Crash of a Cessna 207 Skywagon in Carrefour: 6 killed

Date & Time: Apr 20, 2022 at 1600 LT
Registration:
HH-FAH
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Port-au-Prince – Jacmel
MSN:
207-0352
YOM:
1976
Location:
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Circumstances:
The single engine airplane departed Port-au-Prince-Toussaint Louverture Airport on a private flight to Jacmel, some 45 km southwest of the capital city. On board were four passengers and one pilot. During climbout, the pilot encountered problems and the airplane lost height until it collided with a truck and crashed on a road located in Carrefour, some 12 km southwest of Port-au-Prince Airport. A passenger was seriously injured while four other occupants as well as the truck driver were killed. The aircraft was destroyed. The only survivor died from his injuries few hours later.

Crash of a Cessna T207A Stationair 8 in Nazca: 7 killed

Date & Time: Feb 4, 2022 at 1210 LT
Operator:
Registration:
OB-2179
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Nazca - Nazca
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
7
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from Nazca-María Reiche Neuman Airport, while in initial climb, the pilot lost control of the single engine airplane that crashed on a dirt road, bursting into flames. The aircraft was destroyed by impact forces and a post crash fire and all seven occupants were killed. They were completing a local sightseeing flight.

Crash of a Cessna 207 Skywagon off Marathon

Date & Time: Dec 29, 2021 at 1622 LT
Registration:
N1596U
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Marathon - Naples
MSN:
207-0196
YOM:
1971
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On December 29, 2021, at 1622 eastern standard time, a Cessna 207 airplane, N1596U, sustained minor damage when it was involved in an accident in the Florida Bay near Marathon, Florida. The pilot sustained serious injuries and the two passengers sustained minor injuries. The airplane was operated by ExecAir of Naples as an on-demand passenger flight under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135. According to the operator, the pilot reported that the takeoff from The Florida Keys Marathon International Airport (MTH), Marathon, Florida was normal, and the flight progressed oncourse over water toward the destination of Naples Municipal Airport (APF), Naples, Florida. Once the airplane reached about 3,500 ft mean sea level, a “bang” from the engine was heard, which was immediately followed by a total loss of engine power and oil spraying onto the cowling. The pilot briefed the passengers that they would not be able to make it to land and to prepare for a water landing. Subsequently, the ditching was accomplished in open water, the airplane remained upright, and everyone evacuated the airplane. About 10-15 minutes later, a passing pleasure vessel rescued the occupants and a United States Coast Guard helicopter also arrived shortly thereafter. Review of photographs of the airplane after it was recovered to land revealed that it sustained minor damage to areas of the cowling, fuselage, and wings. Photos of the engine (Continental Motors, IO-520-F) revealed that a large fracture hole was sustained to the crankcase near the No. 2 cylinder, with several internal engine components protruding from the area. The magnetos were also observed to have fractured from their attach points and were resting on top of the engine. The propeller was intact and showed minimal damage.

Crash of a Cessna 207 Stationair 8 in Bethel

Date & Time: Nov 20, 2021 at 1755 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N9794M
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Bethel – Kwethluk
MSN:
207-0730
YOM:
1981
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On November 20, 2021, about 1755 Alaska standard time, a Cessna 207 airplane, N9794M sustained substantial damage when it was involved in an accident at the Bethel Airport, Bethel, Alaska. The pilot and five passengers were not injured. The airplane was operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 scheduled passenger flight. The purpose of the flight was to transport five passengers and cargo to Kwethluk, Alaska, which is located about 12 miles east of Bethel. The flight was operated by Yute Commuter Service as a scheduled commuter flight as flight number 700B (3). The pilot reported that shortly after departing from Bethel, he noticed that the red, ELT (Emergency Locator Transmitter) light on the instrument panel mounted, remote switch, had illuminated. The pilot then asked the Bethel tower operator if they were hearing an ELT signal, and the tower operator responded that no signal was being received. Moments later, the pilot began to smell what he describes as an electrical burn smell, and he elected to return to Bethel. The pilot said that about one minute later, the electrical burn smell intensified, which was followed by visible smoke in the cockpit, and he then declared an inflight emergency to the Bethel tower. The pilot then turned off the airplane’s master electrical switch, and subsequently opened his side window for ventilation and smoke removal. He said he briefly turned the master switch back on to again declare an emergency with Bethel tower, and to inform the tower operator that he was planning to land on Runway 1L. The pilot said that after landing, during the landing roll, he realized that the nosewheel steering system and brake system were both inoperative. After the airplane rolled to a stop on the left side of Runway 1L, he ordered all the passengers to evacuate the airplane. The pilot reported that after all the passengers had safely departed the airplane, heavy smoke filled the cockpit and passenger compartment, and he saw a candle like flame just behind the pilot and co-pilot seats, just beneath the floorboards of the airplane. Moments after all the passengers and pilot had exited the airplane, it was immediately engulfed in flames.

Crash of a Cessna 207 Skywagon in Monterrey

Date & Time: Oct 7, 2019 at 1005 LT
Operator:
Registration:
XB-MHS
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
207-0063
YOM:
1969
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from runway 11 at Monterrey-Del Norte Airport, while in initial climb, the single engine airplane lost height and crashed on a highway located past the runway end. Fortunately, the airplane did not struck any vehicles and eventually crashed in a field, about 15 meters below the motorway. The pilot, sole on board, was seriously injured and the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Cessna 207 Stationair 7 in Cayenne

Date & Time: Jan 25, 2019 at 1435 LT
Operator:
Registration:
F-OSIA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Cayenne – Maripasoula
MSN:
207-0042
YOM:
1969
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3620
Circumstances:
The single engine airplane departed Cayenne-Rochambeau-Félix Eboué Airport on a cargo flight to Maripasoula, carrying a load of foods on behalf of a restaurant. The pilot was sole on board. Shortly after takeoff, while in initial climb, the engine lost power. The pilot reduced his altitude and attempted an emergency landing on a known open area located near the airport. But on short final, the aircraft struck a embankment and came to rest upside down. The pilot was seriously injured and the aircraft was destroyed.
Probable cause:
The flight was undertaken with an airplane whose center of gravity was beyond the rear center of gravity limits and a mass greater than the maximum take-off mass. The load was not secured. As a result, the performance of the aircraft was degraded and piloting made more difficult. The BEA investigation did not reveal any major failure that could explain a loss of power. Engine performance may have been lower than the manufacturer's standards, due in particular to improper adjustment of the mechanical fuel pump, probably resulting from unsuitable maintenance. This defect was most likely already present on previous flights. It is likely that the power required for the initial climb was greater than what the engine could deliver. This brought the aircraft into a situation where the speed gradually decreased. When the pilot turned, the stall warning sounded and the pilot sensed the engine was losing power.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 207 Skywagon in the Susitna River: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jun 13, 2018 at 1205 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N91038
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Anchorage - Tyonek
MSN:
207-0027
YOM:
1969
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
1442
Captain / Total hours on type:
514.00
Aircraft flight hours:
31711
Circumstances:
Two wheel-equipped, high-wing airplanes, a Cessna 207 and a Cessna 175, collided midair while in cruise flight in day visual meteorological conditions. Both airplanes were operating under visual flight rules, and neither airplane was in communication with an air traffic control facility. The Cessna 175 pilot stated that he was making position reports during cruise flight about 1,000ft above mean sea level when he established contact with the pilot of another airplane, which was passing in the opposite direction. As he watched that airplane pass well below him, he noticed the shadow of a second airplane converging with the shadow of his airplane from the opposite direction. He looked forward and saw the spinner of the converging airplane in his windscreen and immediately pulled aft on the control yoke; the airplanes subsequently collided. The Cessna 207 descended uncontrolled into the river. Although damaged, the Cessna 175 continued to fly, and the pilot proceeded to an airport and landed safely. An examination of both airplanes revealed impact signatures consistent with the two airplanes colliding nearly head-on. About 4 years before the accident, following a series of midair collisions in the Matanuska Susitna (MatSu) Valley (the area where the accident occurred), the FAA made significant changes to the common traffic advisory frequencies (CTAF) assigned north and west of Anchorage, Alaska. The FAA established geographic CTAF areas based, in part, on flight patterns, traffic flow, private and public airports, and off-airport landing sites. The CTAF for the area where the accident occurred was at a frequency changeover point with westbound Cook Inlet traffic communicating on 122.70 and eastbound traffic on 122.90 Mhz. The pilot of the Cessna 175, which was traveling on an eastbound heading at the time of the accident, reported that he had a primary active radio frequency of 122.90 Mhz, and a nonactive secondary frequency 135.25 Mhz in his transceiver at the time of the collision. The transceivers from the other airplane were not recovered, and it could not be determined whether the pilot of the Cessna 207 was monitoring the CTAF or making position reports.
Probable cause:
The failure of both pilots to see and avoid the other airplane while in level cruise flight, which resulted in a midair collision.
Final Report: