Crash of a Cessna 425 Conquest I in Butler: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jun 10, 2019 at 1030 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N622MM
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Vero Beach - Olathe
MSN:
425-0187
YOM:
1983
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
En route from Vero Beach to Olathe, while cruising at an altitude of 26,000 feet, the pilot contacted ATC and reported technical problems. He was cleared to reduce his altitude and elected to divert to Butler Airport. On final, the twin engine airplane struck a grain bin and crashed on the ground. The pilot, sole on board, was killed.

Crash of a Cessna 425 Conquest in Windhoek: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jan 29, 2016 at 1011 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
V5-MJW
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Windhoek - Windhoek
MSN:
425-0077
YOM:
1981
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
The crew was completing a local training flight at Windhoek-Hosea Kutako Airport. On final approach, the twin engine aircraft went out of control and crashed in flames 3 km short of the runway threshold. The aircraft was totally destroyed by a post crash fire and all three crew members were killed.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 425 Conquest I in Canadian

Date & Time: Mar 28, 2011 at 0825 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N410VE
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Grand Junction - Canadian
MSN:
425-0097
YOM:
1981
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
22500
Captain / Total hours on type:
1000.00
Aircraft flight hours:
7412
Circumstances:
While on a straight-in global-positioning-system approach, the airplane broke out of the clouds directly over the end of the runway. The pilot then remained clear of the clouds and executed a no-flap circling approach to the opposite direction runway. The pilot said that his airspeed was high when he touched down. The landing was hard, and the right main landing gear tire blew out, the airplane departed the runway to the left, and the left main landing gear collapsed. No preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures were found that would have precluded normal operation.
Probable cause:
The pilot’s continuation of the approach with excessive airspeed, which resulted in a hard landing and a loss of directional control.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 425 in Munich

Date & Time: Feb 2, 2010 at 0210 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
D-IAWF
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Hanover - Munich
MSN:
425-0222
YOM:
1985
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
3600
Captain / Total hours on type:
400.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
5200
Copilot / Total hours on type:
300
Aircraft flight hours:
5836
Aircraft flight cycles:
4376
Circumstances:
Crew stated that during a positioning flight at night in accordance with Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) from Hanover to Munich problems with the left engine occurred. The engine was shut off and the flight continued to the destination airport. During final approach with one engine inoperable the airplane crashed to the ground left and short of the runway. The occupants remained uninjured; the airplane was severely damaged.
Probable cause:
The accident was due to:
- When the left engine was shut off the propeller was not feathered
- During the final approach the speed for an approach with one shut-off engine was lower than stipulated
- The airplane veered to the left during power increase and became uncontrollable due to the lack of rudder effectiveness.
Contributory factors were:
- non-adherence to checklists during the shut-off of the engine and,
- poor crew coordination.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 425 Conquest I in Harbor Springs

Date & Time: Jan 12, 2007 at 1830 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N425TN
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Toledo - Harbor Springs
MSN:
425-0196
YOM:
1984
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
1991
Captain / Total hours on type:
60.00
Aircraft flight hours:
2345
Circumstances:
The pilot reported that during cruise descent the airplane accumulated about 1/2-to 3/4-inch of rime ice between 8,000 and 6,000 feet. During the approach, the pilot noted that a majority of the ice had dissipated off the leading edge of both wings, although there was still trace ice on the aft-portion of the wing deice boots. The pilot maintained an additional 20 knots during final approach due to gusting winds from the north-northwest. He anticipated there would be turbulence caused by the surrounding topography and the buildings on the north side of the airport. While on short final for runway 28, the pilot maintained approximately 121 knots indicated airspeed (KIAS) and selected flaps 30-degrees. He used differential engine power to assist staying on the extended centerline until the airplane crossed the runway threshold. After crossing the threshold, the pilot began a landing flare and the airspeed slowed toward red line (92 KIAS). Shortly before touchdown, the airplane "abruptly pitched up and was pushed over to the left" and flight control inputs were "only marginally effective" in keeping the wings level. The airplane drifted off the left side of the runway and began a "violent shuddering." According to the pilot, flight control inputs "produced no change in aircraft heading, or altitude." The pilot advanced the engine throttles for a go-around as the left wing impacted the terrain. The airplane cartwheeled and subsequently caught fire. No pre-impact anomalies were noted with the airplane's flight control systems and deice control valves during a postaccident examination. No ice shapes were located on the ground leading up to the main wreckage. The reported surface wind was approximately 4 knots from the north-northwest.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain aircraft control and adequate airspeed during landing flare. Contributing to the accident was the aerodynamic stall/mush encountered at a low altitude.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 425 Conquest in Toliara: 6 killed

Date & Time: Oct 25, 2006 at 0417 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
5R-MGV
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Toliara-Tananarive
MSN:
425-0032
YOM:
1981
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Circumstances:

The aircraft was performing a special flight from Toliara to the capital city Antananarivo with 4 pax and a crew of two on behalf of the company Magrama (Marbres & Granites de Madagascar). Two minutes after takeoff, the aircraft crashed and burst into flames 1,500 metres from the runway end. All 6 occupants were killed. Among them, 4 Italians and 2 Madagascar citizens. It seems that one of the engine exploded after takeoff.

Crash of a Cessna 425 Conquest I in Bozeman: 1 killed

Date & Time: Nov 29, 2005 at 1742 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N701QR
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Algona - Bozeman
MSN:
425-0148
YOM:
1981
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
1987
Captain / Total hours on type:
1675.00
Aircraft flight hours:
4504
Circumstances:
The airplane was on the final approach segment of an instrument flight rules (IFR) cross country flight that originated approximately 3 hours and 45 minutes prior to the accident when radio communications with the aircraft were lost. The aircraft wreckage was located the following day approximately 2.8 miles from the destination airport. The airplane impacted terrain in a vertical descent and flat attitude and came to rest upright on its fuselage and wings. The cockpit and cabin were intact and both wing assemblies remained attached to the fuselage. Evidence of forward velocity and/or leading edge deformation was not observed to the wings or fuselage. Mixed ice was noted along the leading edge of both wings. At the time of the accident, weather conditions were reported as low ceilings and low visibility due to snow and mist. The accident occurred during dark night conditions. Air traffic control (ATC) transcripts indicated that shortly after entering the holding pattern at 11,000 feet the pilot was issued an approach clearance for the ILS. The pilot acknowledged the clearance and approximately two minutes later ATC communications with the pilot were lost. Pilot logbook records showed that the pilot's total flight time was approximately 1,987 hours. In the six-month period preceding the accident, the pilot logged approximately 40 hours total time, 9 hours of actual instrument time and 7 instrument approaches in the accident airplane. The pilot's total night flying experience was approximately 51 hours. The pilot made no entries in his pilot logbook indicating that he had flown at night in the six-month time frame preceding the accident. Pilots flying the ILS approach prior to the accident aircraft reported mixed icing during the descent and final approach. Post accident examination of the aircraft revealed no evidence to indicate a mechanical malfunction or failure.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to maintain airspeed during the approach which resulted in an inadvertent stall. Factors associated with the accident were dark night conditions, clouds, icing conditions, low visibility and snow.
Final Report: