Country
code

Lincolnshire

Crash of a Cessna 421C Golden Eagle III in Humberside: 1 killed

Date & Time: Mar 29, 2003 at 1229 LT
Registration:
G-SAIR
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Humberside - Humberside
MSN:
421C-0471
YOM:
1978
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
2250
Captain / Total hours on type:
1850.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
20000
Copilot / Total hours on type:
600
Circumstances:
About 50 minutes into the flight, the aircraft returned to Humberside circuit and was cleared by ATC for a touch-and-go landing on Runway 21. The landing was firm but otherwise uneventful and witnesses heard the power being applied as it accelerated for takeoff. Just before rotation two large "puffs of smoke" were seen to come from the vicinity of the mainwheels as both propellers struck the runway. The aircraft then lifted off and almost immediately began to yaw and roll to the left. The left bank reached an estimated maximum of 90° but reduced just before the left wing tip struck the ground. The aircraft then cartwheeled across the grass to the south of the runway and burst into flames. The owner in the left pilot's seat and the pilot in the right pilot's seat escaped from the wreckage, but the flight examiner, who was occupying a seat in the passenger cabin, was unable to vacate the aircraft and subsequently died of injuries sustained in the post impact fire. An engineering investigation found no fault with the aircraft that might have caused the accident. The investigation concluded that the most probable cause was an inadvertent retraction of the landing gear whilst the aircraft was still on the ground.
Probable cause:
An engineering investigation found no fault with the aircraft that might have caused the accident. The investigation concluded that the most probable cause was an inadvertent retraction of the landing gear whilst the aircraft was still on the ground. The confusion over individual roles would have been resolved if the examiner had given a pre-flight briefing in line with the guidance contained in the FAA Designated Examiners' Handbook, but both pilots have stated that this briefing did not take place. In any event, the FAA Handbook and FARs are unclear on who should be the commander of the flight although FAR 61.47 states the examiner is not normally to be the Pilot in Command except by prior agreement with the applicant or other person who would normally be acting as Pilot in Command. Nevertheless, it is clear that the instructor should have been briefed that he was fulfilling the safety pilot role and was responsible for "protect(ing) the overall safety of the flight to whatever extent is necessary". If the instructor had clearly understood this responsibility, he might have monitored the owner's actions more closely during the touch-and-go and might have intervened earlier. Notwithstanding the confusion, the instructor took control when he considered that the owner was not taking appropriate action to control the aircraft, although the actual moment that he took control is in dispute. Given the owner's belief that the instructor was the commander and that the instructor was in any case by far the more experienced pilot, it is not surprising that he relinquished control even though, unknowingly, he had a more complete understanding of the aircraft's predicament. The flight time from the propeller strikes to the next ground impact was only a few seconds. Once the aircraft became airborne with a significant amount of power applied and a badly damaged left propeller, the situation was well beyond any emergency for which either pilot might have trained. The options for action were very limited and would have required a full appreciation of the circumstances, plus extremely rapid analysis and reactions if those actions were to be successful.
Final Report:

Crash of a Boeing B-17G-VE Flying Fortress at RAF Binbrook

Date & Time: Jul 25, 1989 at 1330 LT
Operator:
Registration:
F-BEEA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Binbrook - Binbrook
MSN:
8552
YOM:
1944
Region:
Crew on board:
10
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
11179
Captain / Total hours on type:
2131.00
Circumstances:
During the takeoff roll, after about 100 yards, a slight swing to the left developed, which the commander (who was the handling pilot) corrected by partially retarding the power on engines n°3 and 4, and by the use of rudder. Full power was then re-applied on all engines, but the aircraft started to swing to the right. The pilot throttled back engine n°1 and 2, together with the application of rudder, but these actions were not immediately effective. The aircraft did not resume a straight course until it was on the grass to the right of the runway. Knowing that the B17 had been operated from grass runways, the commander elected to continue with the take-off. However, after some 400-500 yards the aircraft swung further to the right, by which time the speed was 90-95 mph. The commander then became aware that the aircraft's path was obstructed by a tree and a pile of gravel. The left wing tip struck the tree and the n°4 propeller struck the gravel. The aircraft yawed to the right, crossed a hollow in the ground and landed in a cornfield beyond. The fuselage broke in two and a fire erupted. All 10 occupants were rescued, among them five were injured, two seriously. The aircraft was totally destroyed by fire.
Probable cause:
The commander was subsequently unable to provide any explanation for the accident, although he suggested that the n°1 engine turbo-compressor may have been 'cutting in and out'. He also considered that the right wheel brake may not have been completely free. One eye witness, an engineer who was familiar with B17 aircraft, saw smoke emanating from the area of the n°3 engine at the start of the take-off. This led him to venture the opinion that this engine may have over-boosted and then suffered a power loss, thus causing the sequential left and right swings.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft A100 King Air in Sturgate

Date & Time: Jan 12, 1977
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
G-BABX
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Leavesden - Sturgate
MSN:
B-141
YOM:
1973
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On approach to Sturgate Airport, while completing a last turn to join the approach path, the twin engine airplane stalled and crashed in a field. All five occupants were injured and the aircraft was destroyed.
Probable cause:
Possible stall due to insufficient speed during the last turn. Also, accumulation of ice was suspected.

Crash of a Vickers 648 Varsity T.1 in Immingham: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jun 14, 1966
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
WF334
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Lindholme - Lindholme
MSN:
526
YOM:
1951
Region:
Crew on board:
7
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The crew departed RAF Lindholme on a training mission. While in cruising altitude, the airplane collided with a private Cessna 337 registered G-ATJO. The Cessna went out of control and crashed in a field, killing its pilot, sole on board. Following the collision, three cadets on board the Varsity bailed out and the captain attempted an emergency landing in a field. Six crew members were found alive while one of the cadet who bailed was killed as his parachute was not properly fastened. The aircraft was written off.

Crash of a Vickers 648 Varsity T.1 at RAF Manby

Date & Time: Mar 4, 1965 at 1953 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
WL680
Flight Type:
Schedule:
Manby - Manby
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The crew was completing a local training at RAF Manby, Lincolnshire. On final approach with an engine voluntarily inoperative, the crew decided to make a go around when the airplane stalled and crashed in a field located 2,2 km east of Louth, short of the airbase. All three crew members were evacuated safely while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
It was determined that the remaining engine lost power when the crew elected to make a go around with one engine already inoperative. In such conditions, the airplane stalled and crashed.

Crash of an Avro 694 Lincoln B.2 at RAF Manby

Date & Time: Nov 13, 1958
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
SX934
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Manby - Manby
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The crew was engaged in a local training mission at RAF Manby. On touchdown, an undercarriage collapsed and the four engine aircraft slid for several yards before coming to rest. All three crew members were uninjured while the aircraft was written off.
Probable cause:
Undercarriage failure on landing.

Ground accident of an Avro 652 Anson XI at RAF Hemswell

Date & Time: Jun 24, 1958
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
PH545
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Hemswell - Hemswell
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
While taxiing at RAF Hemswell on a local training flight, the aircraft suffered an undercarriage collapse. The airplane came to rest on its belly and was considered as damaged beyond repair. Both pilots were unhurt.
Probable cause:
Failure of an undercarriage during taxi.

Crash of an Avro 694 Lincoln B.11 at RAF Hemswell

Date & Time: Dec 20, 1957
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
RF557
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Hemswell - Hemswell
Region:
Crew on board:
6
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
After touchdown at RAF Hemswell, a sudden gust of wind ballooned the aircraft back into the air. It landed heavily tail down and swung off the runway. All six crew members were unhurt while the aircraft was considered as damaged beyond repair.

Ground accident of an Avro 652A Anson XII at RAF Spitalgate

Date & Time: Feb 25, 1956
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
PH662
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Spitalgate - Spitalgate
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Suffered an undercarriage failure while taxiing at RAF Spitalgate. Both occupants escaped uninjured while the aircraft was considered as damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
Undercarriage failure during taxiing.

Crash of a Vickers 648 Varsity T.1 at RAF Swinderby: 1 killed

Date & Time: Mar 25, 1954
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
WF386
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Swinderby - Swinderby
MSN:
545
YOM:
1951
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The crew was completing a night training sortie at RAF Swinderby. On final approach, due to low visibility, the pilot-in-command failed to locate the runway properly and decided to make a go around. The aircraft was seen to fly over the runway at low height when at the end, it struck trees and crashed in a wooded area. The captain was killed and the copilot was seriously injured.