Crash of a Lockheed KC-130J Hercules into the Pacific Ocean: 5 killed

Date & Time: Dec 6, 2018 at 0200 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Iwakuni - Iwakuni
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:
The crew departed Iwakuni Airport on a refuelling training mission over the Pacific Ocean. By night and in unknown circumstances, the four engine airplane collided with a McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet. Both aircraft went out of control and crashed into the ocean some 200 miles off Muroto Cape, Japan. The United States Marine Corps confirms that two Marines have been found. One is in fair condition and the other has been declared deceased by competent medical personnel. All five crew members from the Hercules are still missing after two days of SAR operations and presumed dead.

Crash of a Lockheed KC-130T Hercules near Itta Bena: 16 killed

Date & Time: Jul 10, 2017 at 1630 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
165000
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Cherry Point - El Centro
MSN:
5303
YOM:
1992
Crew on board:
16
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
16
Circumstances:
The aircraft left MCAS Cherry Point-Cunningham Field in the early afternoon for a refueling mission. En route, in unclear circumstances, the aircraft went out of control, dove into the ground and apparently crashed in a flat attitude in a soybeans field located 7 miles southwest of Itta Bena. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and a post crash fire and all 16 occupants have been killed. They were en route to NAS El Centro, California. The aircraft was delivered in December 1992.

Crash of a Boeing KC-135R Stratotanker near Chaldovar: 3 killed

Date & Time: May 3, 2013 at 1448 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
63-8877
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Bishkek - Bishkek
MSN:
18725/708
YOM:
1964
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
On 3 May 2013, at approximately 1448 hours local time (L), a KC-135R, tail number 63-8877, assigned to the 22d Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron, 376th Air Expeditionary Wing, Transit Center at Manas, Kyrgyz Republic, crashed in the foothills of mountains located 6 miles south of Chaldovar, Kyrgyz Republic. The mishap crew (MC), which consisted of the mishap pilot (MP), mishap co-pilot (MCP), and mishap boom operator (MBO), perished during the accident. The mishap aircraft (MA) exploded inflight, impacted the terrain at three main locations, and burned. The MA was completely destroyed with total loss to government property estimated at $66.3 million. Upon impact, approximately 228 cubic meters of soil were contaminated with jet fuel, and three distinct craters containing a burn pattern were created. The MA’s mission was to refuel coalition aircraft in Afghanistan and then return to the Transit Center at Manas. Immediately after takeoff, the MA experienced an unexpected rapid heading change from the direction of flight known as a crab. During climb, nearly continuous rudder hunting caused the MA’s nose to hunt slowly left and right about one degree in both directions. The MP commented on the lateral control challenges and possible series yaw damper (SYD) malfunction but continued the mission without turning off either the SYD or rudder power. Approximately nine minutes into the flight, the MA began a series of increasing yaw and roll oscillations known as a dutch roll, which was undiagnosed by the MC. The MCP attempted to decrease these oscillations using manual aileron controls, as well as two brief attempts with the autopilot. The manual corrective inputs kept the oscillations from growing. The autopilot use further exacerbated the situation, and the oscillations intensified. After the second autopilot use, the MP assumed control of the MA and used left rudder to start a left turn. A subsequent series of alternating small rudder inputs, caused by the MA’s dutch roll-induced acceleration forces varying the MP’s foot pressure on the rudder pedals, sharply increased the dutch roll oscillations. Within 30 seconds, the MP made a right rudder input to roll out of the turn, exacerbating the dutch roll condition. The cumulative effects of the malfunctioning SYD, coupled with autopilot use and rudder movements during the unrecognized dutch roll, generated dutch roll forces that exceeded the MA’s design structural limits. The tail section failed and separated from the aircraft, causing the MA to pitch down sharply, enter into a high-speed dive, explode inflight and subsequently impact the ground at approximately 1448L.
Crew:
Cpt Victoria Ann Pinckney,
Cpt Mark Tyler Voss,
T/Sgt Herman Mackey III.
Probable cause:
The board president found, by clear and convincing evidence, the cause of the mishap was the MA’s tail section separating due to structural overstress as a result of the MC’s failure to turn off either the SYD (Series Yaw Damper) or the rudder power and oscillating dutch roll-induced acceleration forces translating through the MP’s feet as the MP used rudder during the unrecognized dutch roll condition. Additionally, the board president found, by a preponderance of evidence, that the dutch roll was instigated by the MA’s malfunctioning Flight Control Augmentation System that caused directional instability or rudder hunting which substantially contributed to this mishap. Other substantially contributing factors include insufficient organizational training programs, crew composition, and cumbersome procedural guidance.
Final Report:

Crash of a Boeing 707-321B at Point Mugu NAS

Date & Time: May 18, 2011 at 1727 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N707AR
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Point Mugu NAS - Point Mugu NAS
MSN:
20029/790
YOM:
1969
Flight number:
OME70
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
5117
Captain / Total hours on type:
2730.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
4052
Copilot / Total hours on type:
2900
Aircraft flight hours:
47856
Aircraft flight cycles:
15186
Circumstances:
On May 18, 2011, about 1727 Pacific daylight time, a modified Boeing 707, registration N707AR, operating as Omega Aerial Refueling Services (Omega) flight 70 crashed on takeoff from runway 21 at Point Mugu Naval Air Station, California (KNTD). The airplane collided with a marsh area to the left side beyond the departure end of the runway and was substantially damaged by postimpact fire. The three flight crewmembers sustained minor injuries. The flight was conducted under the provisions of a contract between Omega and the US Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) to provide aerial refueling of Navy F/A-18s in offshore warning area airspace. According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Omega, and the US Navy, the airplane was operating as a nonmilitary public aircraft under the provisions of 49 United States Code Sections 40102 and 40125. The accident flight crew consisted of a captain, first officer, and flight engineer who had flown with each other many times previously. The crewmembers reported conducting a normal preflight inspection. As the airplane taxied toward the runway, the reported wind was from 280º magnetic at 24 knots, gusting to 34 knots; the flight crew reported that the windsock showed very little change in the wind direction and a slight amount of gust. The crew had calculated a takeoff decision speed (V1) of 141 knots and a rotation speed (Vr) of 147 knots. The crew elected to add 5 knots to the rotation speed to compensate for the wind gusts and briefed a maximum power takeoff. The first officer, who was the pilot monitoring, stated that he advised the captain, who was the pilot flying, about advancing the power relatively smoothly to avoid a compressor stall with the crosswind, and the captain agreed. About 1723, air traffic control cleared the flight for takeoff from runway 21 and instructed the crew to turn left to a heading of 160º after departure. The captain applied takeoff thrust, and the first officer told investigators that, as the pilot in the right seat, he applied forward pressure on the yoke and right aileron input to compensate for the right crosswind. According to the crew, the takeoff roll was normal. At rotation speed, the captain rotated the airplane to an initial target pitch attitude of 11º airplane nose up. Shortly after liftoff, when the airplane was about 20 feet above the runway and about 7,000 feet down the runway, all three crewmembers heard a loud noise and observed the thrust lever for the No. 2 (left inboard) engine rapidly retard to the aft limit of the throttle quadrant. The captain stated that he applied full right rudder and near full right aileron to maintain directional control and level the wings, but the airplane continued to drift to the left. The captain reported that he perceived the airplane would not continue to climb and decided to “put it back on the ground.” Witnesses and a cell phone video from another Omega 707 crewmember observing the takeoff indicated that the No. 2 (left inboard) engine separated and traveled up above the left wing as the airplane was passing abeam taxiway A2. The inlet cowling for the No. 1 (left outboard) engine separated immediately thereafter, consistent with being struck by the No. 2 engine nacelle. The airplane began to descend with the remaining three engine power levers at maximum power, and the left wing dipped slightly (Pratt & Whitney indicated that loss of the inlet cowling on the No. 1 engine would increase drag, effectively resulting in less than zero thrust output). The captain said he lowered the nose and leveled the wings just as the airplane touched down on the runway between taxiway A2 and A1. The airplane made multiple contacts with the runway before drifting left and departing the runway surface before the airplane reached taxiway A1. The airplane crossed taxiway A and came to rest in the marsh area. According to the flight crewmembers, they observed flames in the cabin area and did not have time to perform an engine shutdown or evacuation checklist. The crew reported difficulty exiting the cockpit due to mud and debris blocking the cockpit door. All three crewmembers successfully evacuated through the left forward entrance via the escape slide.
Probable cause:
The NTSB determines that the probable cause of this accident was the failure of a midspar fitting, which was susceptible to fatigue cracking and should have been replaced with a newer, more fatigue-resistant version of the fitting as required by an airworthiness directive. Also causal was an erroneous maintenance entry made by a previous aircraft owner, which incorrectly reflected that the newer fitting had been installed.
Final Report:

Crash of a Boeing KC-135E Stratotanker at Geilenkirchen AFB: 4 killed

Date & Time: Jan 13, 1999 at 2055 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
59-1452
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Geilenkirchen - Geilenkirchen
MSN:
17940
YOM:
1960
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
The aircraft was returning to Geilenkirchen NATO AFB following a refueling mission over Germany on behalf of the 141st Air Refueling Wing in Fairchild, WA. On final approach by night, the crew apparently initiated a go-around procedure when the aircraft pitched up to an angle of 7,5°, stalled and crashed in a wooded area. The aircraft was destroyed and all four occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
It is believed that the loss of control occurred after the runway trim motor failed on approach which was unnoticed by the crew, causing the aircraft to nose up when power was applied. The cause of the runaway motor remains unknown.

Crash of a Lockheed C-141B-LM Starlifter near Harlem: 7 killed

Date & Time: Nov 30, 1992 at 2120 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
65-0255
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
McChord - McChord
MSN:
300-6106
YOM:
1965
Location:
Crew on board:
7
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
7
Aircraft flight hours:
37744
Circumstances:
The aircraft departed McChord AFB on an air refuelling mission over Montana. While cruising at an altitude of 25,000 feet by night, the aircraft collided under unknown circumstances with a second USAF Lockheed C-141B-LM Starlifter registered 66-0142, carrying six crew members and taking part to the same mission. Both aircraft entered an uncontrolled descent, disintegrated in the air and crashed about 14 km north of Harlem. All 13 occupants in both aircraft were killed.

Crash of a Lockheed C-141B-LM Starlifter near Harlem: 6 killed

Date & Time: Nov 30, 1992 at 2120 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
66-0142
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
McChord - McChord
MSN:
300-6168
YOM:
1966
Location:
Crew on board:
6
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Aircraft flight hours:
31857
Circumstances:
The aircraft departed McChord AFB on an air refuelling mission over Montana. While cruising at an altitude of 25,000 feet by night, the aircraft collided under unknown circumstances with a second USAF Lockheed C-141B-LM Starlifter registered 65-0255, carrying seven crew members and taking part to the same mission. Both aircraft entered an uncontrolled descent, disintegrated in the air and crashed about 14 km north of Harlem. All 13 occupants in both aircraft were killed.

Ground explosion of a Boeing KC-135E Stratotanker at Eielson AFB: 2 killed

Date & Time: Sep 20, 1989 at 1500 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
57-1481
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Eielson - Eielson
MSN:
17552
YOM:
1958
Crew on board:
7
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
Following an uneventful refueling mission, the crew returned to Eielson AFB. After landing, the aircraft was parked on the apron and when the crew shut down the engine, an explosion occurred. The aircraft was totally destroyed by fire and two crew members were killed while five others were rescued.
Probable cause:
It was determined that a fuel pump overheated, causing an explosion after contacting fuel vapor.

Crash of a Boeing KC-135A-BN Stratotanker at Dyess AFB: 19 killed

Date & Time: Jan 31, 1989 at 1210 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
63-7990
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Dyess - Hickham
MSN:
18607
YOM:
1963
Location:
Crew on board:
7
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
12
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
19
Circumstances:
Shortly after liftoff from runway 16 at Dyess AFB, while climbing to a height of about 60-100 feet, the aircraft banked right, causing the right wing to struck the ground. Out of control, the aircraft crashed in a huge explosion and was totally destroyed by impact forces and a post crash fire. All 19 occupants were killed, among them army officer and family members including spouses and children.
Probable cause:
It is believed that vapor was coming out from an engine, maybe due to a technical problem on the water injection system.

Crash of a Boeing KC-135A-BN Stratotanker in Oscoda: 6 killed

Date & Time: Oct 11, 1988 at 1420 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
60-0317
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Oscoda - Oscoda
MSN:
18092
YOM:
1960
Crew on board:
6
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
10
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Circumstances:
Following a steep approach at Oscoda-Wurtsmith Airport in crosswind conditions, the four engine aircraft landed hard. Upon landing, it went out of control, veered off runway and came to rest, bursting into flames. Six crew members were killed while 10 others were injured. The aircraft was destroyed by a post crash fire.