Crash of a Piper PA-31-310 in Deadmans Cay: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jun 5, 2022 at 0904 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N711JW
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Deadmans Cay - Nassau
MSN:
31-7712084
YOM:
1977
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from Deadmans Cay Airport, while climbing, the pilot encountered an unexpected situation and lost control of the airplane that crashed about 3 km northwest of the airfield. The airplane came to rest in bushes and was destroyed by impact forces. Among the seven people on board, a woman passenger was killed and six other occupants were injured.

Crash of a Cessna 402B off Chub Cay

Date & Time: Jan 5, 2022 at 0845 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N145TT
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Miami - Chub Cay
MSN:
402B-1333
YOM:
1978
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The twin engine airplane departed Miami-Opa Locka on a charter flight to Chub Cay, carrying one passenger and one pilot. While approaching Berry Islands, the pilot reported engine problems and attempted to ditch the airplane few km offshore. Both occupants were injured and rescued while the airplane sank and was lost. It appears it sank by deep sea.

Crash of a IAI 1124A Westwind II in Treasure Cay: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jul 5, 2021 at 1545 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N790JR
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Treasure Cay – Nassau
MSN:
424
YOM:
1984
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
On the 5th July, 2021 at approximately 3:45PM, EDT (1945UTC), an Israeli Aircraft Industries, (IAI) Westwind 1124A aircraft, United States registration N790JR, crashed a short distance from the end of runway 32 at the Treasure Cay International Airport (MYAT), Treasure Cay, Abaco, Bahamas. The aircraft plowed through airport lighting equipment at the end of the runway, hitting and breaking several trees along its path. A trail of aviation fuel and pieces of the aircraft and avionics equipment from the flight deck, were left behind before the aircraft finally hit a small mound (hill), spinning, hitting several additional trees, breaking apart and bursting into flames. The aircraft came to rest at coordinates 26°45’21.50”N, 77°24’7.26”W, approximately 2,000 feet (.33 miles) from the end of runway 32. As this airport did not have a fire truck or crash and rescue personnel stationed on site, assistance with fire services were requested from the town. Two firetrucks from the township responded, however, due to the location of the crash, and no access road available, the trucks were unable to reach the crash site and assist in extinguishing the blaze. The fire continued unimpeded, dampened only by the intermittent downpour of rain, which did not aid in extinguishing the blaze, but rather, only limited the spread of the fire to surrounding bushes. The raging fire totally destroyed the aircraft and much of the control surfaces and components in the direct area of the blaze. On July 6, a team of investigators from the AAIA and CAA-B were dispatched to the scene. Upon arrival of the investigation team, surrounding brush and trees, as well as some parts and components of the aircraft were still burning. Initial assessments pointed to a possible failure of the aircraft to climb and perform as required. Runway 14/32 is 7,001 x 150 feet with an asphalt surface and based on the distance the aircraft traveled from the end of the runway to its final resting place, the signature marking on trees and airport lighting fixtures struck by the aircraft, in addition to the ground scars, along with pieces of the aircraft beyond the runway, up to the final resting place of the aircraft, it appears the aircraft was approximately 2 to 5 feet about the surface and not developing any lift or climb performance, while developing full power over the ground, striking trees and brush along its path. Investigations uncovered the private flight with a crew of two (2), proposed a flight time departure of 2:10PM EDT from the Treasure Cay International Airport (MYAT), with a planned destination of Nassau, Bahamas (MYNN) and an arrival time of 2:33PM EDT, according to flight plan retrieved from Flightaware.com. The flight plan did not specify whether the flight would be operated under Visual Flight Rules (VFR) or Instrument Flight Rules (IFR). According to witness statements taken at Treasure Cay, witnesses recalled two pilots entering the ramp after 3 pm. Witnesses also stated that one of the persons onboard advised customs that they will be departing for Marsh Harbor for fuel in the aircraft (N790JR).
Probable cause:
The AAIA has classified the accident as a controlled flight into terrain (CFIT) and determined the probable cause of the CFIT accident is due to the failure of the aircraft to climb (perform) as required.
Contributing factors which resulted in the failure of the aircraft to perform as required includes:
- Failure of the crew to configure the aircraft for the proper takeoff segment,
- Crew unfamiliarity with the aircraft systems.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-31-350 Navajo Chieftain off South Bimini: 1 killed

Date & Time: Apr 16, 2021 at 2210 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N827RD
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
South Bimini – Miami-Opa Locka
MSN:
31-7652094
YOM:
1976
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from runway 10 at South Bimini-Intl Airport, while in initial climb, the aircraft stalled and crashed in the sea. The wreckage was found in shallow water. The pilot was seriously injured and the passenger was killed.

Crash of a Douglas DC-3C off Nassau

Date & Time: Oct 18, 2019 at 1630 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N437GB
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Miami - Nassau
MSN:
19999
YOM:
1944
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On the 18th October 2019, at approximately 4:30 PM local time, a Douglas DC-3C aircraft, registration N437GB crashed in the ocean; at coordinates 25°05.55N 077°30.29W, approximately 2.87miles from Runway 14 at the Lynden Pindling International Airport (MYNN) Nassau, Bahamas. There were 2 souls on board. The pilot reported that the left engine failed approximately 25-30 nautical miles from MYNN. The pilot further stated that during single engine operation, the aircraft performance was not optimal so the decision was made to land the aircraft in the ocean. The Air Traffic Control tower was notified by the crew of N437GB, that they will be performing a control water landing. The Royal Bahamas Defense Force was notified. Rescue efforts were then put into place. No injuries were received by the occupants of the aircraft. Aircraft could not be located for physical analysis to be carried out. The weather at the time of the accident was visual meteorological conditions and not a factor in this accident. A limited scope investigation was conducted, no safety message or recommendations were issued.
Probable cause:
Failure of the left engine on approach for unknown reasons.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 421B Golden Eagle II in Rock Sound: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jun 5, 2018 at 1545 LT
Registration:
N421MM
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Rock Sound – Treasure Coast
MSN:
421B-0804
YOM:
1974
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
On 5th June, 2018 at approximately 3:45pm local, (Eastern Daylight Time) , a Cessna 421B aircraft crashed in dense bushes shortly after departure from Runway 27 at Rocksound Int’l Airport, Rock Sound, Eleuthera, Bahamas. The crash site was located approximately 2,503 feet / .41 nautical mile (nm) north of the threshold of Runway 09 and 8,588 feet / 1.42 nm from threshold of runway 27. The pilot and 2 passengers were killed and the aircraft was destroyed by impact forces and a post-crash fire. The aircraft made initial contact with trees before making contact with the ground and other trees in dense bushes. The aircraft descended right wing first, in an approximately 40 degree nose-down angle. A crater approximately 12 inches deep and 10 feet long by 5 feet wide was created when the aircraft hit the ground, subsequently crossing a dirt road, before coming to rest partially in an upward incline in trees. The nose of the aircraft came to rest on a heading of 355° degrees. The fuselage of the aircraft was located at Latitudes 24° 53’ 50”N and Longitude 076° 11’33”W. A fire ensued after the crash.
Probable cause:
The Air Accident Investigation Department has determined the probable cause of this accident to be the pilot failure to maintain control of the airplane. Circumstances contributing to the failure to maintain control undetermined. Evidence exist to demonstrate the aircraft was not producing full power at the time it loss control, the reasons for the reduced power unknown. It could not be determined why the fuel selector was position to the auxiliary tank and not the main tank as required by manufacturer’s recommendation. Critical evidence were destroyed in the post impact fire.
Final Report:

