Crash of a Cessna 208 Caravan I in Boituva: 2 killed

Date & Time: May 11, 2022 at 1213 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
PT-OQR
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Boituva - Boituva
MSN:
208-0219
YOM:
1992
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
14
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The single engine airplane departed Boituva Aerodrome on a local skydiving mission, carrying 14 skydivers and one pilot. After takeoff, the pilot apparently encountered electrical problems and elected to return for an emergency landing. Shortly later, the aircraft collided with high tension wires, stalled and crashed inverted in a field. Two passengers were killed while all other occupants were injured.

Crash of a Cessna 208 Caravan I on Mt Grüehorn: 1 killed

Date & Time: Mar 30, 2022 at 1222 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
D-FLIC
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Siegerland – Monte Argentario
MSN:
208-0274
YOM:
1998
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The pilot, sole on board, departed Siegerland Airport at 1100LT on a ferry flight to Monte Argentario, Tuscany. En route, while overflying Switzerland, he encountered marginal weather conditions. While cruising in IMC conditions, the single engine airplane impacted the slope of a rocky and snow covered face located west of Mt Grüehorn, in the south part of the canton of saint Gallen. The wreckage was found at an altitude of 1,700 metres. The aircraft disintegrated on impact and the pilot was killed.

Crash of a Cessna 208 Caravan I in Lake Seul

Date & Time: Mar 8, 2022
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-GIPR
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
208-0343
YOM:
2001
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Few minutes after takeoff from Sioux Lookout, the single engine airplane crash landed on the frozen Lake Seul. The wreckage was found about 30 km northwest of Sioux Lookout. Both occupants were evacuated safely and the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Cessna 208 Caravan I in Ilaga: 1 killed

Date & Time: Oct 25, 2021 at 0810 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
PK-SNN
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Timika - Ilaga
MSN:
208-0556
YOM:
2014
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
On final approach to Ilaga Airport, the crew encountered poor visibility due to foggy conditions. The single engine airplane impacted ground near the runway 25 threshold, lost its undercarriage and slid for few dozen metres before coming to rest on the runway. One of the pilot was killed.

Crash of a Cessna 208 Caravan I off Norderney: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jul 26, 2021 at 1309 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
D-FLEC
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Borkum - Norderney
MSN:
208-0388
YOM:
2005
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The single engine airplane departed Borkum Airport in the early afternoon on a local skydiving mission. At an altitude of 14,000 feet, the skydivers jumped out the cabin then the pilot reduced his altitude and returned to Norderney Airport. On approach, control was lost and the airplane crashed in the sea of Wadden, about 4 km southeast of the airfield. The aircraft was destroyed and the pilot was killed.

Crash of a Cessna 208 Caravan I in Moo 2: 2 killed

Date & Time: Sep 24, 2019 at 0930 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
1917
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Surasi - Surasi
MSN:
208-0267
YOM:
1997
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The crew (one instructor aged 58 and one pilot under supervision aged 28) departed Surasi Air Base around 0900LT on a training flight. En route, in unknown circumstances, the single engine airplane crashed near Moo 2 (Sai Yok district). The aircraft disintegrated on impact and both occupants were killed.

Crash of a Cessna 208 Caravan I in Gransee: 1 killed

Date & Time: Sep 11, 2019 at 1510 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
D-FIDI
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Gransee - Gransee
MSN:
208-0301
YOM:
1999
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
In the mid-afternoon, the single engine airplane departed the grassy runway at Gransee Airfield, carrying 14 skydivers and one pilot on a local flight. After all 14 skydivers jumped out of the cabin, the pilot returned to the airport when, on final approach, the aircraft struck a tree and crashed in unknown circumstances. The airplane was destroyed and the pilot was killed.

