Crash of a Swearingen SA226TC Metro II in Denver

Date & Time: May 12, 2021 at 1023 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N280KL
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Salida – Denver
MSN:
TC-280
YOM:
1978
Flight number:
LYM970
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On May 12, 2021, at 1023 mountain daylight time, a Cirrus SR22, N416DJ, and a Swearingen SA226TC, N280KL, collided in flight while approaching to land at Centennial Airport (APA), Englewood, Colorado. There were no injuries on either airplane. N416DJ was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight, and N280KL was operated as a Title 14 CFR Part 91 positioning flight. N416DJ departed APA for a local flight about 0921, and N280KL departed the Salida Airport (ANK), Salida, Colorado, about 0956. A review of preliminary air traffic control (ATC) communications and Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that, N416DJ was performing a right-hand traffic pattern for runway 17R at APA, and N280KL was on final approach for runway 17L at APA, when the collision occurred. Both airplanes were in communication with air traffic control during their respective approaches to the airport. About 1022:43, N280KL was about 5.5 nm from APA and had completed a right turn to align with the final approach course to runway 17L. At this same time, N416DJ was on the downwind leg of the righthand traffic pattern for runway 17R just before he commenced a right turn to the base leg of the traffic pattern. N280KL continued its approach and remained aligned with runway 17L. N416DJ continued the right-hand traffic pattern through the base leg, and then began to turn toward the final approach course for the runway as depicted in Figure 1. The airplanes collided at 1023:53 when they were about 3.2 nm from APA. N280KL was aligned with runway 17L while N416DJ was turning from base to final and heading about 146° when the collision occurred. After the impact, N280KL declared an emergency, continued to APA, and landed successfully on runway 17L without further incident. The pilot of N416DL reported that the airplane was not controllable after the impact and he deployed the Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS). N416DJ came to rest about 3 nm north of APA.

Crash of a Swearingen SA226TC Metro II in Querétaro: 5 killed

Date & Time: Jun 2, 2015 at 1425 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
XA-UKP
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Santiago de Querétaro - Santiago de Querétaro
MSN:
TC-376
YOM:
1980
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
19172
Captain / Total hours on type:
3731.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
364
Copilot / Total hours on type:
117
Aircraft flight hours:
26985
Aircraft flight cycles:
37207
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft was engaged in a post-maintenance test flight out from Santiago de Querétaro Airport, carrying three engineers and two pilots. It departed runway 09 at 1421LT and the crew was cleared to climb to FL125. While approaching the altitude of 12,000 feet, the aircraft entered an uncontrolled descent and crashed on a motorway located 11 km southwest of the airport, bursting into flames. The aircraft was totally destroyed by impact forces and a post crash fire and all five occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Loss of control of the aircraft in flight for undetermined reasons. No mechanical failure was found on the aircraft and its components that could affect the normal operation of the airplane.
The following findings were identified:
- Lack of coordination and effective communication between ground staff and flight crew,
- Lack of adequate supervision of operations by the operator,
- Lack of a safety culture of the operator.
Final Report:

Crash of a Swearingen SA226TC Metro II on Mt Seymour: 2 killed

Date & Time: Apr 13, 2015 at 0708 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-GSKC
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Vancouver – Prince George – Dawson Creek – Fort Saint John
MSN:
TC-235
YOM:
1977
Flight number:
CA066
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
2885
Captain / Total hours on type:
1890.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
1430
Copilot / Total hours on type:
57
Aircraft flight hours:
33244
Circumstances:
On 13 April 2015, Carson Air Ltd. flight 66 (CA66), a Swearingen SA226-TC Metro II (registration C-GSKC, serial number TC-235), departed Vancouver International Airport (CYVR), British Columbia, with 2 pilots on board for an instrument flight rules flight to Prince George, British Columbia. At 0709 Pacific Daylight Time (PDT), approximately 6 minutes after leaving Vancouver, the aircraft disappeared from air traffic control radar while climbing through an altitude of 8700 feet above sea level in instrument meteorological conditions, about 4 nautical miles north of the built-up area of North Vancouver. Deteriorating weather conditions with low cloud and heavy snowfall hampered an air search; however, aircraft wreckage was found on steep, mountainous, snow-covered terrain by ground searchers at approximately 1645 PDT. The aircraft had experienced a catastrophic in-flight breakup. Both pilots were fatally injured, and the aircraft was destroyed. Although the aircraft’s 406-megahertz emergency locator transmitter activated, the antenna was damaged and no signal was received by the Cospas-Sarsat (international satellite system for search and rescue). The accident occurred during daylight hours.
Probable cause:
Findings as to causes and contributing factors:
1. For unknown reasons, the aircraft descended in the direction of flight at high speed until it exceeded its structural limits, leading to an in-flight breakup.
2. Based on the captain’s blood alcohol content, alcohol intoxication almost certainly played a role in the events leading up to the accident.

Findings as to risk:
1. If cockpit or data recordings are not available to an investigation, the identification and communication of safety deficiencies to advance transportation safety may be precluded.
2. If Canadian Aviation Regulations Subpart 703 operators are not required to have a Transport Canada–approved safety management system, which is assessed on a regular basis, there is a risk that those companies will not have the necessary processes in place to manage safety effectively.
3. If safety issues, such as concerns related to drug or alcohol abuse, are not reported formally through a company’s safety reporting system, there is a risk that hazards will not be managed effectively.
4. Transport Canada’s Handbook for Civil Aviation Medical Examiners(TP 13312) does not address the complete range of conditions that may be affected by drug or alcohol dependence. As a result, there is an increased risk that undisclosed cases of drug or alcohol dependence in commercial aviation will go undetected, placing the travelling public at risk.
5. If there is no regulated drug- and alcohol-testing requirement in place to reduce the risk of impairment of persons while engaged in safety-sensitive functions, employees may undertake these duties while impaired, posing a risk to public safety.
Final Report:

Crash of a Swearingen SA226TC Metro II in Lanseria

Date & Time: Jun 13, 2010 at 1100 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
ZS-ZOC
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Lanseria – Polokwane
MSN:
TC-293
YOM:
1979
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
13
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
6900
Captain / Total hours on type:
400.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
1630
Copilot / Total hours on type:
35
Aircraft flight hours:
27532
Aircraft flight cycles:
27353
Circumstances:
Two flight crew members accompanied by thirteen passengers departed from FALA to FAPP. The flight was uneventful until during the approach to land on Runway 05 at FAPP. The flight crew selected landing gear down and observed a red light which indicate undercarriage unsafe. The flight crew reported the situation to FAPP Air Traffic Control (ATC). FAPP ATC gave instruction to do a missed approach at low level fly-past. The intention was to conduct a visual inspection of the undercarriage to determine its condition. The ATC observed that the left main gear had not extended. FAPP ATC gave an instruction to the flight crew, to hold over the beacon (BHV), where they could attempt to extend the gear by means of normal and emergency procedure. The flight crew was not successful and undercarriage remained retracted. The flight crew returned to FALA with the intention to carry out an emergency landing. FALA ATC give instructions to the flight crew to hold over the beacon (LIV), to again attempt the normal and emergency undercarriage extension procedures. But jet again; the flight crew was unsuccessful to lower the left main gear. ATC then instructed that the aircraft should execute the emergency landing on Runway 24R. During short finals overhead the threshold, prior to touchdown, the flight crew shut down both engines, feathered the propellers and switched off all the electronics. The aircraft landed and came to a gradual stop on its lower fuselage on the centreline of the runway.
Probable cause:
The pilot executed a belly “wheels up” emergency landing after the left main landing gear failed to extend.
Contributory Factors:
The new tyres installed on the main landing gear wheels were not in compliance with the instructions of the Fairchild Service Letter 226-SN-131.
Final Report:

Crash of a Swearingen SA226AC Metro II in Norway House

Date & Time: Nov 8, 2006 at 0834 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FTNV
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Winnipeg – Norway House
MSN:
TC-239E
YOM:
1977
Flight number:
PAG105
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
6000
Captain / Total hours on type:
4500.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
4000
Copilot / Total hours on type:
15
Circumstances:
The aircraft was on a flight from Winnipeg, Manitoba, to Norway House, Manitoba, with two crew members and seven passengers on board. After touchdown on Runway 05, when propeller reverse was selected, the aircraft veered to the left. The crew attempted to regain directional control; however, the aircraft departed the left side of the runway surface, entered an area of loose snow, traversed a shallow ditch, climbed a rocky embankment, and came to rest on its belly with all three landing gears collapsed. The crew and passengers exited the aircraft through the main door stairway and the over-wing exits. There were no reported injuries. The accident occurred during daylight hours at 0834 central standard time.
Probable cause:
Findings as to Causes and Contributing Factors:
1. The left engine fuel control support assembly failed in fatigue and released one of three attachment bolts, which resulted in a slight displacement of the fuel control and changed the propeller control dimension. As a result, Beta pressure was achieved and propeller reverse was available for the left engine before it was available for the right engine.
2. The pilot selected thrust reverse without confirmation that the Beta lights were on for both engines, and the aircraft veered from the runway, most likely as a result of temporary asymmetric thrust.
Finding as to Risk:
1. There is no requirement to include the Beta light call as part of the pre-landing briefing. Briefing this item would remind the pilots of the need to confirm Beta light activation for both engines before application of thrust reverse.
Final Report:

Crash of a Swearingen SA226TC Metro II in Paris: 1 killed

Date & Time: Feb 8, 2006 at 1210 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N629EK
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Dayton - Harlingen
MSN:
TC-396
YOM:
1980
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
5237
Captain / Total hours on type:
164.00
Aircraft flight hours:
15883
Circumstances:
While in cruise flight at 16,000 feet, the pilot requested from ATC and was cleared to make a 360-degree turn to the left. Shortly after this, the pilot requested a 360-degree turn to the right. The pilot then requested radar vectors to the closest airport and was given this. ATC asked the pilot if he had an emergency and the pilot reported he had an asymmetric fuel condition. The pilot then asked for a lower altitude and was cleared by ATC to 4,000 feet. About a minute later the pilot transmitted "Mayday" six times and shortly after this radar and radio contact with the flight was lost. Recorded radar data showed that at 1803:13 the accident airplane was proceeding on a southerly heading at 16,100 feet mean sea level (MSL). At 1803:53 the airplane turned left to a southeasterly heading. At 1804:13 the airplane turned right returning to its original southerly heading. At 1805:14 the accident airplane turned to the right on a southwesterly heading, and maintained that heading until 1809:04 at which time the airplane turned due west and was at an altitude of 15,400 feet. The last radar contact was at 1810:06 at an altitude of 13,800 feet. The airplane wreckage was located due north from this last recorded radar contact. Witnesses observed the airplane descend in a near vertical attitude, collide with the ground, and then explode. Components from all areas of the aircraft structure and flight control surfaces were located at the crash site along with components from both engines and propellers. Impact and post crash fire damage precluded the examination of the airplanes fuel system and components.
Probable cause:
The pilot's inflight loss of control following a reported fuel asymmetry condition for undetermined reasons.
Final Report: