code

FL

Crash of an Antonov AN-2 in the Everglades National Park

Date & Time: Nov 14, 2022 at 1330 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
CU-A1885
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The single engine airplane landed last October at Dade-Collier Airport, in the center of the Everglades National Park, following a flight from Sancti Spíritus, Cuba. The pilot defected Cuba and landed safely in the US. On November 14, in unclear circumstances, maybe while being transferred to Opa Locka Airport, the airplane crashed in a marshy area located 25 km west of Opa Locka Airport. Both occupants were uninjured and the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Cirrus Vision SF50 in Kissimmee

Date & Time: Sep 9, 2022 at 1502 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N77VJ
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Miami - Kissimmee
MSN:
88
YOM:
2018
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On approach to Kissimmee-Gateway Airport in marginal weather conditions, the pilot lost control of the airplane that crashed in a marshy and wooded area located about 10 km short of runway 33. All three occupants were injured, one seriously.
Probable cause:
An initial statement reports that the airplane crashed following the deployment of the Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS).

Crash of a McDonnell Douglas MD-82 in Miami

Date & Time: Jun 21, 2022 at 1738 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
HI1064
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Santo Domingo - Miami
MSN:
53027/1805
YOM:
1990
Flight number:
L5203
Crew on board:
7
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
119
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Following an uneventful flight from Santo Domingo-Las Américas Airport, the crew was cleared to land on runway 09 at Miami-Intl Airport. According to a video, it is believed that both main landing gear were not properly extended upon touchdown. The airplane rolled for few hundred metres then deviated to the left and departed the runway to the left. It collided with obstacles, lost its undercarriage and came to rest in a grassy area, bursting into flames. Fire was quickly extinguished. All 126 occupants evacuated safely, among them three passengers were taken to Jackson Hospital.

Crash of a Cessna 207 Skywagon off Marathon

Date & Time: Dec 29, 2021 at 1622 LT
Registration:
N1596U
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Marathon - Naples
MSN:
207-0196
YOM:
1971
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On December 29, 2021, at 1622 eastern standard time, a Cessna 207 airplane, N1596U, sustained minor damage when it was involved in an accident in the Florida Bay near Marathon, Florida. The pilot sustained serious injuries and the two passengers sustained minor injuries. The airplane was operated by ExecAir of Naples as an on-demand passenger flight under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135. According to the operator, the pilot reported that the takeoff from The Florida Keys Marathon International Airport (MTH), Marathon, Florida was normal, and the flight progressed oncourse over water toward the destination of Naples Municipal Airport (APF), Naples, Florida. Once the airplane reached about 3,500 ft mean sea level, a “bang” from the engine was heard, which was immediately followed by a total loss of engine power and oil spraying onto the cowling. The pilot briefed the passengers that they would not be able to make it to land and to prepare for a water landing. Subsequently, the ditching was accomplished in open water, the airplane remained upright, and everyone evacuated the airplane. About 10-15 minutes later, a passing pleasure vessel rescued the occupants and a United States Coast Guard helicopter also arrived shortly thereafter. Review of photographs of the airplane after it was recovered to land revealed that it sustained minor damage to areas of the cowling, fuselage, and wings. Photos of the engine (Continental Motors, IO-520-F) revealed that a large fracture hole was sustained to the crankcase near the No. 2 cylinder, with several internal engine components protruding from the area. The magnetos were also observed to have fractured from their attach points and were resting on top of the engine. The propeller was intact and showed minimal damage.

Crash of a Gulfstream GIV in Fort Lauderdale

Date & Time: Aug 21, 2021 at 1340 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N277GM
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
1124
YOM:
1989
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
11
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On August 21, 2021, about 1340 eastern daylight time, a Gulfstream Aerospace G-IV airplane, N277GM, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident at the Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport (FXE), Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The four crew members and 10 passengers were not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. The pilot-in-command (PIC) reported that after a routine taxi to the runway he initiated the takeoff on runway 9. As the takeoff roll progressed, he recalled that the normal callouts were made, and nothing was abnormal until the airplane reached about 100 to 110 knots, at which point he felt a “terrible shimmy” that “progressively got worse and worse.” He initiated an immediate aborted takeoff with braking and thrust reversers and it seemed that the airplane was slowing; however, the airplane veered off the runway and the right main landing gear struck a concrete slab holding approach lighting equipment. The airplane came to a stop shortly after impacting the concrete slab. The second-in-command pilot reported that the taxi and initial takeoff roll were normal. As the airplane passed through 80 knots, he recalled feeling a “slight shimmy” and “a little rattle” between the rudder pedals, which “intensified dramatically.” The PIC then aborted the takeoff by reducing the power to idle, applying thrust reversers, and applying brakes. During the abort procedure, the nose dropped, and it became apparent that “the nose gear collapsed.” The airplane continued to maintain the runway centerline for a short period of time but then veered to the right, off the runway and came to a stop. He then opened the main cabin door, and the passengers immediately exited. A third non-type rated observer pilot seated in the jumpseat reported a similar account of the accident sequence. A Federal Aviation Administration inspector responded to the accident site the day of the accident. The airplane came to rest in a sandy grass area about 200 ft to the right of the runway 9 centerline. The left main landing gear did not collapse; however, the right main landing gear was displaced upward and punctured the inboard aft section of the right wing which resulted in substantial damage. Examination of the runway and surrounding grass areas found several items of debris. Moving east in the direction of the takeoff roll, the first component located on the runway was the nose landing gear (NLG) pip pin that is normally seated in the NLG torque link. It was found about 2,215 ft from the main wreckage. Continuing down the runway, about 1,315 ft from the main wreckage, the bulk of the NLG shock strut assembly, trunnion and truss, both tires, and lower scissor link were located intact and impact damaged. The safety pin, that normally is installed through the NLG pip pin was found intact with the separated NLG still attached to its lanyard cord. The NLG upper scissor link was located in the grass a few hundred feet from the runway centerline. Figure 1 shows a still image captured by the FXE Airport Authority drone shortly after the accident. Additional photographs have been added to the drone image to show the location of swivel tire marks and where components were located on the runway as noted with the red circles.

Crash of a Piper PA-60 Aerostar (Ted Smith 600) in LaBelle: 1 killed

Date & Time: May 6, 2021 at 1520 LT
Registration:
C-FAAZ
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
MSN:
60-0148-065
YOM:
1973
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
Few minutes after takeoff from LaBelle Airport, the twin engine airplane crashed into trees located in a church garden located less than 2 km east of the airport. Apparently, the passenger survived while the pilot was killed. Engine failure was reported by the survivor.

Crash of a Piper PA-46-310P Malibu off Naples

Date & Time: Dec 19, 2020 at 1216 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N662TC
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Sarasota - Key West
MSN:
46-8508095
YOM:
1985
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On December 19, 2020, about 1216 eastern standard time, a piper PA-46-310 airplane; N662TC, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Naples, Florida. The pilot and passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. The flight originated at Sarasota / Bradenton international Airport (SRQ), Sarasota, Florida destined for Key West International Airport (EYW), Key West, Florida. According to the pilot, on the morning of the day of the accident, the pilot and his passenger went to SRQ. The pilot filed an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan for the flight to EYW, and had the airplane towed to the fixed base operator’s ramp, then conducted a preflight including draining both tanks to check for water. No water was visible, and both fuel tanks contained about 50 gallons each (100 gallons total). The fuel selector was on the right tank, and the engine started without any delay. The pilot then received his IFR clearance and took off at 1139. After takeoff the pilot was cleared by air traffic control to climb to 7,000 feet above mean sea level (msl) and the flight continued until it was near Southwest Florida International Airport (RSW), Fort Myers, Florida and then was cleared direct to EYW. Until this point, the engine was running smooth and was leaned to 50° lean of peak. About 1213, the pilot switched the fuel selector to the left fuel tank. Immediately after switching fuel tanks, the engine started to sputter and lost power. The pilot switched back to the right fuel tank but there was no change. He then tried different power settings, Set the mixture to full rich, and switched tanks again without result. The pilot then advised ATC that he was having an engine problem and needed to land at the nearest airport. ATC then had him contact the control tower at Naples municipal Airport (APF), Naples, Florida. APF tower then cleared him to land on runway 5 but, the pilot realized that he was already well below 5,000 feet msl, so he advised the tower that he could not make it to the airport and that he was heading for the beach and would land in the water. The pilot now focused on his attitude, the best glide, and airspeed and touched down on the water. The airplane came to a sudden stop and was floating. Apart from the propeller, he could see no visible damage. He then unlatched his seatbelt and opened the upper part of the airstair door and egressed. He then helped his passenger to egress and they both started swimming towards the beach. The airplane continued to float. The pilot saw a helicopter circling overhead, and then after 10 to 15 minutes of swimming they were picked up by a boat. They were later transported to the hospital. The airplane eventually sank and came to rest in 6 feet of water. It was later recovered, and cursory examination by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector, revealed that the propeller, wings, and aft fuselage, had been substantially damaged.

Crash of a Cessna 414 Chancellor in North Palm Beach

Date & Time: Oct 8, 2020 at 1115 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N8132Q
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
North Palm Beach - Claxton
MSN:
414-0032
YOM:
1969
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On October 8, 2020, about 1115 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 414, N8132Q, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident at North Palm Beach County General Aviation Airport (F45), West Palm Beach, Florida. The private pilot and six passengers sustained serious injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. According to the pilot’s son, a multiengine airplane rated passenger who was seated in the front right seat, his father was flying family members to Claxton-Evans County Airport, Claxton, Georgia, where they planned a fuel stop before proceeding to their home-base of Columbus Municipal Airport, Columbus, Indiana. After the preflight inspection, engine start and taxi, he noted no irregularities when his father performed the engine run-up. His father then taxied onto the runway, checked the trim for takeoff, applied brakes, and advanced the throttles to full power. Once at full rpm, his father released the brakes and the airplane began its takeoff roll. Shortly into the takeoff roll, he felt a momentary “slight shudder” which appeared to come from the controls. As the airplane continued down the runway, he looked out of the window and thought that they should have rotated. He observed that the airspeed indicator showed about 10 to 15 knots past “blueline;” however, the airplane remained on the runway and continued to gain speed. The airplane was running out of runway, and the pilot’s son attempted to pull back on the control yoke; however, the controls would not move, so he pulled the throttles back to idle and applied maximum braking; he estimated that the airplane’s indicated airspeed was between 120 and 130 knots when the aborted takeoff was initiated. The airplane departed the paved portion of the runway, travelled through the grass and impacted a dirt mound before coming to rest in a marsh. A witness who observed the takeoff stated, “They were going fast enough to fly, but they weren’t coming up off the ground.” He further stated said the engines never lost power until the pilot shut them off in an attempt to stop. Initial examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that it came to rest upright and submerged in about 5 ft of water about 450 ft beyond the departure end of runway 14. The fuselage and cabin area remained relatively intact. The right wing and engine were separated. The right elevator was bent upwards nearly vertical with the vertical stabilizer; the left elevator separated. The left wing and engine remained attached in their respective locations, with the outboard portion of the left wing sheared at the wing tip fuel tank.

Crash of a Rockwell 500S Shrike Commander in Pembroke Park: 2 killed

Date & Time: Aug 28, 2020 at 0902 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N900DT
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Pompano Beach – North Perry
MSN:
500-3056
YOM:
1969
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
On August 28, 2020, about 0902 eastern daylight time, an Aero Commander Aircraft 500-S, N900DT, was destroyed when it impacted a building near Pembroke Park, Florida. The commercial pilot and pilot-rated passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 business flight. According to preliminary Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) ADS-B and audio information, after takeoff from Pompano Beach Airpark about 0852, the flight proceeded in a southeast direction to the shore, then flew in a south-southwest direction just offshore. About 0858, when the flight was about 13 nautical miles northeast from Miami-Opa Locka Executive Airport (OPF), which was the destination, an occupant onboard the airplane contacted the OPF air traffic control tower (ATCT) and advised the controller that the flight was inbound. The flight was radar identified and continued in a south-southwest direction while climbing to 1,100 ft mean sea level (msl). At about 0859:49, or 1 minute 49 seconds after the initial contact with the OPF ATCT, an occupant advised the controller, "and uh november delta tango ah we have uh an engine problem, we [are going] to North Perry [Airport]." The OPF ATCT initially coordinated with Miami Approach and advised the facility that the flight was descending, with a last reported altitude of 300 ft. The controller then attempted to coordinate with North Perry ATCT. About 0859:53, the airplane turned to a southwest direction, climbed to about 1250 ft msl. About that time a witness who was located about 2.8 nautical miles east-southeast of the flightpath when the airplane was flying in the southwest direction reported hearing the engines accelerating and decelerating which changed to a popping sound. The airplane continued flying and went out of his earshot. The ADS-B data reflected that about 0900:47, the airplane turned and flew in a west-northwesterly direction until about 0901:58, when the flight proceeded in a north-northwest direction until near the accident site. Witnesses who were on a golf course north of the accident site reported seeing the airplane flying in a westerly direction with no reported engine sound. They then noted the airplane banked left and then descended. The airplane collided with the east face of a storage building in a densely populated area, then fell to the parking lot of the building. There were no reported ground injuries. Preliminary examination of the accident site revealed an impact mark on the building which reflected the airplane being in a right bank. Examination of the wreckage revealed no evidence of pre or postimpact fire.

Crash of a Cessna 510 Citation Mustang in Daytona Beach

Date & Time: Feb 20, 2020 at 1245 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N163TC
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Daytona Beach - Daytona Beach
MSN:
510-0039
YOM:
2007
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2533
Captain / Total hours on type:
90.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
7500
Aircraft flight hours:
2380
Circumstances:
The pilot was receiving a checkride from a designated pilot examiner for his single-pilot type rating in a turbine airplane. After a series of maneuvers, emergencies, and landings, the examiner asked the pilot to complete a no-flap landing. The pilot reported that he performed the Before Landing checklist with no flaps and believed that he had put the gear down. During touchdown, the pilot felt a "thump" and thought a tire had blown; however, he saw that the landing gear handle was in the "up" position, and he noted that the landing gear warning horn did not sound because he had performed a no-flaps landing. The examiner confirmed that the landing gear handle was in the "up" position. The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. A Federal Aviation Administration inspector who examined the airplane reported that the landing gear handle was in the "up" position and that the fuselage had sustained substantial damage. The landing gear was lowered and locked into place without issue after the airplane was lifted from the runway.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to lower the landing gear before landing. Contributing to the accident was the examiner's failure to check that the landing gear was extended.
Final Report: