Zone

Crash of a Swearingen SA226AC Metro II in Fort Wayne: 1 killed

Date & Time: Nov 9, 2000 at 0123 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N731AC
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Fort Wayne-Milwaukee
MSN:
TC-255
YOM:
1978
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
2870
Captain / Total hours on type:
75.00
Aircraft flight hours:
20885

Crash of a Learjet 24 in Muscatine

Date & Time: Jan 16, 1997 at 1428 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N991TD
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Fort Wayne-Muscatine
MSN:
24-124
YOM:
1966
Location:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
6200
Captain / Total hours on type:
700.00

Crash of a Beechcraft E18 in Detroit: 3 killed

Date & Time: Mar 10, 1988 at 0026 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N900WP
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Detroit-Fort Wayne
MSN:
BA-298
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
1764
Captain / Total hours on type:
375.00

Crash of a Boeing 707 in Kansas City: 4 killed

Date & Time: Apr 13, 1987 at 2155 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N144SP
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Oklahoma City-Wichita-Kansas City-Fort Wayne
MSN:
19209
YOM:
1966
Flight number:
BV721
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
10000
Captain / Total hours on type:
3500.00

Crash of a Cessna 414 Chancellor in Indiana: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jul 5, 1984 at 0905 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N59DB
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Fort Wayne-Atlanta
MSN:
414-0260
YOM:
1979
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
650
Captain / Total hours on type:
200.00

Crash of a Piper PA-31-310 Navajo in Fort Wayne: 1 killed

Date & Time: Oct 20, 1970 at 1138 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N6637L
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Charlotte - Fort Wayne
MSN:
31-575
YOM:
1969
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
1545
Captain / Total hours on type:
495.00
Circumstances:
On approach to Fort Wayne Airport, the pilot encountered limited visibility due to poor weather conditions (fog, rain falls and low clouds). He reduced his altitude to minimum and lost control of the airplane while completing a steep turn at low altitude. The airplane struck the ground and crashed in flames. The pilot, sole on board, was killed.
Probable cause:
Improper IFR operation on part of the pilot who failed to obtain/maintain flying speed on final approach. The following factors were reported:
- Low ceiling, rain and fog,
- Weather conditions slightly worse than forecast,
- Descended below published approach minimums,
- Lost control during steep low altitude turn.
Final Report:

Crash of a Douglas DC-3A-197 in Fort Wayne: 11 killed

Date & Time: Apr 28, 1951 at 1932 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N16088
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Cleveland – Fort Wayne – South Bend – Chicago
MSN:
1927
YOM:
1937
Flight number:
UA129
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
8
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
11
Captain / Total flying hours:
6827
Captain / Total hours on type:
5694.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
1121
Copilot / Total hours on type:
121
Aircraft flight hours:
43550
Circumstances:
Flight 129 departed Cleveland, Chic, at 1807, April 28, 1951, for Chicago, Illinois, with stops scheduled at Fort Wayne and South Bend, Indiana The crew consisted of Captain E K Swallow, First Officer H R Miller, and Stewardess Beverly Fllis, there were eight passengers on board at the time of departure The aircraft weighed 24,180 pounds, which was within the certificated gross weight limit of 25,320 pounds, and the load was properly distributed A flight plan filed by the crew with ARTC (Air Route Traffic Control) indicated an IFR (instrument flight rule) flight at a cruising altitude of 4,000 feet with South Bend and Toledo, Ohio, designated as the alternate airports The "Trip Weather Analysis" (a form prepared by the crew before departure) indicated that scattered cumulus and thunderstorms were expected south of the course to Fort Wayne Also, that a squall line extending in a north-south direction was moving eastward across Illinois and Indiana at an estimated speed of 35 miles per hour and was expected to be in the vicinity of South bend upon the flight's arrival there. After takeoff, Flight 129 was advised by company radio that it was cleared by ARTC via Green Airway No 3 over Sandusky, Ohio, to the Toledo range, to maintain 3,000 feet and to contact Toledo approach control upon arriving there Flight 129 advised they were going to Fort Wayne and not Toledo Accordingly, ARTC amended the flight's clearance to proceed to Fort Wayne via Green Airway No 3 and Blue Airway No 44 and to maintain 4,000 feet The flight proceeded and a routine company radio report was made when over Sandusky At 1847, the flight reported over Toledo and estimated its arrival Fort Wayne at 1932 At this time, the Fort Wayne 1830 weather sequence report was given the flight which was, "ceiling estimated 25,000 feet, thin Broken clouds, visibility 0 miles, wind southwest 5 miles per hours "Seventeen minutes later at 190', flight 129 called Toledo tower and requested, through APTC permission to cruise at 2,300 feet because of turbulent conditions This was not approved because of other traffic At 1920 the flight reported it was approaching Fort Wayne and was changing to tower frequency The flight reported again when nineteen in less northeast of Bauer Field and was advised at Runway 22 was the runway in use and that the wind was five to ten miles per hour from the southwest At the time this transmission was made there was a moderate amount of station and the flight reported "We are not recanting you very clearly but I think you said, `Straight 11 runway 22' We will call later, closer in ". Because of thunderstorm activity in the area, three other aircraft were requesting instructions to land at approximately the time Flight 129 was making its approach Two of these aircraft landed successfully and the pilot of one, upon request, advisee the tower that the thunderstorm was approximately ten miles west of the airport. At the time the four aircraft were approaching Baer Field, United *** 12 degrees was number four to land in the traffic pattern immediately behind *** World Airlines' Flight 240, a DC-3 aircraft then these latter aircraft were approximately one and two and one-half miles, respectively, from the approach end of Runway 22, the wind at the airport shifted to west-northwest and increased in velocity from 5-10 miles per hour to 40 miles per hour Both flights were advised by the tower of the sudden change of wind direction and increased velocity, and a landing on Runway 27 was suggested, it being more nearly into the wind Upon receiving this message the flights immediately turned to the left to align with this runway. When these aircraft were east of the airport the wind increased to 60-65 miles per hour with gusts to 85 miles per hour and a heavy rainfall began, accompanied by lightning and severe static The flights were quickly advised of the weather change but, due to the sudden decrease in visibility, neither flight was seen again by the tower Flight 129 immediately advised, "United 129 heading east" This was closely followed by a message from TWA's 240, "Pulling out" In order to avoid a possible collision the tower then requested separation altitudes for these aircraft from Chicago ARTC and was advised that Flight 129 was assigned an altitude of 4,000 feet and that Flight 240 was assigned 3,000 feet Both clearances were broadcast from the tower several times without acknowledgment. At 1932 m orange-colored flash was seen to the east-southeast from the tower It was later determined that United's Flight 129 had crashed in a field 2 6 miles east-southeast of the airport TWA's Flight 240 proceeded safely to Toledo. The aircraft disintegrated on impact and all 11 occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
The Board determines that the probable cause of the accident was the severe down draft encountered which caused the aircraft to strike the ground in a near level attitude. The following findings were reported:
- The squall line moved across northern Illinois and northern Indiana considerably faster than was forecast,
- A line of thunderstorms was known to be approaching Fort Wayne However, it was believed that aircraft in the area could effect safe landings prior to the storm's arrival there,
- When the subject flight and another were approaching Runway 27, they were advised of the surface wind's increased velocity to 65 miles per hour with gusts to 85 miles per hour,
- When the approach was abandoned the aircraft encountered the forward edge of the squall line and was subjected to a severe down draft from which recovery could not be made.
Final Report:

Crash of a Curtiss C-46F-1-CU Commando in Teterboro: 1 killed

Date & Time: May 27, 1950 at 1729 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N9406H
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Teterboro – Fort Wayne – Detroit
MSN:
22582
YOM:
1945
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
3200
Captain / Total hours on type:
200.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
2800
Copilot / Total hours on type:
160
Circumstances:
At 1727 the aircraft was cleared to Runway 19 for takeoff toward the south. The engines were run up to a manifold pressure of 15 inches of mercury and ignition was checked on both magnetos of each engine. Takeoff was then started and the manifold pressure was increased to 52 inches of mercury. Ground witnesses estimated that the takeoff run as somewhat longer than usual for this model aircraft. Tower personnel and several ground witnesses saw puffs of black smoke coming from the left engine immediately after the takeoff. At an altitude estimated as 200-300 feet, the left engine started to misfire. The landing gear had been raised and was checked for position. The left engine continued misfiring and shortly became worse. The left propeller as feathered. Ahead, the terrain as flat, unobstructed and marshy. Full power was maintained on the right engine and a left turn was started as if to return to the airport. At this point the altitude was estimated to be 400-500 feet. During the turn the air speed fell to 85-90 1 PH and the aircraft settled. This turning and settling continued until the aircraft neared the ground, when it was leveled laterally. It struck while about level, both laterally and longitudinally, and slid along the omen ground in a generally northeasterly direction for some 620 feet where it struck some large trees and turned to the left about 180 degrees. Both captain and copilot were thrown clear of the wreckage. The captain later died from his injuries. The weather was good and was not a factor in the accident.
Probable cause:
The Board determines that the probable cause of the accident was overloading of the aircraft due to faulty loading end dispatch procedures coupled with engine malfunctioning due to inadequate maintenance.
The following factors were noted:
- The aircraft's was leaded above its maximum gross weight by approximately 5,000 pounds,
- The aircraft had been flown in excess of its 80-hour inspection period,
- Both engines were inadequately maintained,
- The ignition systems of both engines were found to be defective,
- The left engine malfunctioned and its propeller was feathered shortly after takeoff at an air speed of 130-135 miles per hour,
- A left turn was made and the air speed fell sharply to 85-90 miles per hour,
- The aircraft settled to the ground in a near stalled condition.
Final Report:

Crash of a Douglas C-47A-80-DL in Louisville: 4 killed

Date & Time: Mar 22, 1944 at 1755 LT
Operator:
Registration:
43-15303
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Fort Wayne - Louisville
MSN:
19769
YOM:
1944
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
On final approach to Louisville-Bowman Airport, the captain decided to attempt a go around for unknown reason. He retracted the landing gear and increased both engine power. The aircraft climbed to a height of 400 feet when it yawed to the left, stalled and crashed onto the tarmac. One crew was seriously injured while all four other crew were killed. The aircraft was destroyed as well as four Aeronca L-3B and three Taylorcraft L-2M.