Country
code

Bimini

Crash of a Piper PA-31-350 Navajo Chieftain off South Bimini: 1 killed

Date & Time: Apr 16, 2021 at 2210 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N827RD
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
South Bimini – Miami-Opa Locka
MSN:
31-7652094
YOM:
1976
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from runway 10 at South Bimini-Intl Airport, while in initial climb, the aircraft stalled and crashed in the sea. The wreckage was found in shallow water. The pilot was seriously injured and the passenger was killed.

Crash of a Piper PA-46R-350T Matrix off Cat Cay

Date & Time: Aug 25, 2013 at 1406 LT
Registration:
N720JF
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Cat Cay - Kendall-Miami
MSN:
46-92004
YOM:
2008
Location:
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
12250
Captain / Total hours on type:
210.00
Aircraft flight hours:
1000
Circumstances:
According to the pilot, he applied full power, set the flaps at 10 degrees, released the brakes, and, after reaching 80 knots, he rotated the airplane. The pilot further reported that the engine subsequently lost total power when the airplane was about 150 ft above ground level. The airplane then impacted water in a nose-down, right-wing-low attitude about 300 ft from the end of the runway. The pilot reported that he thought that the runway was 1,900 ft long; however, it was only 1,300 ft long. Review of the takeoff ground roll distance charts contained in the Pilot’s Operating Handbook (POH) revealed that, with flap settings of 0 and 20 degrees, the ground roll would have been 1,700 and 1,150 ft, respectively. Takeoff ground roll distances were not provided for use of 10 degrees of flaps; however, the POH stated that 10 degrees of flaps could be used. Although the distance was not specified, it is likely that the airplane would have required more than 1,300 ft for takeoff with 10 degrees of flaps. Examination of the engine revealed saltwater corrosion throughout it; however, this was likely due to the airplane’s submersion in water after the accident. No other mechanical malfunctions or abnormalities were noted. Examination of data extracted from the multifunction display (MFD) and primary flight display (PFD) revealed that the engine parameters were performing in the normal operating range until the end of the recordings. The data also indicated that, 7 seconds before the end of the recordings, the airplane pitched up from 0 to about 17 degrees and then rolled 17 degrees left wing down while continuing to pitch up to 20 degrees. The airplane then rolled 77 degrees right wing down and pitched down about 50 degrees. The highest airspeed recorded by the MFD and PFD was about 70 knots, which occurred about 1 second before the end of the recordings. The POH stated that, depending on the landing gear position, flap setting, and bank angle, the stall speed for the airplane would be between 65 and 71 knots. Based on the evidence, it is likely that the engine did not lose power as reported by the pilot. As the airplane approached the end of the runway and the pilot realized that it was not long enough for his planned takeoff, he attempted to lift off at an insufficient airspeed and at too high of a pitch angle, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall at a low altitude. If the pilot had known the actual runway length, he might have used a flap setting of 20 degrees, which would have provided sufficient distance for the takeoff.
Probable cause:
The pilot’s attempt to rotate the airplane before obtaining sufficient airspeed and his improper pitch control during takeoff, which resulted in the airplane exceeding its critical angle-of-attack and subsequently experiencing an aerodynamic stall at a low altitude. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s lack of awareness of the length of the runway, which led to his attempting to take off with the airplane improperly configured.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-31-350 Navajo Chieftain in South Bimini

Date & Time: Sep 19, 2010 at 1440 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N84859
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
South Bimini - Fort Lauderdale
MSN:
31-7305043
YOM:
1973
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On September 19, 2010, at 1440 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA31-350, N84859, registered to Spirit Air Inc, and operated by Pioneer Air Service was on initial climb out when the lower half of the main cabin door came open. The pilot reversed his course and returned to the departure airport, landing on runway 27. The right main landing gear tire blew out on the landing roll. The airplane went off the right side of the runway, struck a tree, caught fire and came to a complete stop. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight plan was filed. The commercial pilot and five passengers were not injured and the airplane received substantial damage. The flight originated from Bimini Airport, South Bimini Island, Bahamas, at 1435, and was operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135.

Crash of a Rockwell Shrike Commander 500S off Alice Town

Date & Time: Jun 9, 2008 at 1401 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N501AP
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Nassau – Fort Lauderdale
MSN:
500-3224
YOM:
1974
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On June 9, 2008, about 1401 eastern daylight time, an Aero Commander 500S, N501AP, registered to and operated by Gramar 500, Inc., experienced a loss of engine power in both engines and was ditched in the Atlantic Ocean about 1/2 mile south of North Bimini, Bahamas. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area and a visual flight rules flight plan was filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight from Nassau International Airport (MYNN), Nassau, Bahamas, to Ft. Lauderdale Executive Airport (FXE), Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. The airplane was destroyed due to salt water immersion, and the airline transport rated pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. The pilot stated that when the flight was past Bimini, the right engine started running rough and losing power. He turned southeast to enter a left base for runway 09 at South Bimini Airport, and the left engine also began to run rough and lost power. The pilot ditched the aircraft, evacuated into a life raft, and was rescued by a pleasure boater. The pilot also stated that 25 gallons of fuel were added while at MYNN, for a total fuel supply of 90 gallons. Both engines were test run 8 days after the accident using a test propeller. Both engines ran to near maximum RPM. One magneto from each engine was replaced prior to the test run.

Crash of a Beechcraft D18S off Bimini

Date & Time: Feb 2, 2000 at 1407 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N122V
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Miami - Nassau
MSN:
A-828
YOM:
1952
Location:
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On February 2, 2000, about 1407 eastern standard time, a Beech D18S, N122V, registered to South Florida Aircraft Leasing, Inc., operated by Florida Air Cargo, Inc., was ditched in the Atlantic Ocean, approximately 47 miles east of Bimini, Bahamas. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and a visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan was filed for the 14 CFR Part 135 non-scheduled, international, cargo flight. The airplane was substantially damaged and the commercial-rated pilot was not injured, one passenger sustained minor injuries. The flight originated about 1305 from the Opa Locka Airport, Opa Locka, Florida. The pilot stated that the flight departed with all five fuel tanks full of fuel and departed with the left fuel selector positioned to the "main tank" position. The flight continued and approximately 10 minutes after takeoff, he switched the left fuel selector to the auxiliary position and remained on that tank for approximately 35 minutes. When the flight was approximately 20 miles east of Bimini, he switched the left fuel selector to the main tank position where it remained for 5 minutes before he added climb power. While about 45 miles east of Bimini, climbing through 2,300 feet with a good rate of climb, the left manifold pressure dropped to 27 inches and the propeller rpm dropped to 1,300. He turned to fly to Bimini, broadcast a mayday call, and reported no unusual vibration; the fuel pressure and oil pressure gauges indicated normal. He repositioned the fuel selector but the left engine would not restart. He then feathered the left propeller and secured the engine but was unable to maintain altitude with full power applied to the right engine. The airplane was ditched in a slight left wing low attitude and the left engine separated from the airframe. Both occupants exited the airplane, remained in the water for 47 minutes, then were spotted by a U.S. Coast Guard Falcon airplane. They were rescued by a pleasure boat and transported to the east coast of Florida.

Crash of a Beechcraft 200 Super King Air off Bimini: 2 killed

Date & Time: Sep 19, 1999 at 1115 LT
Registration:
YV-385CP
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Fort Lauderdale - Caracas
MSN:
BB-740
YOM:
1981
Location:
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Aircraft flight hours:
1841
Circumstances:
A Beechcraft 200 Super King Air, YV-385CP, crashed into the Atlantic Ocean about 9 miles southwest of Bimini, Bahamas, while on personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area at the time, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The aircraft was destroyed, and the commercial-rated flight instructor and a pilot-rated passenger were both fatally injured. The flight originated from Fort Lauderdale International Airport, the same day, about 10:53. At 11:14, the pilot of YV-385CP told FAA ARTCC that he was experiencing an emergency, and he asked for immediate directions to Bimini. There were no further communications. According to radar information, at 11:13:33, the altitude was about 23,600 feet, and at 11:14:58 it had descended to 2,800 feet. Sound spectrum analysis of an FAA re-recording of communications between the pilot and ATC, indicated there were electronic signatures present, attributable to propeller noise, at cruise setting, for that type of aircraft. Records obtained from Venezuela indicated that earlier, YV-385CP had been involved in an accident, and had incurred extensive structural damage. The aircraft had been repaired in Venezuela, and was subsequently flown to the Unites States for additional repairs. Records obtained from the U.S. repair station indicated that the airplane incurred an extensive maintenance history, with needed repairs including damaged wiring, and leaks in the fuel system, as well as structural leaks, which had lead to several pressurization difficulties.
Probable cause:
Due to lack of evidences, the exact cause of the accident could not be determined.

Crash of a Piper PA-31-350 Navajo Chieftain in South Bimini

Date & Time: Jan 2, 1993 at 0945 LT
Registration:
N4107V
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Fort Lauderdale - South Bimini
MSN:
31-8253010
YOM:
1982
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Crashed in unknown circumstances upon landing at South Bimini Airport. The pilot, sole on board, was uninjured.

Crash of a Cessna 402B off Bimini: 6 killed

Date & Time: Mar 31, 1984 at 0845 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N44NC
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Fort Lauderdale - Bimini
MSN:
402B-0852
YOM:
1975
Location:
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Captain / Total flying hours:
4500
Captain / Total hours on type:
1510.00
Aircraft flight hours:
6387
Circumstances:
This aircraft disappeared on a flight from Fort Lauderdale, FL to Bimini, Bahamas. After departure, the aircraft flight plan was activated by radio. This was the last communication with the aircraft. An itap radar readout revealed an aircraft flight that departed at the appropriate time. This target headed for Bimini, and after about 10 minutes, slowed to 90 knots airspeed. About 4 minutes later the target entered a 5,400 fpm rate of descent and disappeared off radar. Two witnesses saw an aircraft crash into the water near Bimini between 0830 and 0900 on 3/31. The missing aircraft departed Fort Lauderdale at 0823 on 3/31/84. Th aircraft and all six occupants were not recovered. The injury index and acft damage are presumed.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: missing aircraft
Phase of operation: unknown
Findings
1. (c) reason for occurrence undetermined
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft 65-B80 Queen Air off Bimini: 3 killed

Date & Time: Nov 5, 1982 at 1654 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N1HQ
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Fort Lauderdale - Eleuthera Island
MSN:
LD-275
YOM:
1966
Location:
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
1395
Circumstances:
The flight departed Fort Lauderdale at 1626 and at 1654 in the vicinity of Bimini was advised to contact Nassau radio. The flight failed to contact Nassau and there were no further communications with the flight. Search efforts produced negative results. IMC prevailed on the proposed route of flight. Radar depictions showed the most severe weather to be between Miami and Bimini. Sigmet 7 issued at 1455 showed an area of embedded thunderstorms extending to a point 100 miles east of Miami with tops to 40,000 feet that was moving ne at 15 knots. The wreckage and all three occupants were not recovered.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: missing aircraft
Phase of operation: unknown
Findings
1. (c) reason for occurrence undetermined
2. (f) weather condition - thunderstorm
Final Report:

Crash of a Douglas DC-6A off Alice Town: 4 killed

Date & Time: Nov 28, 1980
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N844TA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Alice Town - Miami
MSN:
44421
YOM:
1954
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
After takeoff from Alice Town, Bimini, the four engine airplane lost height and crashed into the sea. All four occupants were killed. It is believed that the crew was engaged in a drug smuggling flight.
Probable cause:
The exact cause of the accident could not be determined but an engine failure was suspected.