying retardant, was established at its cruise altitude while en route to a fire base where it would be used as part of the effort to fight a local fire. While en route, the flight crew encountered a forecast area of instrument meteorological conditions, whereupon they began a series of descents to lower altitudes in order to stay in visual flight rules (VFR) conditions beneath the clouds. During the last few minutes of their flight, the flight crew had descended to an altitude that was less than 1,300 feet above ground level (agl) over nearly level terrain. As they approached rapidly rising terrain at the end of the broad open valley they had been flying over, they inadvertently entered instrument meteorological conditions (IMC). Soon thereafter, while still in a nearly wings-level attitude, the airplane impacted a ridge about 240 feet below its top. The First Officer, who was flying at the time, had asked the Captain about ten minutes prior to the impact if their altitude was high enough to clear the upcoming terrain, but the Captain did not respond, and the First Officer did not challenge the Captain about the issue. Witnesses in the area reported low clouds with ceilings about 200 feet above ground level with a visibility of one-quarter mile or less, with rain and fog. One of the witnesses reported momentarily viewing the airplane flying "very low," while the others reported only being able to hear the airplane.
Probable cause:
The flight crew's failure to maintain terrain clearance during low altitude flight in low ceiling and visibility conditions. Contributing to the accident was the flight crew's failure to adequately monitor their location with respect to the rising terrain environment ahead, and, their lack of crew resource management communication as a crew.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft King Air 100 in Moab: 10 killed

Date & Time: Aug 22, 2008 at 1750 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N601PC
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Moab - Cedar City
MSN:
B-225
YOM:
1975
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
9
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
10
Captain / Total flying hours:
1818
Captain / Total hours on type:
698.00
Aircraft flight hours:
9263
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft, owned by the Red Canyon Aesthetics & Medical Spa, a dermatology clinic headquartered in Cedar City, was returning to its base when shortly after take off, the pilot elected to make an emergency landing due to technical problem. The aircraft hit the ground, skidded for 300 meters and came to rest in flames in the desert, near the Arches National Park. All ten occupants, among them some cancer specialist who had traveled to Moab early that day to provide cancer screening, cancer treatment, and other medical services to citizens in Moab, were killed.
Probable cause:
The pilot’s failure to maintain terrain clearance during takeoff for undetermined reasons.
Final Report:

Crash of a Spectrum FJ33 in Spanish Fork: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jul 25, 2006 at 1606 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N322LA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Spanish Fork - Spanish Fork
MSN:
01
YOM:
2006
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
2300
Captain / Total hours on type:
22.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
3100
Copilot / Total hours on type:
16
Aircraft flight hours:
44
Aircraft flight cycles:
47
Circumstances:
The proto-type experimental light jet airplane was departing on a local maintenance test flight. Witnesses reported that the airplane entered a right roll almost immediately after liftoff. The roll continued to about 90 degrees right wing down at which point the right wingtip impacted the ground. During examination of the wreckage, the aileron control system was found connected such that the airplane rolled in the opposite direction to that commanded in the cockpit. The maintenance performed on the airplane before the accident flight included removal of the main landing gear (MLG) in order to stiffen the MLG struts. Interviews with the mechanics who performed the maintenance revealed that during re-installation and system testing of the MLG, it was discovered that the changes to the MLG struts impacted the Vbracket holding the aileron control system's upper torque tube. The V-bracket was removed and a redesigned V-bracket was installed in its place. This work required the disconnection of a portion of the aileron control system, including the removal of the aft upper torque tube bell crank from the torque tube. The mechanic who reinstalled the aft upper torque tube bell crank was under the incorrect assumption that there was only one way to install the bell crank on the torque tube. However, there are actually two positions in which the bell crank could be installed. The incorrect installation is accomplished by rotating the bell crank 180° about the axis of the torque tube and flipping it front to back, and this is the way the bell crank was found installed. With the bell crank installed incorrectly and the rest of the system installed as designed, there is binding in the system. This binding was noticed on the accident airplane during the inspection after initial installation. However, the mechanic did not recognize that the bell crank was improperly installed on the torque tube. Instead of fixing the problem by removing and correctly reinstalling the bell crank, he fixed the problem by disconnecting the necessary tie rods and rotating the upper torque tube so that the arm of the bell crank pointed up and to the left. This action reversed the movement of the ailerons. According to all of the personnel interviewed, there was no maintenance documentation to instruct mechanics how to perform the work since this was a proof-of-concept airplane. None of the mechanics who performed the work could recall if the position of the ailerons in relation to the position of the control stick was checked. Such a position check, if it had been performed by either the mechanics after the maintenance or by the flight crew during the preflight checks, would assuredly have indicated that the system was installed incorrectly.
Probable cause:
Incorrect installation by company maintenance personnel of the aft upper torque tube bell crank resulting in roll control that was opposite to that commanded in the cockpit. Contributing factors were the lack of maintenance documentation detailing the installation of the bell crank, the installing mechanic's incorrect assumption that the bell crank could only be installed in one position, and the failure of maintenance personnel and the flight crew to check the position of the control stick relative to the ailerons after the maintenance and during the preflight checks.
Final Report: