Crash of a Cessna 421B Golden Eagle II in Franklin

Date & Time: Mar 11, 2021 at 1953 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N80056
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
421B-0654
YOM:
1974
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On March 11, 2021, about 1953 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 421B, N80056, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident at the Macon County Airport (1A5), Franklin, North Carolina. The pilot and two passengers were not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. According to the pilot, this was a planned local flight. The pilot stated that it was a normal start, taxi, and run-up before takeoff. He initiated the takeoff roll and called out speeds in 10 knot (kts) increments looking for a rotation speed of 100 kts. He said the airspeed reached 90 kts and the aircraft acceleration “lagged” while only reaching a maximum airspeed of around 92 kts. He noticed that the runway length was decreasing and elected to abort the takeoff with the remaining runway. He pulled both throttles to idle and initiated maximum braking. Examination of the runway by a Federal Aviation Administrator inspector, revealed tire skid marks beginning around 1,200 ft from the runway end and continued off into the grass. The airplane continued down a slope, and through a fence before coming to rest. All of the occupants exited the airplane safely and a post-crash fire ensued. The airplane sustained fire and structural damage to the fuselage.

Crash of a Cessna 421B Golden Eagle II in Farmingdale

Date & Time: Jan 10, 2021 at 1302 LT
Registration:
N421DP
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
421B-0353
YOM:
1973
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On January 10, 2021, about 1302 eastern standard time, a Cessna 412B, N421DP, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Old Bethpage, New York. The pilot was seriously injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. According to an inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the pilot took off on runway 32 from Republic Airport (FRG), Farmingdale, New York about 1254 on a local flight. Shortly after departure, the pilot reported that he had a loss of power on both engines and was returning to FRG to land on runway 14. The airplane impacted a solid waste disposal facility, about 2.3 nm northwest of FRG. The pilot was met by first responders and taken to a local hospital for treatment. There was no postaccident fire. Inspectors with the FAA responded to the accident site about one hour after the accident and examined the wreckage. Substantial damage was evident to the fuselage, both wings, and empennage.

Crash of a Cessna 421B Golden Eagle II in Delaware: 1 killed

Date & Time: Mar 17, 2019 at 1745 LT
Registration:
N424TW
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Dayton - Delaware
MSN:
421B-0816
YOM:
1974
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
3000
Captain / Total hours on type:
48.00
Aircraft flight hours:
8339
Circumstances:
The pilot departed on a short cross-country flight in the twin-engine airplane. Instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) were present at the time. While en route at an altitude of 3,000 ft mean sea level, the pilot reported that the airplane was "picking up icing" and that he needed to "pick up speed." The controller then cleared the pilot to descend, then to climb, in order to exit the icing conditions; shortly thereafter, the controller issued a low altitude alert. The pilot indicated that he was climbing; radar and radio contact with the airplane were lost shortly thereafter. The airplane impacted a field about 7 miles short of the destination airport. Examination of the airplane was limited due to the fragmentation of the wreckage; however, no pre-impact anomalies were noted during the airframe and engine examinations. Extensive damage to the pitot static and deicing systems precluded functional testing of the two systems. A review of data recorded from onboard avionics units indicated that, about the time the pilot reported to the controller that the airplane was accumulating ice, the airplane's indicated airspeed had begun to diverge from its ground speed as calculated by position data. However, several minutes later, the indicated airspeed was zero while the ground speed remained fairly constant. It is likely that this airspeed indication was the result of icing of the airplane's pitot probe. During the final 2 minutes of flight, the airplane was in a left turn and the pilot received several "SINK RATE" and "PULL UP PULL UP" annunciations as the airplane conducted a series of climbs and descents during which its ground speed (and likely, airspeed) reached and/or exceeded the airplane's maneuvering and maximum structural cruising speeds. It is likely that the pilot became distracted by the erroneous airspeed indication due to icing of the pitot probe and subsequently lost control while maneuvering.
Probable cause:
A loss of airspeed indication due to icing of the airplane's pitot probe, and the pilot's loss of control while maneuvering.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 421B Golden Eagle II in Rock Sound: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jun 5, 2018 at 1545 LT
Registration:
N421MM
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Rock Sound – Treasure Coast
MSN:
421B-0804
YOM:
1974
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
On 5th June, 2018 at approximately 3:45pm local, (Eastern Daylight Time) , a Cessna 421B aircraft crashed in dense bushes shortly after departure from Runway 27 at Rocksound Int’l Airport, Rock Sound, Eleuthera, Bahamas. The crash site was located approximately 2,503 feet / .41 nautical mile (nm) north of the threshold of Runway 09 and 8,588 feet / 1.42 nm from threshold of runway 27. The pilot and 2 passengers were killed and the aircraft was destroyed by impact forces and a post-crash fire. The aircraft made initial contact with trees before making contact with the ground and other trees in dense bushes. The aircraft descended right wing first, in an approximately 40 degree nose-down angle. A crater approximately 12 inches deep and 10 feet long by 5 feet wide was created when the aircraft hit the ground, subsequently crossing a dirt road, before coming to rest partially in an upward incline in trees. The nose of the aircraft came to rest on a heading of 355° degrees. The fuselage of the aircraft was located at Latitudes 24° 53’ 50”N and Longitude 076° 11’33”W. A fire ensued after the crash.
Probable cause:
The Air Accident Investigation Department has determined the probable cause of this accident to be the pilot failure to maintain control of the airplane. Circumstances contributing to the failure to maintain control undetermined. Evidence exist to demonstrate the aircraft was not producing full power at the time it loss control, the reasons for the reduced power unknown. It could not be determined why the fuel selector was position to the auxiliary tank and not the main tank as required by manufacturer’s recommendation. Critical evidence were destroyed in the post impact fire.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 421B Golden Eagle II in Noviny pod Ralskem: 2 killed

Date & Time: Sep 26, 2017 at 0736 LT
Operator:
Registration:
OK-TKF
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Příbram – Gdansk
MSN:
421B-0931
YOM:
1975
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
675
Captain / Total hours on type:
47.00
Aircraft flight hours:
6381
Aircraft flight cycles:
6797
Circumstances:
The twin engine airplane departed Příbram Airport Runway 06 at 0705LT on a charter flight to Gdansk, carrying one passenger and one pilot. About 30 minutes into the flight, while cruising at an altitude of 14,100 feet, the pilot was cleared to climb to FL180 when he declared an emergency and reported the failure of both engines. The aircraft entered an uncontrolled descent and crashed in a wooded area located 1,5 km northeast of Noviny pod Ralskem, bursting into flames. The aircraft was destroyed by impact forces and a post crash fire and both occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
The cause of the accident was an inner mechanical defect in the left engine past its stipulated TSO. The defect caused a forced stall of the engine. For this reason, the propeller on this engine could not be feathered. During the shutdown of the right engine, the feathering of the propeller on this engine did not take place. The aircraft entered to the fall and a stall-spin in which it fell to the ground.
Contributing factors:
- The left engine TSO was over the stipulated limit of 12 years. (The last general overhaul was performed on 29 October 2001.),
- Limited experience of the pilot on this type of aircraft.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 421B Golden Eagle II in Cherokee County: 1 killed

Date & Time: Mar 4, 2017 at 0023 LT
Registration:
N421KL
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Tulsa - Cherokee County
MSN:
421B-0015
YOM:
1970
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
4000
Aircraft flight hours:
7522
Circumstances:
The 69-year-old commercial pilot was making a personal cross-country flight in the newly purchased airplane. When the airplane was on final approach to the destination airport in night visual meteorological conditions, airport surveillance video showed it pitch up and roll to the right. The airplane then descended in a nose-down attitude to impact in a ravine on the right side of the runway. During the descent over the ravine the right wing came in contact with a powerline that briefly cut power to the airport. Postaccident examination of the airframe, engines, and their components revealed no evidence of mechanical anomalies or malfunctions that would have precluded normal operation. The pilot's toxicology findings identified five different impairing medications: clonazepam, temazepam, hydrocodone, nortriptyline, and diphenhydramine. Although the results were from cavity blood and may not accurately reflect antemortem levels, the hydrocodone, temazepam, and diphenhydramine levels were high enough to likely have had some psychoactive effects. While the exact effects of these drugs in combination are not known, it is likely that the pilot was impaired to some degree by his use of this combination of medications, which likely contributed to his failure to maintain control of the airplane.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain control of the airplane during a night visual landing approach. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's impairment due to his use of a combination of medications.
Final Report: