code

FL

Crash of a Gulfstream GIV in Fort Lauderdale

Date & Time: Aug 21, 2021 at 1325 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N277GM
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
1124
YOM:
1989
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
11
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
During the takeoff roll from Fort Lauderdale-Executive Airport, the crew encountered an unexpected situation. Control was lost and the aircraft veered off runway, lost its nose gear and came to rest in a grassy area with both main landing gear collapsed. All 14 occupants, among them the American boxer Gervonta Davis, were rescued. One passenger was slightly injured but did not request any assistance.

Crash of a Piper PA-60 Aerostar (Ted Smith 600) in LaBelle: 1 killed

Date & Time: May 6, 2021 at 1520 LT
Registration:
C-FAAZ
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
MSN:
60-0148-065
YOM:
1973
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
Few minutes after takeoff from LaBelle Airport, the twin engine airplane crashed into trees located in a church garden located less than 2 km east of the airport. Apparently, the passenger survived while the pilot was killed. Engine failure was reported by the survivor.

Crash of a Piper PA-46-310P Malibu off Naples

Date & Time: Dec 19, 2020 at 1220 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N662TC
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Sarasota - Key West
MSN:
46-8508095
YOM:
1985
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The single engine airplane departed Sarasota-Bradenton Airport at 1140LT and continued to the south heading 178° at an altitude of 6,725 feet. While flying along the coast, the pilot encountered an unexpected situation and apparently decided to divert to Naples Airport. Eventually, he ditched the aircraft near the Naples' Pier and the aircraft came to rest less than 500 metres offshore. Both occupants were slightly injured while the aircraft later sank.

Crash of a Cessna 414 Chancellor in North Palm Beach

Date & Time: Oct 8, 2020 at 1115 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N8132Q
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
North Palm Beach - Claxton
MSN:
414-0032
YOM:
1969
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
While taking off from runway 14 at North Palm Beach County Airport, the twin engine aircraft went out of control and crashed in a pond. All seven occupants were injured, some seriously. The aircraft was destroyed.

Crash of a Rockwell 500S Shrike Commander in Pembroke Park: 2 killed

Date & Time: Aug 28, 2020 at 0900 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N900DT
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Pompano Beach – North Perry
MSN:
500-3056
YOM:
1969
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
While descending to North Perry Airport on a flight from Pompano Beach, the twin engine aircraft struck the facade of a public storage facility building and crashed in a parking lot located in an industrial estate in Pembroke Park. The aircraft was destroyed and both occupants were killed.

Crash of a Cessna 421A Golden Eagle I in DeLand: 3 killed

Date & Time: Sep 29, 2019 at 1600 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N731PF
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
MSN:
421A-0164
YOM:
1968
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
The twin engine airplane crashed in unknown circumstances in a wooded area located about 4 miles southwest of DeLand Municipal Airport, near Grand Avenue and Old New York Avenue. The aircraft was destroyed by a post crash fire and all three occupants were killed.

Crash of a Boeing 737-81Q at Jacksonville NAS

Date & Time: May 3, 2019 at 2142 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N732MA
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Guantánamo Bay - Jacksonville
MSN:
30618/830
YOM:
2001
Flight number:
LL293
Crew on board:
7
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
136
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Aircraft flight hours:
38928
Aircraft flight cycles:
15610
Circumstances:
Following an uneventful flight from Leeward Point Field, Guantánamo Bay, the crew started the descent to Jacksonville-Towers Field NAS by night and stormy weather. The flight crew originally planned to land on runway 28 (9,000 feet long) but later decided to land on runway 10. The airplane touched down 1,600 feet past the runway 10 threshold at a speed of 163 knots and with a 15 knots tailwind. Ground spoilers were deployed three seconds after touchdown while the thrust reversers were not activated as the right reverser was inoperative, in respect to the Minimum Equipment List (MEL). Unable to stop within the remaining distance, the airplane overran, slightly deviated to the right then rolled in a grassy area and eventually passed over an embankment and came to rest in the St Johns River. All 143 occupants were evacuated, 21 of them with minor injuries.

Crash of a Convair C-131B Samaritan off Miami: 1 killed

Date & Time: Feb 8, 2019 at 1215 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N145GT
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Nassau - Miami
MSN:
256
YOM:
1955
Flight number:
QAI504
Location:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
23000
Captain / Total hours on type:
725.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
650
Copilot / Total hours on type:
305
Circumstances:
The airplane departed Nassau-Lynden Pindling Airport at 1113LT back to Opa Locka in Miami after delivering various goods. At 1203LT, while cruising at an altitude of 4,300 feet in good weather conditions, the crew declared an emergency and informed ATC about a double engine failure. The crew elected to ditch the aircraft that crashed into the sea 12 minutes later about 13 miles east of the Bay Harbor Islands. Coast Guards were quickly dispatched on the scene and the copilot aged 28 was able to climb by himself in the rescue basket and to be airlifted to hospital. Unfortunately, the captain aged 68 died. On Feb 22nd 2019 the NTSB released a preliminary report stating the crew had departed Opa Locka for Nassau with 900 gallons of fuel on board but experienced trouble with the left hand propeller control enroute to Nassau when the propeller became stuck at 2,400 rpm. The crew was unable to reset the propeller control. A message sent to maintenance did not transmit. The captain decided that they wouldn't start up for the return flight, if the propeller control had not reset they'd shut down again and wait for maintenance. Both engines and propellers came up normally however and they departed for Opa Locka. Climbing through 4,000 feet the left hand propeller became again stuck at 2,400 rpm. The captain managed to bump the propeller up to 2,700 rpm, equalized power on both engines, levelled off at 4,500 feet, cancelled the IFR flight plan and continued visually to Opa Locka. The flight was uneventful until they began the descent to 1,500 feet. At that point the right hand engine "backfired" and surged. The crew shut the engine down. A short time later the left hand engine also backfired and surged. The captain continued flying the aircraft while the first officer worked the related checklists, however, when they were getting too low and it became clear they had to ditch the captain instructed to declare Mayday and brace for impact.

Crash of a Piper PA-46-350P Malibu off Mayport: 2 killed

Date & Time: Dec 20, 2018 at 0904 LT
Registration:
N307JM
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Kissimmee - Princeton
MSN:
46-36253
YOM:
2000
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The aircraft impacted the Atlantic Ocean near Mayport, Florida. The private pilot and pilot-rated passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed. The airplane was privately owned and operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and the flight was operating on an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan. The personal flight originated from Kissimmee Gateway Airport, Orlando, Florida, about 0821, and was destined for Princeton Airport, Princeton/Rocky Hill, NJ. According to preliminary air traffic control radar and voice data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), at 0859:02, one of the airplane's occupants contacted the Jacksonville Air Route Traffic Control Center (ZJX ARTCC) R-73 sector controller and reported passing through Flight Level (FL) 220 for FL230. The controller advised the pilot there were moderate and some heavy precipitation along the route of flight extending for 200 nautical miles. The occupant acknowledged the controller and advised they would be watching the weather. FAA radar data indicated at 0900:22 the flight reached FL227. Preliminary review of weather data revealed that this altitude was above the freezing level, and at that time the flight entered an area of weather radar returns with intensities between 10 to 30 dBZ (which equated to light to moderate precipitation). While in the weather radar-indicated precipitation, the flight climbed to FL230. At 0902:14, while at the edge of the precipitation, the airplane started a slight left turn before entering a right turn at 0902:28 at FL226. The turn had not been directed by the controller or announced by either occupant. Between 0902:28 and 0903:10, the airplane descended from FL226 to FL202. At 0903:10, the airplane was descending through FL202 when the controller attempted to contact the flight, but there was no reply. The controller attempted to communicate with the flight several more times, and at 0903:27 in response to one attempt, while at 14,500 feet mean sea level (msl), an occupant advised, "were not ok we need help." The controller asked the pilot if he was declaring an emergency and "whats going on." At 0903:35, while at 12,600 feet msl an occupant stated, "I'm not sure whats happening", followed by, "I have anti-ice and everything." At 0903:40 the controller asked the flight if it could maintain altitude, an occupant responded that they could not maintain altitude. The controller provided vectors to a nearby airport west of their position, but the flight did not reply to that transmission or a subsequent query. At about 0904:32 (which was the last communication from the airplane), while at 3,300 feet msl, an occupant advised the controller that the airplane was inverted and asked for assistance. The last radar recorded position with altitude read-out of the flight was at 0904:40, at an altitude of 1,700 feet msl, and 30.40069° north latitude and -81.3844° west longitude. The U.S. Coast Guard initiated a search for the missing airplane, but the wreckage was not located and the search was suspended on December 22, 2018. A privately-funded search for the airplane was initiated and the wreckage was located and recovered on February 6, 2019. The recovered wreckage was retained for further investigation.

Crash of a Beechcraft 60 Duke in Destin: 4 killed

Date & Time: Aug 30, 2018 at 1030 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N1876L
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Toledo - Destin
MSN:
P-386
YOM:
1976
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
The aircraft impacted terrain during an approach to the Destin Executive Airport (DTS), Destin, Florida, Texas. The commercial rated pilot and three passengers were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by Henry Leasing Company, LLC, as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 cross-country fight. The flight departed the Toledo Executive airport (TOL) about 0747 en route to DTS, and an instrument flight plan had been filed. A preliminary review of air traffic control (ATC) communications revealed that as the flight approached the destination airport, the pilot was in contact with the Eglin AFB approach controller, reported DTS in sight, and then canceled his IFR clearance. The pilot was then handed over to the DTS tower controller, where the pilot reported that he was about 2 miles north of DTS. There were no further communications between the pilot and air traffic control. The airplane wreckage was located in a remote, wooded area of the Eglin AFB reservation property, about 8.5 miles northwest of the DTS airport and 2.5 miles northwest of the Eglin AFB. The airplane impacted trees, on a 067-degree heading with a wreckage path about 380 feet long. Several fragments of the airplane were located along the wreckage path: the airplane's nose cone was located near the initial impact point, the left-wing tip fuel tank and right outboard wing was near the beginning of the path, and the right horizontal stabilizer and elevator were fragmented and located on the wreckage path. The airplane came to rest inverted, with a post-crash fire consuming most of the cabin and inboard section of the wings. Both engines had impact and fire damage; with the right engine located just right of the main wreckage. The left engine was located in front of the main wreckage. Both 3-bladed propellers had broken from and was next to their respective engines.