Crash of a Cessna 425 Conquest in Lakeland: 1 killed

Date & Time: Feb 11, 1992 at 0602 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N66LM
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Bartow - Lakeland
MSN:
425-0137
YOM:
1981
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
10850
Circumstances:
The pilot departed VFR and flew to his destination and found it fogged in. He then requested and was given an IFR clearance for an ILS approach to another airport. He was observed to break out of the clouds at about 100 feet agl in a left bank and yaw. He then crashed short of the runway and to the left of the centerline. Examination of the airplane, engines and propellers revealed no preexisting failures. After the crash a fire partially consumed the wreckage. The pilot, sole on board, was killed.
Probable cause:
Loss of control in flight by the pilot for undetermined reasons.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 425 Conquest near Las Vegas: 7 killed

Date & Time: Jan 11, 1992 at 1808 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N425BN
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Las Vegas - Torrence
MSN:
425-0057
YOM:
1981
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
7
Captain / Total flying hours:
1900
Circumstances:
No record could be found showing the pilot received a weather briefing prior to takeoff. Unfavorable weather was in the vicinity. Several times the pilot had difficulties understanding and complying with instructions from clearance delivery, ground control, and departure control. After takeoff the pilot requested and received an IFR clearance. During the last five minutes of flight radar returns showed the airplane changing heading from 45° to as much as 180° about 10 times and descending or ascending several times from altitudes ranging from 4,500 feet msl to 11,500 feet msl. The altitude and heading changes were not directed by controllers. About 3 minutes before the accident departure control asked the pilot if he had a problem. The pilot indicated that he did and 'we're trying to get straight.' One minute later, the pilot said 'we're all right.' Shortly afterwards, radar data showed a loss of control. Radar and communications were lost and an on ground explosion was observed as the accident occurred. An FAA flight surgeon reviewed the pilot's medical records. Within one year of the accident the pilot had 3 physical conditions and was taking 3 separate prescriptions which would have prevented him from being medically qualified to pilot an aircraft. All seven occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain aircraft control due to spatial disorientation. Factors in this accident were:
1) the pilot's failure to obtain a preflight weather briefing and to properly evaluate the existing weather conditions prior to flight, and
2) reported unfavorable weather conditions, including turbulence, snow, rain, and obscuration at flight altitudes along the pilot's route of flight.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 425 Conquest I in Hanover: 7 killed

Date & Time: Oct 8, 1991
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
OE-FPS
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Vienna - Hanover
MSN:
425-0024
YOM:
1981
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
7
Circumstances:
On approach to Hanover-Langenhagen Airport, the pilot encountered poor visibility due to foggy conditions. Unable to locate the runway, he decided to initiate a go-around procedure when the aircraft lost height and crashed 200 metres short of runway 27R. The aircraft was destroyed and all seven occupants were killed. At the time of the accident, the visibility was reduced to 400 metres due to fog.
Probable cause:
It is believed that the pilot lost control of the aircraft while initiating a go-around procedure following an asymmetric thrust (the left engine apparently oversped).

Crash of a Cessna 425 Conquest I in Augusta

Date & Time: Jan 31, 1990 at 1415 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N6846D
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Columbia - Augusta
MSN:
425-0078
YOM:
1981
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2788
Captain / Total hours on type:
308.00
Aircraft flight hours:
1392
Circumstances:
The pilot detected an unacceptable sink rate on short final approach and initiated a go-around. After applying power and retracting the landing gear, the left wing dropped and struck the runway. The aircraft then ground looped and came to rest with substantial damage. The pilot escaped uninjured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
Failure of the pilot to maintain control of the aircraft during the go-around. A factor related to the accident was: the pilot's delay in initiating the go-around.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 425 Conquest in Lake Larouche: 1 killed

Date & Time: Nov 20, 1988
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
C-GBMI
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
MSN:
425-0031
YOM:
1981
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft crashed in unknown circumstances near Lake Larouche. The pilot, sole on board, was killed.

Crash of a Cessna 425 Conquest in Sanford: 1 killed

Date & Time: Feb 11, 1988 at 2212 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N6771Y
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Atlanta - Sanford
MSN:
425-0019
YOM:
1981
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
8750
Aircraft flight hours:
2269
Circumstances:
The flight was cleared for a night ILS approach and advised that tower at destination had closed. Tower had reported at closing that fog was forming and the flight was advised of the fog. The aircraft was located on a remote part of the airport the next morning. The ELT had activated but the signal was weak due to crash damage. Passenger said they never saw runway lights, only taxi lights, and that pilot attempted to perform a go-around. Gear was retracted and aircraft hit level grassy area in a near level attitude. The pilot was not wearing a shoulder harness. The pax crouched in the aisle next to the pilot, helping him find the runway, not wearing restraining belts. No published approach plate for ILS procedure for that runway was found in aircraft. Toxicological report revealed pilot had 3 mcg/ml dextromethorphan, an ingredient found in over counter cold remedies. According to report, levels of that substance in blood greater than 0.1 mcg/ml was sufficient to cause drowsiness.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: in flight collision with terrain/water
Phase of operation: missed approach (ifr)
Findings
1. (f) weather condition - fog
2. (c) decision height - disregarded - pilot in command
3. (f) light condition - night
4. Meteorological services - not operating
5. (c) missed approach - improper - pilot in command
6. Control tower - not operating
7. (c) gear retraction - premature - pilot in command
8. (c) in-flight planning/decision - poor - pilot in command
9. (f) impairment (drugs) - pilot in command
10. Shoulder harness - not used - pilot in command
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 425 Conquest I in Bern: 8 killed

Date & Time: Mar 3, 1986 at 0822 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
HB-LLS
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Bern - Düsseldorf
MSN:
425-0040
YOM:
1981
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
8
Captain / Total flying hours:
1363
Captain / Total hours on type:
514.00
Aircraft flight hours:
1074
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft was engaged in a charter flight from Bern to Düsseldorf, carrying one pilot and seven employees from the textile industry. Takeoff was completed from runway 32 partially covered with wet snow and after liftoff, the aircraft encountered difficulties to gain height and passed just over trees located from either side of the Aar River. Then the aircraft lost height, initiated a left turn then stalled and crashed in a snow covered field located near a wood, about 1,250 meters northwest of runway 14 threshold and 600 meters to the left of its extended centerline. The aircraft was destroyed and all eight occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
The accident was the consequence of a loss of control during initial climb in poor weather conditions. The following contributing factors were reported:
- The runway was contaminated with wet snow,
- Possible ice on wings and tail,
- High drag because the gear was still down,
- The total weight of the aircraft was 102 kilos above MTOW,
- The CofG was 0,56 inch (1,42 cm) beyond the aft limit,
- The pilot suffered high psychological tension,
- It is possible that the flaps were lowered at an angle of 15° prior to takeoff, during takeoff and during initial climb, which may reduce lift and increase drag.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 425 Conquest in Granby: 5 killed

Date & Time: Jan 11, 1986 at 1045 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N425SC
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Hutchison - Granby
MSN:
425-0126
YOM:
1982
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
3085
Captain / Total hours on type:
156.00
Aircraft flight hours:
935
Circumstances:
During arrival, the pilot advised ARTCC that the destination airport appeared to be covered with fog. She then canceled her IFR flight plan. According to ground witnesses, the aircraft made several passes over the airport. Witnesses also reported that the horizontal visibility was nil, but they could see blue sky directly above. During the last pass, the aircraft crossed over the approach end of the runway with the gear and flaps extended, angling to the left of the runway heading. Moments later, witnesses heard the engines go to full power, then silence followed. The aircraft was found where it impacted rising snow covered terrain approximately 1/8 mile south of the midpoint of the airport. There was evidence that the aircraft was in a steep descending, right wing low attitude when it crashed. No preimpact part failure/malfunction was found. A passenger was seriously injured while five other occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: in flight encounter with weather
Phase of operation: approach - vfr pattern - final approach
Findings
1. (c) in-flight planning/decision - improper - pilot in command
2. (f) terrain condition - snow covered
3. (f) weather condition - fog
4. (c) vfr flight into imc - continued - pilot in command
5. (f) visual/aural perception - pilot in command
----------
Occurrence #2: loss of control - in flight
Phase of operation: go-around (vfr)
Findings
6. Go-around - initiated - pilot in command
7. (c) aircraft handling - not maintained - pilot in command
----------
Occurrence #3: in flight collision with terrain/water
Phase of operation: approach
Findings
8. (f) terrain condition - rising
9. Descent - uncontrolled
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 425 Conquest in Dayton

Date & Time: May 29, 1985 at 1828 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N2079A
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Dayton - Dayton
MSN:
425-0001
YOM:
1981
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
12220
Captain / Total hours on type:
11.00
Aircraft flight hours:
876
Circumstances:
The aircraft involved was experimentally configured with 4-bladed props and was on a test flight to determine handling characteristics following a throttle chop to idle power at 50 feet agl. This maneuver had been accomplished twice on the test flight without incident. On the third landing, the pilot later stated, that he retarded the throttles more briskly than on previous approaches. Observers on the plane and on the ground then saw a yaw and a wing drop. The right gear struck the runway first, followed by the left and nose gears. All three gear then sheared off. The aircraft slid to a stop off the runway 975 feet from initial impact. A postaccident teardown of the props revealed no preexisting misadjustments or abnormalities.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: abrupt maneuver
Phase of operation: landing - flare/touchdown
Findings
1. (c) proper descent rate - not maintained - pilot in command
2. (c) remedial action - delayed - pilot in command
----------
Occurrence #2: hard landing
Phase of operation: landing - flare/touchdown
----------
Occurrence #3: complete gear collapsed
Phase of operation: landing - flare/touchdown
Findings
3. (f) design stress limits of aircraft - exceeded - pilot in command
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 425 Conquest in Ithaca

Date & Time: Feb 25, 1984 at 1050 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N6886D
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Worcester - Ithaca
MSN:
425-0152
YOM:
1982
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3541
Captain / Total hours on type:
401.00
Circumstances:
The pilot stated that he was utilizing the autopilot and flight director to execute the ILS approach to runway 32. The autopilot was tracking the localizer while the pilot controlled the rate of descent along the glideslope with pitch command wheel on the autopilot, using the command bars as a steering reference in addition to the raw data glideslope needle on the hsi. All seemed normal, according to the pilot, until the aircraft struck trees about 450 feet above airport elevation two miles short of the runway and came to rest on the localizer centerline. A zero feet ceiling with an eighth mile visibility existed at the airport. During the investigations, it was determined that the 1000 a ifcs will not provide vertical steering commands as operated by the pilot, but is driven by the pitch wheel. This is not specifically stated in the poh. The pilot had flown extensively with the 800 series ifcs which will provide the expected steering commands. Extensive damage precluded a functional test of the raw data glideslope needle. Both occupants were slightly injured.
Probable cause:
Occurrence #1: in flight collision with terrain/water
Phase of operation: approach - faf/outer marker to threshold (IFR)
Findings
1. (c) proper glidepath - not maintained - pilot in command
2. (c) reason for occurrence undetermined
3. (f) flight/navigation instrument(s) - improper use of - pilot in command
4. (f) weather condition - below approach/landing minimums
----------
Occurrence #2: fire
Phase of operation: other
Final Report: