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Crash of a Lockheed C-130H Hercules in the Drake Passage: 38 killed

Date & Time: Dec 9, 2019 at 1813 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
990
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Punta Arenas - Teniente Marsh
MSN:
4776
YOM:
1978
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
17
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
21
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
38
Circumstances:
The four engine airplane departed Santiago de Chile at 1021LT and landed at Punta Arenas for a technical stop at 1444LT. It took off at 1653LT on a leg to Teniente Rodolfo Marsh-Presidente Eduardo Frei Montalva Airport located on King George Island, Antarctica, carrying 21 passengers and 17 crew members. After flying a distance of about 390 NM, while in cruising altitude, the radar contact was lost, vertical to the Drake Passage. SAR operations were initiated jointly by the Chilean, Uruguay and Argentine Air Forces which dispatched several aircraft over the area. Two days later, debris were found floating on water. It seems that none of the 38 occupants survived the crash.

Crash of a Cessna 560 Citation Encore into the Atlantic Ocean: 1 killed

Date & Time: May 24, 2019 at 1800 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N832R
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Saint Louis - Fort Lauderdale
MSN:
560-0585
YOM:
2001
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
While approaching the destination, the airplane continue over the Atlantic Ocean and all communications with the pilot were interrupted for about an hour. Two F-15' were dispatched to intercept the aircraft that entered a dive and crashed into the Atlantic Ocean about 500 km east of Fort Lauderdale. The pilot did not survive.

Crash of a Lockheed KC-130J Hercules into the Pacific Ocean: 5 killed

Date & Time: Dec 6, 2018 at 0200 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Iwakuni - Iwakuni
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:
The crew departed Iwakuni Airport on a refuelling training mission over the Pacific Ocean. By night and in unknown circumstances, the four engine airplane collided with a McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet. Both aircraft went out of control and crashed into the ocean some 200 miles off Muroto Cape, Japan. The United States Marine Corps confirms that two Marines have been found. One is in fair condition and the other has been declared deceased by competent medical personnel. All five crew members from the Hercules are still missing after two days of SAR operations and presumed dead.

Crash of a Piper PA-31T Cheyenne into the Atlantic Ocean: 5 killed

Date & Time: Oct 25, 2018 at 1119 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N555PM
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Andrews - Governor's Harbour
MSN:
31T-7620028
YOM:
1976
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
2778
Aircraft flight hours:
7718
Circumstances:
On October 25, 2018, at about 1119 eastern daylight time, and about 100 miles southeast of Charleston, South Carolina (CHS), radar contact was lost with a Piper PA-31T, N555PM. The airplane was presumed to have impacted the Atlantic Ocean. The commercial pilot and four passengers were not found and presumed fatally injured. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight, which departed from a private airport in Andrews, South Carolina about 1047, bound for Governor's Harbor airport, Bahamas (MYEM). The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The pilot's family reported that the airplane departed from its home base, a private runway in Andrews, South Carolina. Preliminary radar and air traffic control data from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) showed the airplane departed the area toward the southeast about, 1047. The airplane crossed over the coastline and began a climb to an assigned altitude of 25,000 feet. The climb rate was consistent at 500 feet per minute (fpm), and the airplane remained on course flying toward the assigned airspace fix, named LURKS. When the airplane was about 12 miles from LURKS (about 95 miles southeast of CHS), while climbing through 24,300 feet, the pilot made a garbled radio transmission indicating that he was diverting to CHS. The airplane began a descent at about 1,000 fpm and maintained a course towards LURKS. About 23 seconds later, after several air traffic control requests to repeat the radio transmission, the pilot replied, "we're descending". About 15 seconds later, at an altitude of about 23,500 feet, the airplane turned sharply toward the left, and the descent rate increased to greater than 4,000 fpm. About 25 seconds later, the radar data altitude parameter went invalid, the last reported altitude was 21,500 feet. About 35 seconds later, the pilot transmitted "emergency emergency, five five five papa mike", and no further transmissions were recorded. About 25 seconds later, the last radar position (32.3184N 78.0661W) was recorded at 1119, which was about 3 miles to the left (northeast) of the airplane's original course towards LURKS. That position corresponded to a location about 100 nautical miles east southeast of CHS. The FAA issued an Alert Notice (ALNOT) and a search effort was conducted by the U.S. Coast Guard. One of the search airplanes reported an oil sheen on the surface of the water near the last known coordinates; however, neither the airplane nor debris were located. The search effort was cancelled on October 27 at sunset. A review of the airplane maintenance logbooks revealed that the most recent annual inspection was performed on September 5, 2018, and at that time the airframe had accrued a total of 7,718 hours. That inspection included routine maintenance, the replacement of the starter generators on both engines, replacement of the cabin oxygen bottle, and compliance with several airworthiness directive inspections, including AD 2017-02-06, which addresses a potential issue with electrical wiring arcing and fire risk. According to FAA airman records the pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single and multi-engine land, rotorcraft-helicopter, and instrument airplane. His most recent medical certificate was issued on March 8, 2018, at which time he reported a total of 2,778 hours of total flight experience. A preliminary review of weather records revealed that there were no convective or precipitation echoes in the area at the time of the accident. Satellite imagery depicted a mid-level layer of clouds in the area with tops estimated at 15,500 feet. An Airmen's Meteorological Information advisory for moderate turbulence was in effect for the region. Atmospheric model results characterized the atmosphere as stable, with a freezing level around 13,000 feet and a shallow layer favorable for light rime icing at 23,000 feet.