Crash of a Cessna 208 Caravan 675 on Addenbroke Island: 4 killed

Date & Time: Jul 26, 2019 at 1104 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-GURL
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
MSN:
208-0501
YOM:
2008
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
8
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
8500
Captain / Total hours on type:
504.00
Aircraft flight hours:
4576
Circumstances:
Seair Seaplanes (Seair) was contracted by a remote fishing lodge on the central coast of British Columbia (BC) (Figure 1) to provide seasonal transport of guests and supplies between Vancouver International Water Aerodrome (CAM9), BC, and the lodge, which is located about 66 nautical miles (NM) north-northwest of Port Hardy Airport (CYZT), BC, and about 29 NM southeast of Bella Bella (Campbell Island) Airport (CBBC), BC. On 26 July 2019, the occurrence pilot arrived at Seair’s CAM9 base at approximately 0630. Over the next hour, the pilot completed a daily inspection of the Cessna 208 Caravan aircraft (registration C-GURL, serial number 20800501), added 300 L of fuel to the aircraft, and began flight planning activities, which included gathering and interpreting weather information. On the morning of the occurrence, 4 Seair visual flight rules (VFR) flights were scheduled to fly to the central coast of BC, all on Caravan aircraft: C-GURL (the occurrence aircraft) was to depart CAM9 at 0730, C-GSAS at 0745, C-FLAC at 0800, and C-GUUS at 0900. The first 3 flights were direct flights to the fishing lodge, while the 4th flight had an intermediate stop at the Campbell River Water Aerodrome (CAE3), BC, to pick up passengers before heading to a research institute located approximately 4 NM southwest of the fishing lodge. Because of poor weather conditions in the central coast region, however, all of the flights were delayed. After the crews referred to weather cameras along the central coast region, the flights began to depart, but in a different order than originally scheduled. It is not uncommon for the order of departure to change when groups of aircraft are going to the same general location. One of Seair’s senior operational staff (operations manager) departed CAM9 at 0850 aboard C-FLAC. C-GUUS, bound for the research institute, departed CAM9 next at 0906, and then the occurrence aircraft departed at 0932 (Table 1). The pilot originally scheduled to fly C-GSAS declined the flight. This pilot had recently upgraded to the Caravan, had never flown to this destination before, and was concerned about the weather at the destination. When Seair’s chief pilot returned to CAM9 at 0953 after a series of scheduled flights on a different type of aircraft, he assumed the last remaining flight to the lodge and C-GSAS departed CAM9 at 1024.After departing the Vancouver terminal control area, the occurrence aircraft climbed to 4500 feet above sea level (ASL) and remained at this altitude until 1023, when a slow descent was initiated. The aircraft levelled off at approximately 1300 feet ASL at 1044, when it was approximately 18 NM northeast of Port Hardy Airport (CYZT), BC, and 57 NM southeast of the destination. At 1050, the occurrence aircraft slowly descended again as the flight continued northbound. During this descent, the aircraft’s flaps were extended to the 10° position. At this point, the occurrence aircraft was 37 NM south-southeast of the fishing lodge. The aircraft continued to descend until it reached an altitude of approximately 330 feet ASL, at 1056. By this point, the occurrence aircraft was being operated along the coastline, but over the ocean. C-FLAC departed from the fishing lodge at 1056 on the return flight to CAM9. C-FLAC flew into the Fitz Hugh Sound and proceeded southbound along the western shoreline. At approximately 1100, it flew through an area of heavy rain where visibility was reduced to about 1 statute mile (SM). C-FLAC descended to about 170 feet ASL and maintained this altitude for the next 5 minutes before climbing to about 300 feet ASL. As the southbound C-FLAC entered Fitz Hugh Sound from the north at Hecate Island, the occurrence aircraft entered Fitz Hugh Sound from the south, near the southern tip of Calvert Island. The occurrence aircraft then changed course from the western to the eastern shoreline, and descended again to about 230 feet ASL (Figure 2), while maintaining an airspeed of approximately 125 knots. The 2 aircraft established 2-way radio contact. The pilot of C-FLAC indicated that Addenbroke Island was visible when he flew past it, and described the weather conditions in the Fitz Hugh Sound to the occurrence pilot as heavy rain showers and visibility of approximately 1 SM around Kelpie Point. The occurrence pilot then indicated that he would maintain a course along the eastern shoreline of the sound. At 1103, the 2 aircraft were separated by 2 NM and passed each other on reciprocal tracks, approximately 4 NM south of the accident site. The occurrence aircraft maintained a consistent track and altitude for the next 54 seconds, then slowly began a 25° change in track to the west (0.35 NM from the Addenbroke Island shoreline). Seven seconds after the turn started (0.12 NM from the island’s shoreline), the aircraft entered a shallow climb averaging 665 fpm. At 1104:55, the occurrence aircraft struck trees on Addenbroke Island at an altitude of approximately 490 feet ASL, at an airspeed of 114 knots, and in a relatively straight and level attitude. The aircraft then continued through the heavily forested hillside for approximately 450 feet, coming to rest at an elevation of 425 feet ASL, 9.7 NM east-southeast of the destination fishing lodge. The pilot and three passengers were killed and five other occupants were injured, four seriously.
Probable cause:
Findings as to causes and contributing factors:
These are conditions, acts or safety deficiencies that were found to have caused or contributed to this occurrence.
1. The flight departed Vancouver International Water Aerodrome even though the reported and forecast weather conditions in the vicinity of the destination were below visual flight rules minima; the decision to depart may have been influenced by the group dynamics of Seair pilots and senior staff at the flight planning stage.
2. The pilot continued flight in reduced visibility, without recognizing the proximity to terrain, and subsequently impacted the rising terrain of Addenbroke Island.
3. The configuration of the visual and aural alerting systems and the colouration ambiguity in the primary flight display of the Garmin G1000 was ineffective at alerting the occurrence pilot to the rising terrain ahead.
4. The occurrence pilot’s attention, vigilance, and general cognitive function were most likely influenced to some degree by fatigue.

Findings as to risk:
These are conditions, unsafe acts or safety deficiencies that were found not to be a factor in this occurrence but could have adverse consequences in future occurrences.
1. If pilots do not receive specialized training that addresses the hazards of their flying environment, there is a risk that they will not be proficient in the specific skills necessary to maintain safety margins.
2. If aircraft are operated in excess of the maximum allowable take-off weight, there is a risk of performance degradation and adverse flight characteristics, which could jeopardize the safety of the flight.
3. If cargo is stowed in front of emergency exits, there is a risk that egress may be impeded in an emergency situation, potentially increasing evacuation time and risk of injuries.
4. If air operators do not employ a methodology to accurately assess threats inherent to daily operations, then there is a risk that unsafe practices will become routine and operators will be unaware of the increased risk.
5. If air operators that have flight data monitoring capabilities do not actively monitor their flight operations, they may not be able to identify drift toward unsafe practices that increase the risk to flight crew and passengers.
6. If Transport Canada’s oversight of operators is insufficient, there is a risk that air operators will be non-compliant with regulations or drift toward unsafe practices, thereby reducing safety margins.
7. If Transport Canada does not make safety management systems mandatory, and does not assess and monitor these systems, there is an increased risk that companies will be unable to effectively identify and mitigate the hazards associated within their operations.

Other findings:
These items could enhance safety, resolve an issue of controversy, or provide a data point for future safety studies.
1. The pilot was actively using a cellphone throughout the flight; the operator provided no guidance or limitations on approved cellphone use in flight.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 208 Caravan I in the Dry Tortugas National Park

Date & Time: Apr 23, 2019 at 1200 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N366TA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Dry Tortugas - Key West
MSN:
208-0249
YOM:
1996
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2407
Captain / Total hours on type:
27.00
Aircraft flight hours:
9506
Circumstances:
The pilot landed the seaplane into an easterly wind, then noticed that the surface wind was greater than forecast. Unable to taxi to the beaching location, he elected to return to his destination. He maneuvered the airplane into the wind and applied takeoff power. He described the takeoff run as "bumpy" and the water conditions as "rough." The pilot reported that the left float departed the airplane at rotation speed, and the airplane subsequently nosed into the water. The pilot and passengers were assisted by a nearby vessel and the airplane subsequently sank into 50 ft of water. Inclement sea and wind conditions prevented recovery of the wreckage for 52 days, and the wreckage was stored outside for an additional 13 days before recovery by the salvage company. Extensive saltwater corrosion prevented metallurgical examination of the landing gear components; however, no indication of a preexisting mechanical malfunction or failure was found.
Probable cause:
The pilot's decision to attempt a takeoff in rough sea conditions, resulting in damage to the floats and the sinking of the seaplane.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 208 Caravan I near Caracaraí

Date & Time: Feb 9, 2019 at 1040 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
PR-RTA
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Manaus - Caracaraí
MSN:
208-0380
YOM:
2004
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
8
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The single engine floatplane departed Manaus-Eduardo Gomes Airport on a charter flight to the area of the Xeriuini River near Caracaraí, carrying eight passengers and two pilots bound for a fish camp. Due to the potential presence of obstacles in the river due to low water level, the crew decided to land near the river bank. After landing, the left wing impacted a tree and the aircraft rotated to the left and came to rest against trees on the river bank. All 10 occupants evacuated safely and the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
The following findings were identified:
- Attention,
- Judgment,
- Perception,
- Management planning,
- Decision making processes,
- Organization processes,
- Support systems.
Final Report: