Crash of a Cessna 208B Grand Caravan EX in Snohomish: 4 killed

Date & Time: Nov 18, 2022 at 0935 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N2069B
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Renton - Renton
MSN:
208B-5657
YOM:
2021
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
The single engine airplane departed Renton Airport with four people on board, apparently on a pre-delivery check flight. In unknown circumstances, it went out of control and crashed in a prairie located near Snohomish, bursting into flames. The aircraft was totally destroyed and all four occupants were killed. It is believed that the airplane suffered a wing failure in flight.

Crash of a IAI 1124 Westwind in Goiânia

Date & Time: Aug 7, 2022 at 1050 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
PR-OMX
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Goiânia - Goiânia
MSN:
363
YOM:
1981
Country:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The aircraft departed Goiânia-Nacional de Aviação Airport Runway 14 at 1012LT on a local test flight with three crew members on board. After reaching FL340, several tests were completed then the crew made a high speed descent before landing on runway 32. After touchdown and a course of about 700 metres, the airplane veered off runway to the right, collided with a concrete wall, lost its nose gear and came to rest near the perimeter fence. All three occupants evacuated safely.

Crash of an Antonov AN-26B-100 in Mykhailivka: 1 killed

Date & Time: Apr 22, 2022 at 0900 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
UR-UZB
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Zaporozhie - Zaporozhie
MSN:
113 05
YOM:
1981
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The crew departed Zaporozhie Airport on a local test flight according to local authorities, carrying three crew members. While flying at low height, the airplane collided with power line and crashed in an open field located in Mykhailivka, some 11 km northwest of the airport. A crew member was killed and two others were injured. The aircraft was destroyed.

Crash of an Ilyushin II-112V in Kubinka: 3 killed

Date & Time: Aug 17, 2021 at 1118 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
RF-41400
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Kubinka - Kubinka
MSN:
01-01
YOM:
2008
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
On August 13, the aircraft (first prototype of this new model) departed the aviation plant at Voronezh Airport on a flight to Moscow-Zhukovsky, preparing for a demonstration flight at the 7th Military Technical Forum. On August 17, the crew departed Zhukovsky for a test flight to Kubinka Airport where the aircraft landed at 1109LT. Four minutes after takeoff at 1114LT, while flying at low altitude in a flat attitude, the right engine caught fire. 35 seconds later, while the crew elected to reach the airport, the aircraft rolled to the right, got inverted and crashed in a wooded area located 2,5 km short of runway 22. The aircraft was totally destroyed and all three crew members were killed. This first exemple was dedicated to the Russian Aerospace Forces (Vozdushno-kosmicheskiye sily) and was also registered 01 yellow.
Crew:
Nikolay Dmitrievich Kuimov, test pilot,
Dmitry Komarov, test pilot,
Nikolai Khludeyev, flight engineer.

