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Crash of a Canadair CRJ-200ER in Saint George: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jul 17, 2012 at 0100 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N865AS
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
MSN:
7507
YOM:
2001
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
Registered N865AS, aircraft arrived in Saint George, Utah, at 2236LT after completing flight DL7772 from Salt Lake City. All occupants deplaned and the aircraft was parked on the tarmac for the night. After midnight, a commercial pilot climbed over the barbed wire fence, open the door of the aircraft (which was not closed by key) and managed to start the engines. Aircraft run for several meters before it struck a part of the terminal building and came to rest in a car parking lot. The pilot then shot himself in the cockpit. Polices forces confirmed later that he wanted to stole the aircraft after his girlfriend was killed that day in Colorado Springs.
Probable cause:
Aircraft stolen by a commercial pilot who shot himself in the cockpit after trying to take off without any authorization (illegal flight).

Crash of a Swearingen SA26T Merlin IIB in Saint George: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jul 7, 1998 at 1547 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N501FS
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Anchorage - Saint George
MSN:
T26-146
YOM:
1969
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
13000
Captain / Total hours on type:
250.00
Aircraft flight hours:
7799
Circumstances:
The flight departed Anchorage, Alaska, and was en route to Saint George, Alaska, to pick up passengers for a return flight to Anchorage. The pilot-in-command (PIC) was seated in the right seat, and the copilot was seated in the left seat. This was the copilot's third flight in this make and model airplane, and he was not qualified as a crewman in it under 14 CFR Part 135. There was no record of when the copilot last performed a non directional beacon (NDB) approach. The NDB indicator in the cockpit was on the left side of the left control column, partially blocked from the view of the PIC. The minimum altitude for the segment of the approach prior to the final approach fix (FAF) was 1,700 feet. The Minimum Descent Altitude (MDA) for the final segment of the approach was 880 feet. The reported ceiling was 100 feet overcast. The Air Route Traffic Control Center radar altitude readout for the airplane revealed that the airplane descended below 600 feet prior to reaching the FAF. The radar ground track revealed the airplane on course prior to the course reversal procedure turn on the published approach. The radar ground track showed that after the course reversal, the airplane continued through the published final approach course, and turned to parallel the inbound track three miles north of course. The radar plot terminates about the location of the 550 feet high cliffs where the airplane was located. Weather at the time of the accident was reported as 100 foot overcast. This location was 5.5 miles (DME) from the airport. A review of radar tapes from the day prior to the accident, show the same airplane and PIC tracking the published course outbound and inbound, and descending below the published approach minima to below 500 feet. This flight successfully landed at the airport. An interview with the copilot from the successful flight revealed that the PIC intentionally descended to 300 feet on the approach until he acquired visual contact with the ocean, then flew to the airport to land. An aircraft flying on the published inbound final approach course at 5.5 DME is over water, approximately three miles from the nearest terrain.
Probable cause:
The pilot-in-command's failure to adequately monitor the instrument approach and the copilot's failure to intercept and maintain the proper NDB bearing on the approach. Contributing factors were the pilot-in-command's obstructed view of the NDB indicator and his overconfidence in his personal ability, the terrain (cliffs), low ceiling, and the flight crew's disregard of the minimum descent altitude.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna T207A Skywagon near Littlefield: 1 killed

Date & Time: Sep 20, 1996 at 1939 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N6468H
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Grand Canyon - Saint George
MSN:
207-0532
YOM:
1979
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
23000
Captain / Total hours on type:
7.00
Aircraft flight hours:
10009
Circumstances:
The airplane was being positioned to another airport at night. The flight was over mountainous terrain. The airplane collided with the top of a 4,600-foot bluff. The pilot had a history of transient global amnesia. Examination of the accident site revealed a 567-foot long wreckage path, oriented along the direct course line from the departure point to the destination. Damage to the engine and propeller indicated that the engine was developing power at impact.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain clearance with terrain during descent for undetermined reasons. Contributing factors were the dark night and mountainous terrain.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 421B Golden Eagle II near Tooele: 2 killed

Date & Time: Nov 16, 1988 at 0110 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N222BL
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Saint George - Salt Lake City
MSN:
421B-0824
YOM:
1974
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
6375
Aircraft flight hours:
2774
Circumstances:
The flight departed St. George, UT, at 0100 mst enroute to Salt Lake City (SLC). A flight plan was not filed. The weather forecast was for IMC with mountain tops obscured. The pilot requested flight following from SLC center and proceeded on the airways until about 40 miles south of SLC where radar contact was lost. Upon loss of radar contact, the controller asked the pilot what his altitude was. The pilot replied that he was at 10,500 feet. That was the last contact with the flight. After repeated attempts to reestablish contact, it was determined that the aircraft had gone down. A search was begun and the wreckage was found 30 miles southwest of SLC at the 9,500 feet level of a mountain. Both occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: in flight collision with terrain/water
Phase of operation: cruise - normal
Findings
1. (f) light condition - dark night
2. (f) weather condition - snow
3. (f) weather condition - low ceiling
4. (f) terrain condition - mountainous/hilly
5. (c) in-flight planning/decision - improper - pilot in command
6. (c) became lost/disoriented - inadvertent - pilot in command
7. (c) proper altitude - not maintained - pilot in command
8. (c) flight into known adverse weather - attempted - pilot in command
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 401 in South Lake Tahoe: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jan 27, 1986 at 0720 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N988JM
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
South Lake Tahoe - Saint George
MSN:
401-0305
YOM:
1969
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
4400
Aircraft flight hours:
5860
Circumstances:
Aircraft took off in clear weather but below-freezing temperatures with heavy frost on aircraft surfaces. No preflight, run-up or warm-up performed. On initial climb, left engine power loss occurred for undetermined reason, but probably associated with temp/cold engine operation. Pilot turned into dead engine in apparent course reversal, failed to feather propeller and lowered landing gear during turn. Aircraft stalled, rolled inverted and crashed into residential area. Engine teardown revealed no mechanical defects. Post-mortem and toxicological tests revealed no physiological impairment. All three occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: loss of engine power (partial) - nonmechanical
Phase of operation: takeoff - initial climb
Findings
1. (c) aircraft preflight - not performed - pilot in command
2. (f) weather condition - temperature extremes
3. (c) miscellaneous - undetermined
----------
Occurrence #2: loss of control - in flight
Phase of operation: maneuvering - turn to landing area (emergency)
Findings
4. (f) aircraft performance,engine out capability - deteriorated
5. (f) ice/frost removal from aircraft - not performed - pilot in command
6. (f) gear extension - improper - pilot in command
7. (f) propeller feathering - not performed - pilot in command
8. (c) aircraft handling - not maintained - pilot in command
----------
Occurrence #3: in flight collision with terrain/water
Phase of operation: descent - uncontrolled
Final Report:

Crash of a Boeing B-52G-95-BW Stratofortress near St George: 7 killed

Date & Time: Apr 11, 1983
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
58-0161
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
MSN:
464229
YOM:
1958
Flight number:
Lure 75
Crew on board:
7
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
7
Circumstances:
The airplane departed Robins AFB on an exercise (Red Flag mission) bound for California. En route, it deviated from the prescribed flight path several times and was assisted and reoriented by an AWACS crew. While cruising over Utah in poor visibility, the crew failed to realize his altitude was insufficient when the airplane struck the slope of a mountain located 20 miles north of St George. The aircraft disintegrated on impact and all seven crew members were killed.
Crew:
Cpt Donald W. Hiebert, pilot,
1st Lt Thomas C. Lennep Jr., copilot,
Cpt Jonathan M. Bishop, radio navigator,
1st Lt Matthew W. Cervenak, navigator,
1st Lt Bernard S. Russell, EWO,
Col Caroll D. Gunther, pilot observer,
S/Sgt Major Carter, air gunner.
Probable cause:
Navigation error on part of the crew.

Crash of a Lockheed 5C Vega in Saint George: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 13, 1938
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
NC48M
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Saint George - Saint George
MSN:
100
YOM:
1930
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The single engine aircraft christened 'Honeymoon Express' was owned by Paul Mantz (pilot) and used for cinematography. With two photographer on board, he was completing some maneuver for the movie 'Only Angels Have Wings' with Cary Grant. While landing, the aircraft hit the ground violently, went out of control and came to rest upside down. A photographer was killed while both other occupants were injured. The aircraft was destroyed.