Crash of a Cessna 208B Supervan 900 into the Pacific Ocean: 1 killed

Date & Time: Sep 27, 2018 at 1528 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-FAY
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Saipan - Sapporo
MSN:
208B-0884
YOM:
2001
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The pilot, sole on board, was in charge to convoy the airplane from Saipan Island, in the Pacific, to the New Chitose Airport in Sapporo. The single engine airplane departed Saipan Airport at 0700 (Japan Time) on a nine hours flight. A first check was made with Japan ATC at 1023 and the next fixpoint was scheduled at 1144. ATC tried several times to establish a radio contact with the pilot but this was not possible. As the airplane was following its track, the decision was taken to send two F-4 of the Japan-Self Defense Force. At 1450, a visual contact was established with the Cessna but unfortunately, both military crew were unable to establish a radio contact with the pilot. Few minutes later, the single engine airplane went into clouds when control was lost. It crashed at 1528 into the Pacific Ocean some 120 km east of Sendai. Some debris were spotted floating on water at 1723 and no trace of the pilot, a Norwegian citizen. It was later considered that he died in the accident. The airplane, built in 2001, was converted for geophysical missions with a new 900 hp engine and other special equipments.

Crash of a Grumman G-64 into the Atlantic Ocean

Date & Time: Aug 25, 2018
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N1955G
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Elizabeth City - Elizabeth City
MSN:
G-406
YOM:
1954
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The crew departed Elizabeth City CGAS in North Carolina in a mission to deploy weather buoys in the Atlantic Ocean. While taking off, the seaplane struck something floating on water and came to rest some 425 miles east off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. All five crew members evacuated the cabin and were later recovered by the crew of a container vessel. The aircraft sank and was lost.

Crash of a Grumman C-2A(R) Greyhound into the Philippines Sea: 3 killed

Date & Time: Nov 22, 2017 at 1445 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
162175
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Iwakuni - USS Ronald Reagan
MSN:
55
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
9
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
The aircraft was on its way from Iwakuni Airbase to the USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76) cruising in the Philippines Sea on behalf of the 7th Fleet. It is believed that while approaching the supercarrier, the airplane stalled and crashed into the sea, apparently following an engine failure. Eight crew members were rescued while three are still missing two days after the accident.

Crash of a Shaanxi Y-8F-200W into the Andaman Sea: 122 killed

Date & Time: Jun 7, 2017 at 1335 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
5820
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Mergui – Yangon
YOM:
0
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
14
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
108
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
122
Aircraft flight hours:
809
Circumstances:
The aircraft left Mergui (Myeik) Airport at 1306LT bound for Yangon, carrying soldiers and their family members. While cruising at an altitude of 18,000 feet in good weather conditions, radar contact was lost with the airplane that went out of control and crashed in unknown circumstances into the Andaman Sea at 1335LT. SAR operations were conducted and first debris were found at the end of the afternoon about 218 km off the city of Dawei, according of the Myanmar Army Chief of Staff. It is believed that none of the occupants survived the crash. Brand new, the aircraft has been delivered to the Myanmar Air Force in March 2016. The Shaanxi Y-8 is a Chinese version of the Antonov AN-12 built post 2010. The tail of the aircraft was found a week later and both CFR and DFDR were recovered and transmitted to the Army for further investigations.

Crash of an Antonov AN-32 into the Bay of Bengal: 29 killed

Date & Time: Jul 22, 2016
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
K2743
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Tambaram - Port Blair
MSN:
0809
YOM:
1986
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
6
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
23
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
29
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft left Tambaram AFB (southwest of Chennai) at 0830LT for a three hours flight to Port Blair, Andaman Islands. While cruising at the assigned altitude of 23,000 feet about 280 km east of Chennai, the aircraft made a turn to the left and then dove into the sea. No trace of the aircraft was found and all 29 occupants are feared to be dead.

Crash of an Airbus A320-232 into the Mediterranean Sea: 66 killed

Date & Time: May 19, 2016 at 0237 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
SU-GCC
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Paris – Cairo
MSN:
2088
YOM:
25
Flight number:
MS804
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
10
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
56
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
66
Captain / Total flying hours:
6275
Captain / Total hours on type:
2101.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
2675
Aircraft flight hours:
48000
Circumstances:
The aircraft left Paris-Roissy-Charles de Gaulle Airport at 2321LT on May 18 bound for Cairo. The crew maintained radio contacts with the Greek ATC and was transferred to the Egyptian ATC but failed to respond. Two minutes after the airplane left the Greek airspace, the aircraft fell from FL370 to FL220 in few seconds, apparently making a first turn to the left and then a 360 turn to the right before disappearing from the radar screen at 0237LT while at an altitude of 10'000 feet. It is believed the aircraft crashed into the Mediterranean sea about 280 km northwest of Alexandria, halfway between the Greek island of Crete and the Egyptian coast. The crew did not send any mayday message, thereby all assumptions remains open. It appears that some various debris such as luggage were found on May 20 about 290-300 km north of Alexandria. Two days after the accident, it is confirmed that ACARS messages reported smoke on board, apparently in the lavatory and also in a technical compartment located under the cockpit. Above that, several technical issues were reported by the ACARS system. The CVR has been recovered on June 16, 2016, and the DFDR a day later. As both recorder systems are badly damaged, they will need to be repaired before analyzing any datas.