Crash of a Piper PA-46-350P Malibu Mirage in Cranfield

Date & Time: Apr 29, 2021 at 1425 LT
Operator:
Registration:
G-HYZA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Cranfield - Cranfield
MSN:
46-36130
YOM:
1997
Flight number:
86
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
34620
Captain / Total hours on type:
1588.00
Circumstances:
On the morning of the accident flight, G-HYZA was flown for approximately 16 minutes on test flight 85. The flight test team debriefed the results and prepared the aircraft for flight 86. The plan for this flight was for the HV battery to be switched off at the end of the downwind leg then, if able, to fly three or more circuits at 1,000 ft aal using the HFC only to provide electrical power. The flight test team discussed experimenting with combinations of higher airspeeds and propeller rpm that would reduce the aircraft angle of attack and improve the mass flow of air through the radiator which provided cooling for the HFC. This was considered as a potential strategy to manage a slow rise in temperature in the HFC which they had observed in previous flights when flying on that power source alone. The test card for flight 86 was not amended to reflect this intention. At 1406 hrs, following a normal start using both the HV battery and HFC to provide electrical power, the HV was switched off to preserve its electrical capacity. The aircraft taxied to the holding point and was cleared to line up on Runway 03. The weather was fair with good visibility and light winds from 010°. The aircraft entered the runway and backtracked to the threshold where the pilot commenced a run-up of the propulsion system to ensure the HFC could achieve thermal stability within the flight test parameters. Once the temperatures in the HFC were stable, the pilot switched on the HV battery to bring both power sources online and commenced the takeoff run. As the aircraft accelerated and the power lever was advanced, the observer operated the high temperature override switch to maintain the temperature of the HFC within the operating limits. After takeoff, the pilot turned onto the crosswind leg and climbed to the circuit height of 1,000 ft agl. During the downwind leg of the right-hand circuit, the pilot stated the power was set to 95 kW, the propeller to 2,500 rpm and the airspeed to 100 kt. Once stabilized at these parameters, which were at variance with the flight test card conditions, the observer confirmed that the HFC operating temperatures were within limits. He then instructed the pilot to reduce power to 90 kW to assess the effect on the airspeed, which reduced to approximately 95 kt. The pilot increased the power to 95 kW to regain the target speed. The pilot set the power by reference to his display unit which was located below the throttle quadrant. When he looked up from this task, he recognized that the aircraft was in a late downwind position. He turned onto base leg and commented that they were losing speed in the turn. The observer suggested that they could increase power to 120 kW to regain the lost airspeed, then reduce power before turning off the HV battery to re-establish the test conditions. He also suggested a reduction in propeller rpm. The pilot increased power to 120 kW but did not reduce the propeller rpm. As he started to turn onto final, the pilot briefed that once he had established straight and level flight he would reduce the power slightly and turn off the HV battery leaving the electrical motors powered by the HFC. He called final on the radio and was cleared by ATC to fly through at circuit height. Approaching the runway threshold at approximately 940 ft agl, the pilot reduced power to 90 kW, set the airspeed to 90 kt then selected the HV battery to off. Immediately, all electrical drive to the propeller was lost. The pilot and observer made several unsuccessful attempts to reset the system to restore power from the HFC with the observer stating the action to be taken and the pilot making the switch selection. The observer instructed the pilot to select the HV battery to on to reconnect the alternative power source. HV power was not restored so the observer instructed the pilot to attempt a system reset with the HFC in the off position. Electrical power was still not restored and at 440 ft agl the observer declared “the voltage is too high”, to which the pilot replied, “we’ve got to do something quick”. The observer called for a further reset attempt and adjusted the power lever. The aircraft had now travelled the length of the runway and was at approximately 320 ft aal when the observer reported that power could not be restored. The pilot transmitted a MAYDAY call and initiated a turn to the left to position for a landing on Runway 21. Almost immediately he recognized that he did not have sufficient height to complete the manoeuvre so lowered the landing gear and selected full flap for a forced landing in a field that was now directly ahead on a north-westerly heading. The aircraft touched down at approximately 87 kt ground speed on a level grass field. The pilot applied the brakes, and the aircraft continued its movement until it struck, and passed through, a hedge during which the left wing broke away. The nosewheel and left main wheel entered a ditch and the aircraft came to an abrupt stop. The pilot and observer were uninjured and exited the aircraft through the upper half of the cabin door. The airport fire service arrived quickly at the scene. The observer returned to the aircraft and vented the hydrogen tank to atmosphere and disconnected the HV battery to make the aircraft safe.
Probable cause:
The loss of power occurred during an interruption of the power supply when, as part of the test procedure, the battery was selected off with the intention of leaving the electrical motors solely powered by the hydrogen fuel cell. During this interruption the windmilling propeller generated a voltage high enough to operate the inverter protection system, which locked out the power to the motors. The pilot and observer were unable to reset the system and restore electrical power.
Final Report:

Crash of a Learjet 35A in Belo Horizonte: 1 killed

Date & Time: Apr 20, 2021 at 1430 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
PR-MLA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Belo Horizonte - Belo Horizonte
MSN:
35-072
YOM:
1976
Country:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The crew departed Belo Horizonte-Pampulha Airport for a local test flight. After landing on runway 13, the crew encountered difficulties and the aircraft was unable to stop within the remaining distance. It overran, went through the perimeter fence (striking concrete poles) and came to rest against trees, broken in two. The copilot aged 76 was killed while both other occupants were injured.

Crash of a Cessna 340A in Tatum: 1 killed

Date & Time: Apr 19, 2021 at 1346 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N801EC
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Henderson - Henderson
MSN:
340A-0312
YOM:
1977
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
On April 19, 2021, about 1346 central daylight time, a Cessna 340A airplane, N801EC, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Tatum, Texas. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 flight test. According to information provided by a Fixed Base Operator (FBO) at the East Texas Regional Airport (GGG), the intention of the flight was to do a functional test of a newly upgraded autopilot system. Automatic Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast (ADS-B) data showed that the airplane took off from runway 13 at GGG about 1340. According to preliminary Air Traffic Control (ATC) information provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the controller cleared the pilot to operate under Visual Flight Rules (VFR) to the east of the airport and to remain in class C airspace. Communications between ground control, tower control, and the pilot were normal during the ground taxi, takeoff, and climb-out. Six minutes after takeoff, radio and radar communications were lost and controllers initiated ALNOT procedures. There were no radio distress calls heard from the pilot. After takeoff, ADS-B data showed the airplane in a steady climb to the east of GGG. The airplane climbed to an altitude of 2,750 ft mean sea level (msl) and then descended to 2,675 ft msl. There were no other data points recorded. The accident site was located directly east, about ¾ mile from the last recorded data point. Groundspeeds and headings were consistent throughout the climb, with no abrupt deviations. There were no eyewitnesses to the accident; however, a local resident located about 1 mile from the accident site reported that he was inside his residence when he heard and felt a “boom” that shook the windows. He immediately saw black smoke rise, found the wreckage, and called 911. The accident site was located at an elevation of 361 ft msl. The airplane impacted the vegetated terrain in a nose-down, vertical flight attitude. The fuselage and cabin were embedded into the ground and were mostly consumed from a post-impact fire. The empennage was folded forward over the cabin area. Both left and right wings showed leading edge crushing along their respective spans. Portions of both wings were fire damaged. Both left and right engine nacelles were separated from the wings and the engine and propeller assemblies were embedded in 3-foot-deep craters.

Crash of a Cessna 750 Citation X at La Carlota AFB

Date & Time: Aug 21, 2019 at 1100 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
1060
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
La Carlota - La Carlota
MSN:
750-0134
YOM:
2000
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The crew was engaged in a local test flight at La Carlota-General Francisco de Miranda AFB in Caracas. During the takeoff roll, a tire burst on the right main gear that collapsed and was torn off. The airplane veered off runway to the left then the left main gear collapsed as well and the airplane came to rest on its belly with the nose gear still extended. There were no injuries among the crew.

Crash of a Piper PA-61 Aerostar (Ted Smith 601) in Baton Rouge

Date & Time: Jul 20, 2018 at 1430 LT
Registration:
N327BK
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Baton Rouge - Baton Rouge
MSN:
61-0145-076
YOM:
1973
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
28829
Captain / Total hours on type:
600.00
Aircraft flight hours:
1912
Circumstances:
The mechanic who maintained the airplane reported that, on the morning of the accident, the right engine would not start due to water contamination in the fuel system. The commercial pilot and mechanic purged the fuel tanks, flushed the fuel system, and cleaned the left engine fuel injector nozzles. After the maintenance work, they completed engine ground runs for each engine with no anomalies noted. Subsequently, the pilot ordered new fuel from the local fixed-based operator to complete a maintenance test flight. The pilot stated that he completed a preflight inspection, followed by engine run-ups for each engine with no anomalies noted and then departed with one passenger onboard. Immediately after takeoff, the right engine stopped producing full power, and the airplane would not maintain altitude. No remaining runway was left to land, so the pilot conducted a forced landing to a field about 1 mile from the runway; the airplane landed hard and came to rest upright. Postaccident examination revealed no water contamination in the engines. Examination of the airplane revealed numerous instances of improper and inadequate maintenance of the engines and fuel system. The fuel system contained corrosion debris, and minimal fuel was found in the lines to the fuel servo. Although maintenance was conducted on the airplane on the morning of the accident, the right engine fuel injectors nozzles were not removed during the maintenance procedures; therefore, it is likely that the fuel flow volume was not measured. It is likely that the corrosion debris in the fuel system resulted when the water was recently purged from the fuel system. The contaminants were likely knocked loose during the subsequent engine runs and attempted takeoff, which subsequently blocked the fuel lines and starved the right engine of available fuel.
Probable cause:
The loss of right engine power due to fuel starvation, which resulted from corrosion debris in the fuel lines. Contributing to the accident was the mechanic's and pilot's inadequate maintenance of the airplane before the flight.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft C90A King Air in Mumbai: 5 killed

Date & Time: Jun 28, 2018 at 1315 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VT-UPZ
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Juhu - Juhu
MSN:
LJ-1400
YOM:
1995
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:
Following a technical maintenance, a test flight was scheduled with two engineers and two pilots. The twin engine airplane departed Mumbai-Juhu Airport and the crew completed several manoeuvres over the city before returning. On approach in heavy rain falls, the aircraft went out of control and crashed at the bottom of a building under construction located in the Ghatkopar West district, some 3 km east from Mumbai Intl Airport, bursting into flames. The aircraft was destroyed by impact forces and a post crash fire and all four occupants were killed as well as one people on the ground.