Country

Crash of a Cessna 208 Caravan I in Lake Seul

Date & Time: Mar 8, 2022
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-GIPR
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
208-0343
YOM:
2001
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Few minutes after takeoff from Sioux Lookout, the single engine airplane crash landed on the frozen Lake Seul. The wreckage was found about 30 km northwest of Sioux Lookout. Both occupants were evacuated safely and the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Beechcraft 350 Super King Air in Thunder Bay

Date & Time: Jan 31, 2022 at 1222 LT
Operator:
Registration:
C-GEAS
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Trenton - Thunder Bay
MSN:
FL-17
YOM:
1990
Country:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Following an uneventful flight from RCAF Trenton on behalf of the RCAF, the twin engine aircraft apparently landed hard at Thunder Bay Airport. After touchdown on runway 25, it went out of control and veered off runway into a snow covered area. All three crew members evacuated safely while the aircraft suffered severe damages to wings and tail. The fuselage also broke in two.

Crash of a Rockwell Grand Commander 690B in Thunder Bay: 1 killed

Date & Time: Aug 16, 2021 at 2130 LT
Operator:
Registration:
C-GYLD
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Thunder Bay – Dryden
MSN:
690-11426
YOM:
1977
Flight number:
BD160
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from runway 12 at Thunder Bay Airport, the twin engine airplane rolled to the left and crashed upside down on runway 07, bursting into flames. The aircraft was totally destroyed and the pilot, sole on board, was killed.

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver in Hawk Junction: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jul 11, 2019 at 0853 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FBBG
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Hawk Junction - Oba Lake
MSN:
358
YOM:
1952
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
1231
Captain / Total hours on type:
409.00
Aircraft flight hours:
17804
Circumstances:
On 11 July 2019, at approximately 0852 Eastern Daylight Time, the float-equipped de Havilland DHC-2 Mk. I Beaver aircraft (registration C-FBBG, serial number 358), operated by Hawk Air, departed from the Hawk Junction Water Aerodrome, on Hawk Lake, Ontario. The aircraft, with the pilot and 1 passenger on board, was on a daytime visual flight rules charter flight. The aircraft was going to drop off supplies at an outpost camp on Oba Lake, Ontario, approximately 35 nautical miles north-northeast of the Hawk Junction Water Aerodrome. The aircraft departed heading northeast. Shortly after takeoff, during the initial climb out, just past the northeast end of Hawk Lake, the aircraft crashed in a steep nose-down attitude, severing a power line immediately before impact, and coming to rest next to a hydro substation. The pilot and the passenger received fatal injuries. The aircraft was destroyed as a result of the impact, but there was no post-impact fire.
Probable cause:
Findings as to causes and contributing factors:
These are conditions, acts or safety deficiencies that were found to have caused or contributed to this occurrence.
1. The aircraft likely departed with the fuel selector set to the rear tank position,which did not contain sufficient fuel for departure. As a result, the engine lost power due to fuel starvation shortly after takeoff during the initial climb.
2. After a loss of engine power at low altitude, a left turn was likely attempted in an effort to either return to the departure lake or head toward more desirable terrain for a forced landing. The aircraft stalled aerodynamically, entered an incipient spin, and subsequently crashed.

Findings as to risk:
These are conditions, unsafe acts or safety deficiencies that were found not to be a factor in this occurrence but could have adverse consequences in future occurrences.
1. If aircraft are not equipped with a stall warning system, pilots and passengers who travel on these aircraft will remain exposed to an elevated risk of injury or death as a result of a stall at low altitude.
2. If air-taxi training requirements do not address the various classes of aircraft and operations included in the sector, there is a risk that significant type-, class-, or operation-specific emergency procedures will not be required to be included in training programs.
3. If seasonal air operators conduct recurrent training at the end of the season rather than at the beginning, there is a risk that pilots will be less familiar with required emergency procedures.
4. If air operators do not tailor their airborne training programs to address emergency procedures that are relevant to their operation, there is a risk that pilots will be unprepared in a real emergency.
5. If pilots and passengers do not use available shoulder harnesses, there is an increased risk of injury in the event of an accident.
Final Report:

Crash of a Swearingen SA226T Merlin IIIB in Arnprior

Date & Time: May 26, 2017
Operator:
Registration:
C-GFPX
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
North Bay - Arnprior
MSN:
T-310
YOM:
1979
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The twin engine airplane departed North Bay on an ambulance flight to Arnprior, carrying two pilots and a doctor. Following an uneventful flight, the crew was cleared for a VOR/DME approach to runway 28 under VFR conditions. On short final, the aircraft descended too low and impacted ground 50 metres short of runway. Upon impact, the nose gear collapsed and the airplane slid for about 600 metres before coming to rest. All three occupants evacuated safely and the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Cessna 208B Grand Caravan near Pickle Lake: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 11, 2015 at 0909 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FKDL
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Pickle Lake – Angling Lake
MSN:
208B-0240
YOM:
1990
Flight number:
WSG127
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
2990
Captain / Total hours on type:
245.00
Aircraft flight hours:
36073
Aircraft flight cycles:
58324
Circumstances:
On 11 December 2015, the pilot of Wasaya Airways Limited Partnership (Wasaya) flight 127 (WSG127) reported for duty at the Wasaya hangar at Pickle Lake Airport (CYPL), Ontario, at about 0815. The air taxi flight was to be the first of 3 cargo trips in the Cessna 208B Caravan (registration C-FKDL, serial number 208B0240) planned from CYPL to Angling Lake / Wapekeka Airport (CKB6), Ontario. The first flight was planned to depart at 0900. The pilot went to the Wasaya apron and conducted a pre-flight inspection of C-FKDL while a ground crew was loading cargo. A Wasaya aircraft fuel-handling technician confirmed with the pilot that the planned fuel load was 600 pounds per wing of Jet A fuel. After completing the fueling, the technician used the cockpit fuel-quantity indicators to verify that the distribution was 600 pounds per wing. The pilot returned to the hangar and received a briefing from the station manager regarding the planned flights. The pilot was advised that the first officer assigned to the flight had been reassigned to other duties in order to increase the aircraft’s available payload and load a snowmobile on board. The pilot completed and signed a Wasaya flight dispatch clearance (FDC) form for WSG127, and filed a copy of it, along with the flight cargo manifests, in the designated location in the company operations room. The FDC for WSG127 showed that the flight was planned to be conducted under visual flight rules (VFR), under company flight-following, at an altitude of 5500 feet above sea level (ASL). Time en route was calculated to be 66 minutes, with fuel consumption of 413 pounds. The pilot returned to the aircraft on the apron. Loading and fueling were complete, and the pilot conducted a final walk-around inspection of C-FKDL. Before entering the cockpit, the pilot conducted an inspection of the upper wing surface. At 0854, the pilot started the engine of C-FKDL and conducted ground checks for several minutes. At 0858, the pilot advised on the mandatory frequency (MF), 122.2 megahertz (MHz), that WSG127 was taxiing for departure from Runway 09 at CYPL. WSG127 departed from Runway 09 at 0900, and, at 0901, the pilot reported on the MF that the flight was airborne. The flight climbed eastward for several miles and then turned left toward the track to CKB6. At about 3000 feet ASL, WSG127 briefly descended about 100 feet over 10 seconds, and then resumed climbing. At 0905, the pilot reported on the MF that WSG127 was clear of the MF zone. WSG127 intercepted the track to CKB6 and climbed northward until the flight reached a peak altitude of about 4600 feet ASL at 0908:41, and then began descending at 0908:46. At 0909:16, the flight made a sharp right turn of about 120° as it descended through about 4000 feet ASL. At 0909:39, the descent ended at about 2800 feet and the aircraft climbed to about 3000 feet ASL before again beginning to descend. At approximately 0910, WSG127 collided with trees and terrain at an elevation of 1460 feet ASL during daylight hours.
Probable cause:
Findings as to causes and contributing factors:
1. Although the aircraft was prohibited from flying in known or forecast icing conditions, Wasaya Airways Limited Partnership (Wasaya) flight 127 (WSG127) was dispatched into forecast icing conditions.
2. The high take-off weight of WSG127 increased the severity of degraded performance when the flight encountered icing conditions.
3. The pilot of WSG127 continued the flight in icing conditions for about 6 minutes, resulting in progressively degraded performance.
4. WSG127 experienced substantially degraded aircraft performance as a result of ice accumulation, resulting in aerodynamic stall, loss of control, and collision with terrain.
5. The Type C pilot self-dispatch procedures and practices in use at Wasaya at the time of the occurrence did not ensure that operational risk was managed to an acceptable level.
6. Wasaya had not implemented all of the mitigation strategies from its January 2015 risk assessment of Cessna 208B operations in known or forecast icing conditions, and the company remained exposed to some unmitigated hazards that had been identified in the risk assessment.
7. There was a company norm of dispatching Cessna 208B flights into forecast icing conditions, although 4 of Wasaya’s 5 Cessna 208B aircraft were prohibited from operating in these conditions.

Findings as to risk:
1. Without effective risk-management processes, aircraft may continue to be dispatched into forecast or known icing conditions that exceed the operating capabilities of the aircraft, increasing the risk of degraded aircraft performance or loss of control.
2. If pilots operating under self-dispatch do not have adequate tools to complete an operational risk assessment before releasing a flight, there is an increased likelihood that hazards will not be identified or adequately mitigated.
3. If aircraft that are not certified for flight in known or forecast icing conditions are dispatched into, and encounter, such conditions, there is an increased risk of degraded performance or loss of control.
4. If aircraft that are certified for flight in known or forecast icing conditions are dispatched into, and encounter, such conditions, at weights exceeding limitations, there is an increased risk of loss of control.
5. If flights are continued in known icing conditions in aircraft that are not certified to do so, there is an increased risk of degraded aircraft performance and loss of control.
6. If operators exceed aircraft manufacturers’ recommended ICEX II servicing intervals, there is an increased risk of degraded aircraft performance or loss of control resulting from greater accretion of ice on the leading-edge de-icing and propeller blade anti-icing boots.
7. If pilots do not receive the minimum required training, there is an increased risk that they will lack the necessary technical knowledge to operate aircraft safely.
8. If pilots are not provided with the information they need to calculate the aircraft’s centre of gravity accurately, they risk departing with their aircraft’s centre of gravity outside the limits, which can lead to loss of control.
9. If emergency locator transmitter antennas and cable connections are not robust enough to survive impact forces, potentially life-saving search-and-rescue operations may be impaired by the absence of a usable signal.

Other findings:
1. Wasaya’s use of a satellite aircraft flight-following system provided early warning of WSG127’s abnormal status and an accurate last known position for search-and-rescue operations.
2. The investigation could not determine whether the autopilot had been used by the pilot of WSG127 at any time during the flight.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft A100 King Air in Timmins

Date & Time: Sep 26, 2014 at 1740 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FEYT
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Moosonee – Timmins
MSN:
B-210
YOM:
1975
Flight number:
CRQ140
Location:
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2400
Captain / Total hours on type:
1000.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
580
Copilot / Total hours on type:
300
Aircraft flight hours:
14985
Aircraft flight cycles:
15570
Circumstances:
The aircraft was operating as Air Creebec flight 140 on a scheduled flight from Moosonee, Ontario, to Timmins, Ontario, with 2 crew members and 7 passengers on board. While on approach to Timmins, the crew selected “landing gear down,” but did not get an indication in the handle that the landing gear was down and locked. A fly-by at the airport provided visual confirmation that the landing gear was not fully extended. The crew followed the Quick Reference Handbook procedures and selected the alternate landing-gear extension system, but they were unable to lower the landing gear manually. An emergency was declared, and the aircraft landed with only the nose gear partially extended. The aircraft came to rest beyond the end of Runway 28. All occupants evacuated the aircraft through the main entrance door. No fire occurred, and there were no injuries to the occupants. Emergency services were on scene for the evacuation. The accident occurred during daylight hours, at 1740 Eastern Daylight Time.
Probable cause:
Findings as to causes and contributing factors:
1. During the extension of the landing gear, a wire bundle became entangled around the landing-gear rotating torque shaft, preventing full extension of the landing gear.
2. The entanglement by the wire bundle also prevented the alternate landing-gear extension system from working. The crew was required to conduct a landing with only the nose gear partially extended.
Other findings:
1. The wire bundle consisted of wiring for the generator control circuits, and when damaged, disabled both generators. The battery became the only source of electrical power until the aircraft landed.
Final Report:

Crash of a De Havilland DHC-2 Beaver near Kennedy Lake

Date & Time: Jun 25, 2014 at 1425 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FHVT
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Sudbury - Kennedy Lake
MSN:
284
YOM:
1952
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3500
Captain / Total hours on type:
1000.00
Circumstances:
The Sudbury Aviation Limited float-equipped de Havilland DHC-2 Beaver aircraft (registration C-FHVT, serial number 284) was on approach to Kennedy Lake, Ontario, with the pilot and 2 passengers on board, when the aircraft rolled to the left prior to the flare. The pilot attempted to regain control of the aircraft by applying full right rudder and right aileron. The attempt was unsuccessful and the aircraft struck rising tree-covered terrain above the shoreline. The aircraft came to a stop on its right side and on a slope. The pilot and the passenger in the rear seat received minor injuries. The passenger in the right front seat was not injured. All were able to walk to the company fishing camp on the lake. There was no fire and the 406 megahertz emergency locator transmitter (ELT) was manually activated by one of the passengers. One of the operator's other aircraft, a Cessna 185, flew to the lake after C-FHVT became overdue. A search and rescue aircraft, responding to the ELT, also located the accident site. Radio contact between the Cessna 185 and the search and rescue aircraft confirmed that their assistance would not be required. The accident occurred at 1425 Eastern Daylight Time.
Probable cause:
Prior to touchdown in a northerly direction, the aircraft encountered a gusty westerly crosswind and the associated turbulence. This initiated an un-commanded yaw and left wing drop indicating an aerodynamic stall. The pilot was unsuccessful in recovering full control of the aircraft and it impacted rising terrain on the shore approximately 30 feet above the water surface.
Final Report:

Crash of a Swearingen SA227AC Metro III in Red Lake: 5 killed

Date & Time: Nov 10, 2013 at 1829 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FFZN
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Sioux Lookout - Red Lake
MSN:
AC-785B
YOM:
1991
Flight number:
BLS311
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
5150
Captain / Total hours on type:
3550.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
2200
Copilot / Total hours on type:
1060
Aircraft flight hours:
35474
Circumstances:
Flight from Sioux Lookout was uneventful till the final descent to Red Lake completed by night and in light snow with a ceiling at 2,000 feet and visibility 8 SM. On final approach to runway 26, crew reported south of the airport and declared an emergency. Shortly after this mayday message, aircraft hit power cables and crashed in flames in a dense wooded area located 800 meters south of the airport. Two passengers seating in the rear were seriously injured while all five other occupants including both pilots were killed.
Probable cause:
A first-stage turbine wheel blade in the left engine failed due to a combination of metallurgical issues and stator vane burn-through. As a result of the blade failure, the left engine continued to operate but experienced a near-total loss of power at approximately 500 feet above ground level, on final approach to Runway 26 at the Red Lake Airport. The crew were unable to identify the nature of the engine malfunction, which prevented them from taking timely and appropriate action to control the aircraft. The nature of the engine malfunction resulted in the left propeller being at a very low blade angle, which, together with the landing configuration of the aircraft, resulted in the aircraft being in an increasingly high drag and asymmetric state. When the aircraft’s speed reduced below minimum control speed (VMC), the crew lost control at an altitude from which a recovery was not possible.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft D18S off Red Lake: 2 killed

Date & Time: May 30, 2013 at 1727 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
C-FWWV
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Red Lake - Red Lake
MSN:
A-618
YOM:
1951
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The pilot and his wife, a couple from Phoenix, were performing a flight from the Red Lake Seaplane base to a tourist Camp located north of Red Lake. The twin engine aircraft took off at 1727LT in marginal weather conditions consisting of wind and rain showers. Shortly after departure, the aircraft crashed into the Bruce Channel located between Cochenour and McKenzie Island. The aircraft sank and both occupants were killed.