Crash of a Mitsubishi MU-2B-40 Solitaire off Eleuthera Island: 4 killed

Date & Time: May 15, 2017 at 1329 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N220N
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Aguadilla – Space Coast
MSN:
450
YOM:
1981
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
1483
Captain / Total hours on type:
100.00
Aircraft flight hours:
4634
Circumstances:
The commercial pilot and three passengers were making a personal cross-country flight over ocean waters in the MU-2B airplane. During cruise flight at flight level (FL) 240, the airplane maintained the same relative heading, airspeed, and altitude for about 2.5 hours before radar contact was lost. While the airplane was in flight, a significant meteorological information notice was issued that warned of frequent thunderstorms with tops to FL440 in the accident area at the accident time. Satellite imagery showed cloud tops in the area were up to FL400. Moderate or greater icing conditions and super cooled large drops (SLD) were likely near or over the accident area at the accident time. Although the wreckage was not located for examination, the loss of the airplane's radar target followed by the identification of debris and a fuel sheen on the water below the last radar target location suggests that the airplane entered an uncontrolled descent after encountering adverse weather and impacted the water. Before beginning training in the airplane about 4 months before the accident, the pilot had 21 hours of multi engine experience accumulated during sporadic flights over 9 years. Per a special federal aviation regulation, a pilot must complete specific ground and flight training and log a minimum of 100 flight hours as pilot-in-command (PIC) in multi engine airplanes before acting as PIC of a MU-2B airplane. Once the pilot began training in the airplane, he appeared to attempt to reach the 100-hour threshold quickly, flying about 50 hours in 1 month. These 50 hours included about 40 hours of long, cross-country flights that the flight instructor who was flying with the pilot described as "familiarization flights" for the pilot and "demonstration flights" for the airplane's owner. The pilot successfully completed the training required for the MU-2B, and at the time of the accident, he had accumulated an estimated 120 hours of multi engine flight experience of which 100 hours were in the MU-2B. Although an MU-2B instructor described the pilot as a good, attentive student, it cannot be determined if his training was ingrained enough for him to effectively apply it in an operational environment without an instructor present. Although available evidence about the pilot's activities suggested he may not have obtained adequate restorative sleep during the night before the accident, there was insufficient evidence to determine the extent to which fatigue played a role in his decision making or the sequence of events.The pilot's last known weather briefing occurred about 8 hours before the airplane departed, and it is not known if the pilot obtained any updated weather information before or during the flight. Sufficient weather information (including a hazardous weather advisory provided by an air traffic control broadcast message about 25 minutes before the accident) was available for the pilot to expect convective activity and the potential for icing along the accident flight's route; however, there is no evidence from the airplane's radar track or the pilot's communications with air traffic controllers that he recognized or attempted to avoid the convective conditions or exit icing conditions.
Probable cause:
The pilot's intentional flight into an area of known icing and convective thunderstorm activity, which resulted in a loss of control of the airplane.
Final Report:

Crash of a Pilatus PC-12/47E in Cat Cay

Date & Time: Mar 8, 2017 at 1246 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N8TS
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Saint Petersburg - Cat Cay
MSN:
1650
YOM:
2016
Location:
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Pilot advised that upon making his approach to land at Cat Cay (MYCC), on short final he experienced an unexpected accelerated sink rate. To compensate for the sink rate he increased the pitch of the aircraft. While going over the threshold, a slight impact was felt as the landing gear came into contact with the seawall. He flew the aircraft until it came to a stop about 600 feet down the runway. No injuries were sustained, aircraft received substantial damage.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-31-350 Navajo Chieftain off Nassau: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 2, 2014 at 0845 LT
Operator:
Registration:
C6-REV
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Governor’s Harbour – Nassau
MSN:
31-7652062
YOM:
1976
Flight number:
302
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
10
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
7650
Aircraft flight hours:
11744
Circumstances:
On Tuesday December 2nd, 2014 at approximately 8:45 am (1345Z) a Ferg’s Air Limited, Piper PA-31-350 Navajo aircraft, registration C6-REV, operated as Southern Air Limited Flight 302, ditched in waters approximately 6nm from shore in the southwestern district of New Providence. The flight originated at Governor’s Harbour, Eleuthera (MYEM) with 10+1 persons on board at approximately 8:15 am in Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC). At around 8:30am, the aircraft 15 nautical miles east of Lynden Pindling International Airport at 4,500 feet contacted Nassau Air Traffic Control Tower. The aircraft was instructed that runway 09 was in use and they can expect a landing on that runway. Upon final approach to runway 09, with the landing gears selected to the “EXTEND” position, only the nose and right main landing gear lights indicated the “down and locked” position. The left main landing gear light did not illuminate to indicate the “down and locked” position, so the landing was aborted and the pilot requested to go around so he could recycle and troubleshoot the landing gear issue. The pilot made a left turn, flew over the north western shoreline and recycled the landing gears a few times and also tried the emergency hand pump in an attempt to extend the gear. Despite all efforts, the left main landing gear light still did not illuminate to indicated the gear was in the safe “down and locked” position. At this time the aircraft was allowed to fly by the tower so that the controller may make a visual check of the landing gears to see if they were in the extended position. The controller advised the pilot that all gears “appeared to be extended”. Once again the pilot proceeded outbound to make another attempt for landing. For this approach the pilot made a right turn over the southwestern shoreline and proceeded downwind to runway 09. While on the downwind to runway 09 the pilot stated he began to experience problems with the right engine. The engine eventually stopped and all attempts to restart were unsuccessful. As a result of single engine operation, level flight could not be maintained even after retracting the gears and cleaning up the airplane. The decision was made by the pilot to ditch in the water vs. attempting to make the airport where numerous trees and obstacles would make the landing more difficult if the runway could not be made. After touching down on the water the most of the occupants were able to evacuate the aircraft through the normal and emergency exits before the aircraft sank into the ocean. One passenger died during the process. Witness stated that “the plane skipped across the water three times before rotating and hitting with a severe impact. The port (left) tail section received the bulk of the impact as did the port side of the plane.” Eye witness further stated that the passenger that died and “luggage from the baggage compartment were ejected from the rear of the plane on the port side.” “Multiple passengers could not swim or were extremely limited in their ability to swim.” Despite the plane having the full complement of survival equipment (life vests), only two were taken out of the aircraft. Passengers were holding on to bags and other debris that floated out of the aircraft as it submerged. Passengers helped each other until rescuers arrived to assist. Estimates from eye witness were that “the entire plane disappeared under water from 30 to 60 seconds after impact.” The depth where the aircraft came to rest on the water was reported as in excess of 6,500 feet. Once the aircraft settled, it submerged and was not able to be recovered. Safety concerns raised by eye witness could not be confirmed as the plane was never recovered.
Probable cause:
The AAIPU determines that the probable causes of this accident as:
- Engine failure and the inability of the aircraft to maintain a safe altitude.
Contributing Factors includes:
- Failure of the left main landing gear.
The following findings were identified:
1. Weather was not a factor in the accident.
2. Air Traffic Services were proper and did not contribute to the cause of the accident.
3. The pilot was properly certified, trained and qualified for the flight.
4. The loss of power on the right engine resulted in the aircraft inability to maintain a safe altitude.
5. The Police and other emergency services response were timely and effective.
6. The depth of the water where the aircraft came to rest made it impossible for the aircraft to be recovered.
7. The aircraft was properly maintained in accordance with Bahamas and United States regulations and maintenance practices.
Final Report:

Crash of a Learjet 35A in Freeport: 9 killed

Date & Time: Nov 9, 2014 at 1652 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N17UF
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Nassau - Freeport
MSN:
258
YOM:
1979
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
9
Captain / Total flying hours:
13800
Copilot / Total flying hours:
996
Aircraft flight hours:
12046
Aircraft flight cycles:
10534
Circumstances:
The aircraft crashed into a garbage and metal recycling plant after striking a towering crane in the Grand Bahama Shipyard, while attempting a second landing approach to runway 06 at Freeport International Airport (MYGF), Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas. The aircraft made an initial ILS instrument approach to Runway 06 at the Freeport International Airport but due to poor visibility and rain at the decision height, the crew executed a go around procedure. The crew requested to hold at the published holding point at 2,000 feet while they waited for the weather to improve. Once cleared for the second ILS approach, the crew proceeded inbound from the holding location to intercept the localizer of the ILS system associated with the instrument approach. During the approach, the crew periodically reported their position to ATC, as the approach was not in a radar environment. The crew was given current weather conditions and advised that the conditions were again deteriorating. The crew continued their approach and descended visually while attempting to find the runway, until the aircraft struck the crane positioned at Dock #2 of the Shipyard at approximately 220 feet above sea level, some 3.2 nautical miles (nm) from the runway threshold. A fireball lasting approximately 3 seconds was observed as a result of the contact between the aircraft and the crane. The right outboard wing, right landing gear and right wingtip fuel tank, separated from the aircraft on impact. This resulted in the aircraft travelling out of control, some 1,578 feet (526 yards) before crashing inverted into a pile of garbage and other debris in the City Services Garbage and Metal Recycling Plant adjacent to the Grand Bahama Shipyard. Both crew and 7 passengers were fatally injured. No person on the ground was injured. The crane in the shipyard that was struck received minimal damages while the generator unit and other equipment in the recycling plant received extensive damages.
Probable cause:
The Air Accident Investigation & Prevention Unit (AAIPU) determines that the probable cause(s) of this accident were:
- The poor decision making of the crew in initiating and continuing a descent in IMC below the authorized altitude, without visual contact with the runway environment.
Contributing Factors includes:
- Improper planning of the approach,
- Failure of the crew to follow the approved ILS approach while in IMC conditions,
- Insufficient horizontal or vertical situational awareness,
- Poor decision making,
- Deliberate actions of the crew by disabling the terrain alert warning system,
- Inadequate CRM practice.
Final Report: