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Crash of a Piper PA-60-602P in Kokomo: 1 killed

Date & Time: Oct 5, 2019 at 1700 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N326CW
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
MSN:
60-0869-8165008
YOM:
1981
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
Less than two minutes after takeoff from Kokomo-Municipal Airport, while in initial climb, the twin engine airplane entered an uncontrolled descent and crashed in a soybean located 3,5 miles south of the airfield. The aircraft was destroyed and the pilot, sole on board, was killed.

Crash of a Cessna S550 Citation II in Indianapolis: 2 killed

Date & Time: May 22, 2019 at 1243 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N311G
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Indianapolis - Minden
MSN:
550-0041
YOM:
1985
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from Indianapolis-Regional Airport, while climbing, the airplane went out of control and crashed in flames in an open field located few miles from the airfield. The aircraft was totally destroyed upon impact and both occupants were killed.

Crash of a Cessna 525 CitationJet Cj2+ in Memphis: 3 killed

Date & Time: Nov 30, 2018 at 1028 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N525EG
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Jeffersonville – Chicago
MSN:
525-0449
YOM:
2009
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
The airplane collided with trees and terrain near Memphis, Indiana. The airline transport certificated pilot and 2 passengers were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was owned and operated by EstoAir LLC under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight which operated on an instrument flight rules flight plan. The cross-country flight departed Clark Regional Airport (JVY), Jeffersonville, Indiana, about 1025, with Chicago Midway Airport (MDW), Chicago, Illinois, as the intended destination. According to preliminary information from radar data and air traffic controllers, the airplane was climbing through 6,000 ft mean sea level when it began a left turn, descended, and disappeared from radar. The pilot had previously been given a frequency change, which was acknowledge, however the pilot never reported to the next controller and no distress message was heard on either frequency. An alert notice (ALNOT) was issued for the airplane. According to local law enforcement, residents near the accident site heard an airplane flying low followed by a loud noise. The airplane wreckage was in slightly rugged, wooded area and the debris field was oriented on a heading of east. The first impact point was identified at the tops of several trees. A large divot was located beneath and to the east of the trees and then the airplane was found fragmented in numerous pieces. The right engine was measured almost 400 from the initial impact point. All major airplane components were accounted for at the accident site. There was evidence of a post-impact fire. The wreckage was documented on-scene and recovered to a secure facility for further examination.

Crash of a Cessna 525 Citation CJ4 in Marion

Date & Time: Apr 2, 2018 at 1709 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N511AC
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Jackson - Marion
MSN:
525C-0081
YOM:
2012
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On April 2, 2018, about 1709 eastern standard time, a Cessna 525 business jet, N511AC, registered to Avis Industrial Corporation, of Upland, Indiana, sustained substantial damage when it was struck by a Cessna 150 airplane, N5614E, while rolling out after landing at the Marion Municipal Airport (MZZ), Marion, Indiana. The airline transport pilot and 4 passengers of the Cessna 525 were not injured and the private pilot and passenger of the Cessna 150 sustained fatal injuries . Visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area. Both flights were being conducted under the provisions of Federal Code of Regulations Part 91. The Cessna 525 was landing on runway 22 after an IFR flight that originated from Jackson, Michigan, and the Cessna 150 was departing on runway 15 at MZZ a local VFR personal flight. Examination of the accident site showed that the Cessna 150 had struck the empennage of the Cessna 525 at the intersection of runways 15 and 22. Evidence at the intersection showed that the airplanes came together perpendicular to each other. The Cessna 150 then impacted the ground and a post-crash fire ensued. The Cessna 525 continued to roll out on runway 22. There were three witnesses to the accident, located in the airport lounge, within hearing distance of the UNICOM radio. Each witness reported seeing the Cessna 150 just airborne when it struck the empennage of the Cessna 525. Two of the witnesses stated that they heard the Cessna 150 pilot on runway 15 UNICOM frequency. The surviving pilot of the Cessna 525 stated that he did not see the departing Cessna 150 while he was on a straight-in approach to runway 22, nor did he see the 150 during the landing roll. He stated that he did not recall making a radio call on UNICOM, but did utilize his on board Traffic Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) system while on approach. He stated that the TCAS did not show any traffic on the airport. Passengers aboard the Cessna 525 were interviewed and all reported that they did not see the Cessna 150 on the approach or during the landing roll. The reported weather at MZZ at the time of the accident was VFR with 4 miles of visibility due to haze. Also, at the departure and arrival ends of runway 15/33, there was a sign stating, "Traffic Using Runway 4/22 Cannot Be Seen, Monitor Unicom 122.7." At the departure and arrival ends of runway 4/22, there was a sign stating, "Traffic Using 15/33 cannot Be Seen, Monitor Unicom 122.7." The MKK airport does not have a control tower. The Cessna 525 was equipped with a cockpit voice recorder (CVR). The CVR was removed and transported to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Lab, Washington, DC.

Crash of a Cessna 441 Conquest II in Owesco: 3 killed

Date & Time: Feb 22, 2018 at 1939 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N771XW
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Eagle Creek Airpark - Green Bay
MSN:
441-0065
YOM:
1978
Location:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
On February 22, 2018, at 1939 eastern standard time, A Cessna 441 Conquest II airplane, N771XW, impacted terrain following a loss of control in Rossville, Indiana. The airline transport rated pilot and two passengers were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by Ponderosa Aviation LLC under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight. Night instrument meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was operating on an instrument flight plan. The flight originated from the Eagle Creek Airpark (EYE), Indianapolis, Indiana, about 1920, with an intended destination of the Green Bay Austin Straubel International Airport (GRB), Green Bay, Wisconsin. Shortly after takeoff the pilot deviated from the assigned heading and altitude. When questioned by the Indianapolis departure controller, the pilot replied that the airplane was out of control. The pilot then turned the airplane to a heading 90° and explained to the controller that he had a trim problem and difficulty controlling the airplane, but that he had the airplane back to straight and level. The pilot was issued a turn to a heading of 310°, followed by a clearance to climb and maintain 13,000 ft. The pilot was then instructed to contact the Chicago Air Route Traffic Control Center (ZAU). The pilot checked in with ZAU57 sector stating that he was climbing from 10,600 ft to 13,000 ft. The pilot was cleared to climb to FL200 (20,000 ft) followed by a climb to FL230. The pilot was instructed to change frequencies to ZAU46 sector. The pilot then transmitted that he needed a minute to get control of the airplane and that he was having difficulty with the trim. Communication and radar contact was then lost. Several witnesses reported hearing the airplane flying overhead. They all described the airplane as being very loud and that the engine sound was steady up until they heard the impact. The airplane impacted the terrain in a plowed field (upper field) which was soft and muddy. A shallow disruption of the dirt was present which was about 250 ft in length. The impact mark was visible up to the crest of a slight incline where the main pieces of wreckage began. Trees bordered the east end of the field and just beyond the treeline was a tree-covered hill which descended about 50 ft at a slope of about 50°. The trees on the hillside were about 80 to 100 ft tall. At the bottom of the hill was an 8 - 10 ft wide creek. The east bank of the creek was treelined and beyond the trees were to more open fields (lower fields) which were divided by a row of small trees and brush. The wreckage was scattered in the upper field, down the hillside, and into the lower fields. The entire wreckage path was about ¼ mile in length. Recorded weather conditions present 17 miles west of the accident site were overcast at 1,500 ft with 10 miles visibility. The witnesses reported similar conditions in at the accident site.

Crash of a Cessna 525 CitationJet CJ2 in Michigan City

Date & Time: Dec 27, 2017 at 0650 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N525KT
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Chicago-DuPage - Michigan City
MSN:
525-0058
YOM:
2002
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The aircraft impacted an airport fence, highway barrier, and terrain during a landing overrun on runway 20 (4,100 feet by 75 feet, asphalt/dry snow) following an RNAV runway 20 approach at Michigan City Municipal Airport-Phillips Field (MGC), Michigan City, Indiana. The airplane came to rest in a corn field about 300 yards from the departure end of the runway 20. The airplane sustained substantial damage, which included separation of the left wing near the wing root and impact damage to the vertical stabilizer. The pilot and copilot received minor injuries. The airplane was registered to Van E Aviation LLC and operated by Integrated Flight Resources Inc under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a positioning flight and was operating on an instrument flight rules flight plan. The flight originated from DuPage Airport (DPA), West Chicago, Illinois, at 0622 and was destined to MGC for a Part 135 on-demand passenger flight.

Crash of a Beechcraft 100 King Air in Jeffersonville

Date & Time: Oct 30, 2016 at 1235 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N411HA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Jeffersonville – Brunswick
MSN:
B-21
YOM:
1970
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
8
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
13142
Captain / Total hours on type:
34.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
1605
Copilot / Total hours on type:
3
Aircraft flight hours:
12583
Circumstances:
The airline transport pilot, who was the pilot flying, and commercial pilot, who was the pilot not flying and was acting as a safety pilot and was not expected to know the airplane's systems, limitations, or characteristics, were preparing to depart for a personal flight with eight passengers on board. When the pilot arrived at the airport, he determined that the airplane had 900 lbs of fuel onboard. He instructed the lineman to fuel the airplane with 211 gallons of fuel (1,413.7 lbs) for a fuel total of 2,313.7 lbs. The pilot reported that he was aware that the total weight of the eight passengers, their bags, and the fuel caused the airplane to be overweight but that he did not complete a weight and balance form or determine the expected takeoff performance before the flight. He informed the other pilot that the flight would be heavy, but he did not tell him how much the airplane exceeded the airplane's maximum gross takeoff weight. After the accident, the pilot determined that the airplane was 623 lbs over the maximum gross takeoff weight. The pilot reported that the airplane's flight controls and engines were operating normally during the pretakeoff check and that the elevator pitch trim was positioned in the "green" range. The pilot taxied the airplane onto the runway and applied the brakes and increased the throttles to takeoff power before releasing the brakes for the takeoff roll. However, he did not confirm the power settings that he applied when he advanced the throttles. The airplane did not accelerate as quickly as the pilot expected during the takeoff roll. When the airplane was about halfway down the runway, the airspeed was 80 kts, so the pilot continued the takeoff roll, but the airplane was still not accelerating as expected. He stated that he heard the other pilot say "redline," so he decreased the power. At this point, the airplane had reached the last third of the runway, and the pilot pulled back on the control yoke to lift the airplane off the runway, but the stall warning sounded. He lowered the nose, but the airplane was near the end of the runway. He added that he did not get "on" the brakes or put the propellers into reverse pitch and that the airplane then departed the runway. The pilot veered the airplane right to avoid the instrument landing system antenna, which was 500 ft from the end of the 5,500-ft-long runway, but the left wing struck the antenna, the left main landing gear and nose gear collapsed, and both propellers contacted the ground. The airplane then skidded left before stopping about 680 ft from the end of the runway. The pilot reported that the airplane did not have any preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures. The evidence indicates that the pilot decided to depart knowing that the airplane was over its maximum gross takeoff weight and without determining the expected takeoff performance. During the takeoff roll, he did not check his engine instruments to determine if he had applied full takeoff power, although the acceleration may have been sluggish because of the excess weight onboard. The other pilot was not trained on the airplane and was not able to provide the pilot timely performance information during the takeoff. Neither the pilot nor the other pilot called out for an aborted takeoff, and when they recognized the need to abort the takeoff, it was too late to avoid a runway excursion.
Probable cause:
The pilot's inadequate preflight planning, his decision to take off knowing the airplane was over its gross takeoff weight, and his failure to abort the takeoff after he realized that the airplane was not accelerating as expected, which resulted in a runway excursion.
Final Report:

Crash of a Raytheon 390 Premier I in South Bend: 2 killed

Date & Time: Mar 17, 2013 at 1623 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N26DK
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Tulsa - South Bend
MSN:
RB-226
YOM:
2008
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
613
Captain / Total hours on type:
171.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
1877
Copilot / Total hours on type:
0
Aircraft flight hours:
457
Circumstances:
According to the cockpit voice recorder (CVR), during cruise flight, the unqualified pilot-rated passenger was manipulating the aircraft controls, including the engine controls, under the supervision and direction of the private pilot. After receiving a descent clearance to 3,000 feet mean sea level (msl), the pilot told the pilot-rated passenger to reduce engine power to maintain a target airspeed. The cockpit area microphone subsequently recorded the sound of both engines spooling down. The pilot recognized that the pilot-rated passenger had shutdown both engines after he retarded the engine throttles past the flight idle stops into the fuel cutoff position. Specifically, the pilot stated "you went back behind the stops and we lost power." According to air traffic control (ATC) radar track data, at the time of the dual engine shutdown, the airplane was located about 18 miles southwest of the destination airport and was descending through 6,700 feet msl. The pilot reported to the controller that the airplane had experienced a dual loss of engine power, declared an emergency, and requested radar vectors to the destination airport. As the flight approached the destination airport, the cockpit area microphone recorded a sound similar to an engine starter spooling up; however, engine power was not restored during the attempted restart. A review of the remaining CVR audio did not reveal any evidence of another attempt to restart an engine. The CVR stopped recording while the airplane was still airborne, with both engines still inoperative, while on an extended base leg to the runway. Subsequently, the controller told the pilot to go-around because the main landing gear was not extended. The accident airplane was then observed to climb and enter a right traffic pattern to make another landing approach. Witness accounts indicated that only the nose landing gear was extended during the second landing approach. The witnesses observed the airplane bounce several times on the runway before it ultimately entered a climbing right turn. The airplane was then observed to enter a nose low, rolling descent into a nearby residential community. The postaccident examinations and testing did not reveal any anomalies or failures that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane. Although the CVR did not record a successful engine restart, the pilot was able to initiate a go-around during the initial landing attempt, which implies that he was able to restart at least one engine during the initial approach. The investigation subsequently determined that only the left engine was operating at impact. Following an engine start, procedures require that the respective generator be reset to reestablish electrical power to the Essential Bus. If the Essential Bus had been restored, all aircraft systems would have operated normally. However, the battery toggle switch was observed in the Standby position at the accident site, which would have prevented the Essential Bus from receiving power regardless of whether the generator had been reset. As such, the airplane was likely operating on the Standby Bus, which would preclude the normal extension of the landing gear. However, the investigation determined that the landing gear alternate extension handle was partially extended. The observed position of the handle would have precluded the main landing gear from extending (only the nose landing gear would extend). The investigation determined that it is likely the pilot did not fully extend the handle to obtain a full landing gear deployment. Had he fully extended the landing gear, a successful single-engine landing could have been accomplished. In conclusion, the private pilot's decision to allow the unqualified pilot-rated passenger to manipulate the airplane controls directly resulted in the inadvertent dual engine shutdown during cruise descent. Additionally, the pilot's inadequate response to the emergency, including his failure to adhere to procedures, resulted in his inability to fully restore airplane systems and ultimately resulted in a loss of airplane control.
Probable cause:
The private pilot's inadequate response to the dual engine shutdown during cruise descent, including his failure to adhere to procedures, which ultimately resulted in his failure to
maintain airplane control during a single-engine go-around. An additional cause was the pilot's decision to allow the unqualified pilot-rated passenger to manipulate the airplane controls, which directly resulted in the inadvertent dual engine shutdown.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-46-350P Malibu Mirage in Greensburg: 4 killed

Date & Time: Dec 2, 2012 at 1816 LT
Registration:
N92315
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Destin – Greensburg
MSN:
46-22135
YOM:
1993
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
398
Captain / Total hours on type:
52.00
Aircraft flight hours:
1612
Circumstances:
The instrument-rated private pilot was executing a non precision instrument approach procedure at night in deteriorating weather conditions. According to GPS track data, the pilot executed the approach as published but descended below the missed approach point's minimum altitude before executing a climbing right turn. This turn was not consistent with the published missed approach procedure. The airplane then began a series of left and right ascending and descending turns to various altitudes. The last few seconds of recorded data indicated that the airplane entered a descending left turn. Two witnesses heard the airplane fly overhead at a low altitude and described the weather as foggy. Reported weather at a nearby airport about 26 minutes before the accident was visibility less than 2 miles in mist and an overcast ceiling of 300 feet. A friend of the pilot flew the same route in a similarly equipped airplane and arrived about 30 minutes before the accident airplane. He said he performed the same approach to the missed approach point but never broke out of the clouds, so he executed a missed approach and diverted to an alternate airport. A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. Federal Aviation Administration Flight Training Handbook Advisory Circular 61-21A cautions that pilots are particularly vulnerable to spatial disorientation during periods of low visibility due to conflicts between what they see and what their supporting senses, such as the inner ear and muscle sense, communicate. The accident airplane's maneuvering flightpath, as recorded by the GPS track data, in night instrument meteorological conditions is consistent with the pilot's loss of airplane control due to spatial disorientation.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain airplane control while maneuvering in night instrument meteorological conditions due to spatial disorientation.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 421C Golden III Eagle in Connersville: 1 killed

Date & Time: Feb 23, 2011 at 2002 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N3875C
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Indianapolis - Connersville
MSN:
421C-0127
YOM:
1976
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
1360
Captain / Total hours on type:
558.00
Aircraft flight hours:
4158
Circumstances:
A witness reported that, despite the darkness, he was able to see the navigation lights on the airplane as it flew over the south end of the airport at an altitude of 150 to 200 feet above the ground. The airplane made a left turn to the downwind leg of the traffic pattern and continued a descending turn until the airplane impacted the ground in a near-vertical attitude. Due to the airplane’s turn, the 10- to 20-knot quartering headwind became a quartering tailwind. The airplane was also turned toward a rural area with very little ground lighting. A postaccident examination of the airplane and engines did not reveal any preimpact anomalies that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane.
Probable cause:
The pilot did not maintain control of the airplane while making a low-altitude turn during dark night conditions.
Final Report: