Country
code

Western Cape

Crash of a Cessna S550 Citation S/II near George: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jan 23, 2020 at 1050 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
ZS-CAR
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
George - George
MSN:
S550-0078
YOM:
1985
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
A Cessna S550 Citation S/II of the South African Civil Aviation Authority crashed into the Outeniqua mountains, near the town of Friemersheim. The three occupants were killed and the aircraft was destroyed. The Citation departed Port Elizabeth Airport (FAPE) on a positioning flight to George Airport (FAGG). On approach to FAGG, the flying crew requested to carry out a calibration flight for the very high frequency omnidirectional range (VOR) beacon at FAGG. Due to inclement weather conditions at the time, they were not cleared to conduct VOR calibration. As a result, they decided to land and refuel the aircraft before commencing with the calibration of the Instrument Landing System (ILS) on runway 11 at FAGG. The flying crew requested take-off from runway 11 and an early right turn to intercept radial 250°, 17 nautical miles (nm) DME arc to radial 330° at 3000 feet (ft) climbing to 4,000 feet. The air traffic control (ATC) granted their request. Radar data indicated that at 10:42, the aircraft took off from runway 11 and, once airborne, made a right-hand turn to intercept radial 250° using the George VOR (GRV VOR). The aircraft climbed to 3000ft. Once the aircraft reached 17 nm on the DME from the GRV VOR (DME is co-located with the VOR), it commenced with a right-hand turn to intercept radial 330° while maintaining 17nm DME arc. At 10:46, the ATC at FAGG advised the flying crew that they were now exiting controlled airspace and were advised to broadcast on the special rules frequency. The crew acknowledged the advisory to change frequency and there was no further communication. The aircraft was still being monitored by ATC using secondary surveillance radar. At 10:50, radar data showed the aircraft crossing radial 310° and entered a climb from 3000ft, reaching 3,900 feet. As the aircraft levelled off at 3,900 feet, a rapid descent occurred, and the aircraft lost 1500ft in approximately 9 seconds. Three seconds prior to impact, the aircraft nose pitched up before impacting a ridge at 2,192 feet.

Crash of a Cessna 208 Caravan I at Langebaanweg AFB

Date & Time: Mar 3, 2016
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
3004
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Langebaanweg - Langebaanweg
MSN:
208-0130
YOM:
1988
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The crew was completing a local night training exercice at Langebaanweg AFB. While completing various manoeuvres, the airplane went out of control and crashed in an open field located near airbase, coming to rest upside down. The aircraft was destroyed and both pilots were injured.

Crash of an Eclipse EA500 near Swellendam: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 7, 2015 at 1057 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
ZS-DKS
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Lanseria - Cape Town
MSN:
142
YOM:
2008
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
2977
Captain / Total hours on type:
506.00
Aircraft flight hours:
714
Circumstances:
The aircraft had taken off on a private flight with the pilot being the sole occupant on board. The pilot had filed an IFR flight plan and had informed air traffic control (ATC) at FALA that the aircraft had a fuel endurance of 4 hours and his estimated flying time to FACT was approximately 2 hours and 30 minutes. After take-off the aircraft climbed to its cruising altitude of 36 000 feet (FL360) as was seen on the radar recordings. The pilot maintained communication with ATC until overhead Kimberley. Shortly thereafter the aircraft was observed to change course, turning slightly left before the town of Douglas. The aircraft remained at FL360 and was observed to fly south towards the waypoint OKTED, which was a substantial distance to the east of FACT. FACT could not get communication with the aircraft and the aeronautical rescue co-ordination centre (ARCC) was advised of the situation. The aircraft was kept under constant radar surveillance. The ARCC requested assistance from the South African Air Force (SAAF) and a Gripen (military jet) from Air Force Base Overberg (FAOB) was dispatched to intercept the aircraft. The pilot of the Gripen intercepted the aircraft approximately 3 minutes before it impacted the terrain. The Gripen pilot was unable to get close enough to the aircraft as it was flying very erratically, and he could therefore not see whether the pilot was conscious or not. The aircraft was observed entering a left spiral and continue spiraling down until it impacted the ground. The pilot was fatally injured and the aircraft was destroyed during the impact sequence.
Probable cause:
The investigation revealed no anomalies on the part of the aircraft and all damage was attributed to the impact with the ground. The fatal injuries sustained by the pilot made it impossible to determine if the pilot was incapacitated or not. It was observed that the aircraft performed a series of unexplainable as well as erratic flying manoeuvres, which resulted in a loss of control and the aircraft to enter into a spiral dive, which was observed by the Gripen pilot before colliding with the ground.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 441 Conquest II in Cape Town: 5 killed

Date & Time: Aug 16, 2015 at 0629 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
V5-NRS
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Oranjemund - Cape Town
MSN:
441-0288
YOM:
1983
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
6353
Captain / Total hours on type:
1357.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
1394
Copilot / Total hours on type:
1
Aircraft flight hours:
7605
Circumstances:
On 15 August 2015 at 2351Z a Cessna 441 aeroplane, with two crew and a paramedic on board took off from Eros Airport (FYWE) on a medical evacuation flight with their intended final destination Cape Town International Airport (FACT). The aircraft landed at Oranjemund (FYOG) to pick up a male patient and his daughter. At 0206Z the aircraft departed from FYOG on a mercy flight to FACT. At 0343Z the aircraft made the first contact with FACT area and the aircraft was put under radar control. At 0355Z, area control advised the crew that there was a complete radar failure. The aircraft was on a descent to 6500 ft when approach advised them to prepare for a VOR approach for runway 19. At 0429Z, while on approach for landing at FACT, all contact was lost with the aircraft. At approximately 0556Z the aircraft’s wreckage was located approximately 8 nm to the north of FACT. All five occupants on board were fatally injured and the aircraft was destroyed by impact and post impact fire. The investigation revealed the aircraft collided with terrain during instrument meteorological condition (IMC) conditions while on the VOR approach for Runway 19 at FACT. At the time the ILS was working, however the approach controller offered a VOR approach for separation with an outbound aircraft as the radar was unserviceable.
Probable cause:
The aircraft collided with terrain during instrument meteorological flight conditions while on the VOR approach Runway 19.
Final Report:

Crash of a Pilatus PC-12/47 off Plettenberg Bay: 9 killed

Date & Time: Feb 8, 2011 at 1633 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
ZS-GAA
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Queenstown - Plettenberg Bay
MSN:
858
YOM:
2007
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
9
Captain / Total flying hours:
2662
Captain / Total hours on type:
582.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
351
Copilot / Total hours on type:
112
Aircraft flight hours:
1096
Circumstances:
The aircraft, which was operated under the provisions of Part 91 of the Civil Aviation Regulations (CARs), departed from Queenstown Aerodrome (FAQT) at 1329Z on an instrument flight plan for Plettenberg Bay Aerodrome (FAPG). On board the aircraft were two (2) crew members and seven (7) passengers. The estimated time of arrival for the aircraft to land at FAPG was 1430Z, however the aircraft never arrived at its intended destination, nor did the crew cancel their search and rescue as per flight plan/air navigation requirements. At ±1600Z an official search for the missing aircraft commenced. The search was coordinated by the Aeronautical Rescue Co-ordination Centre (ARCC). The first phase of the search, which was land based, was conducted in the Robberg Nature Reserve area. Progress was slow due to poor visibility associated with dense mist and night time. A sea search was not possible following activation of the official search during the late afternoon and night time, but vessels from the National Sea Rescue Institute (NSRI) were able to launch at first light the next morning. Floating debris (light weight material) was picked up from the sea and along the western shoreline of the Robberg Nature Reserve where foot patrols were conducted. On 11 February 2011 the South African Navy joined the search for the missing wreckage by utilizing side scan sonar equipment to scan the sea bed for the wreckage. All the occupants on board the aircraft were fatally injured in the accident.
Probable cause:
The aircraft crashed into the sea following a possible in flight upset associated with a loss of control during IMC conditions.
The following contributory factors were identified:
- Deviation from standard operating procedures by the crew not flying the published cloud-break procedure for runway 30 at FAPG, but instead opted to attempt to remain visual with the ground/sea (comply with VMC requirements) by descending over the sea and approaching the aerodrome from the southeast (Robberg Nature Reserve side).
- Inclement weather conditions prevailed in the area, which was below the minima to comply with the approved cloud-break procedure for runway 30 at FAPG (minimum safety altitude of 844 feet according to cloud-break procedure) as published at the time of the accident.
- Judgement and decision making lacking by the crew. (The crew continued from the seaward side with the approach during IMC conditions and not diverting to an alternative aerodrome with proper approach facilities timeously although a cell phone call in this regard indicate such an intention).
- The possibility that the pilot-flying at the time became spatially disorientated during the right turn while encountering / entering IMC conditions in an attempt to divert to FAGG should be regarded as a significant contributory factor to this accident.
- This was the first time as far as it could be determined that the two crew members flew together.
Final Report:

Crash of an Embraer 135 in George

Date & Time: Dec 7, 2009 at 1101 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
ZS-SJW
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Cape Town - George
MSN:
145-423
YOM:
2001
Flight number:
SA8625
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
32
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
11973
Captain / Total hours on type:
2905.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
2336
Copilot / Total hours on type:
864
Aircraft flight hours:
21291
Aircraft flight cycles:
17003
Circumstances:
Flight SA8625 departed from Cape Town International Airport on a domestic scheduled flight to George Airport (FAGG) with three crew members and 32 passengers on board. The weather at FAGG was overcast with light rain, and the aircraft was cleared for an instrument landing system approach for runway 11. It touched down between the third and fourth landing marker. According to the air traffic controller, the landing itself appeared normal, but the aircraft did not vacate the runway to the left as it should have. Instead, it veered to the right, overran the runway and rolled on past the ILS localiser. Realising that something was wrong, he activated the crash alarm. The cockpit crew did not broadcast any messages to indicate that they were experiencing a problem. The aircraft collided with eleven approach lights before bursting through the aerodrome perimeter fence and coming to rest in a nose-down attitude on the R404 public road. Several motorists stopped and helped the passengers, who evacuated the aircraft through the service door (right front) and left mid-fuselage emergency exit. The aerodrome fire and rescue personnel arrived within minutes and assisted with the evacuation of the cockpit crew, who were trapped in the cockpit. Ten occupants were admitted to a local hospital for a check-up and released after a few hours. No serious injuries were reported.
Probable cause:
The crew were unable to decelerate the aircraft to a safe stop due to ineffective braking of the aircraft on a wet runway surface, resulting in an overrun.
Contributory factors:
- The aircraft crossed the runway threshold at 50 ft AGL at 143 KIAS, which was 15 kt above the calculated VREF speed.
- Although the aircraft initially touched down within the touchdown zone the transition back into air mode of 1.5 seconds followed by a 4 second delay in applying the brakes after the aircraft remained in permanent ground mode should be considered as a significant contributory factor to this accident as it was imperative to decelerate the aircraft as soon as possible.
- Two of the four main tyres displayed limited to no tyre tread. This was considered to have degraded the displacement of water from the tyre footprint, which had a significant effect on the braking effectiveness of the aircraft during the landing rollout on the wet runway surface.
Several non-compliance procedures were not followed.
Final Report:

Crash of a Swearingen SA227AC Metro III in George

Date & Time: Sep 10, 2004 at 0545 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
ZS-OLS
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Bloemfontein – George
MSN:
AC-748B
YOM:
1989
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2465
Captain / Total hours on type:
657.00
Aircraft flight hours:
8760
Circumstances:
The aircraft was on a Domestic Charter flight (IFR) from Bloemfontein Aerodrome to George Aerodrome when the crew elected to execute an ILS approach for landing onto Runway 11. At 1,000 feet from the threshold of Runway 11 with the undercarriage selected down and at full flaps for landing at an IAS of 120kt when he advised the copilot that was the flying pilot at the time, to continue visually with the approach for Runway 11. Shortly thereafter they heard a loud impact sound and the right hand engine failed. The aircraft suddenly yawed and banked severely to the right and the flying pilot commented that they had experienced a bird strike on the right hand engine. The pilot-in-command immediately took over the controls and attempted to arrest the yaw to the right but the aircraft kept yawing to the right. He then made a blind transmission on frequency 118.9 MHz and called for a go-around. The co-pilot then selected full power on both engines retracted the undercarriage, whilst the pilot-in-command feathered the right-hand propeller. According to the pilot-in-command, the aircraft continued to yaw to the right and with the stall aural warning sounding with a loss of altitude, he pulled the left-hand engine stop and feather control and was committed to execute a forced landing on a cattle farm The pilot-in-command stated that aircraft was approximately just outside the boundary fence. Both wings collided with the gum poles of a telephone and wire fence causing extensive damage to the wings and fuselage under-surface. Both occupants sustained no injuries.
Probable cause:
The aircraft encountered a bird strike on the right-hand engine prior to landing at George Aerodrome. It appears that the cockpit crew did not apply the correct procedures for a go-around when the aircraft yawed Severely to the right. The aircraft failed to climb and a forced landing was executed on a cattle farm.
Final Report:

Crash of an Avro 748 in George: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jun 1, 2002 at 0715 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
ZS-OJU
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Bloemfontein - George
MSN:
1782
YOM:
1980
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
20963
Captain / Total hours on type:
1819.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
1099
Copilot / Total hours on type:
518
Aircraft flight hours:
14226
Aircraft flight cycles:
19789
Circumstances:
The aircraft was on a scheduled freight flight from Bloemfontein to George. Poor weather conditions prevailed over the George area and the pilots had to execute an instrument guided approach for the landing. The ground based Instrument Landing System (ILS) on Runway 29 at George Aerodrome was intermittently unreliable during the approach. The pilots decided to execute a missed approach. During the missed approach the pilots did not comply with the published missed approach procedure and with a combination of strong winds and possible erroneous heading indications they lost situational awareness. They flew the aircraft into a valley and crashed into the side of the mountains North-East of the George Aerodrome. The passenger was Hansie Cronje, a former South African cricket captain who had missed a South African Airlines flight.
Probable cause:
The crew deviated from the prescribed missed approach procedure during an attempted Instrument Landing System landing on Runway 29 at George in Instrument Meteorological Conditions and lost situational awareness aggravated by the presence of strong upper SouthWesterly winds. They allowed the aircraft to drift off course resulting in a controlled impact with terrain 6.7 nm North-East of the aerodrome. Contributing factors to the probable cause were the weather conditions, the intermittent unreliability of the Instrument Landing System, the serviceability of the directional gyro and the uncleared defects.
Final Report:

Crash of a Dornier DO.28D-1 Skyservant in Mossel Bay

Date & Time: May 16, 1988
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
ZS-PRW
Flight Phase:
MSN:
4028
YOM:
1969
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
0
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Crashed in unknown circumstances. Occupant's fate unknown.

Crash of a Cessna 402B in Cape Town: 7 killed

Date & Time: Jun 5, 1983 at 1323 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
ZS-KVG
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Cape Town - Lanseria
MSN:
402B-1094
YOM:
1976
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
8
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
7
Circumstances:
The pilot, Lorance Weinberg, had a history of logging hours on aircraft he had not been trained to fly as well as logging hours on aircraft in which he had only traveled as a passenger. On 4 June 1983 he booked a Cessna 402 under false pretenses to fly to Durban, but in fact took a party of 9 to Cape Town for a wedding. The following day he filed an IFR flight plan to return to Johannesburg when he was not IFR rated, but had trouble filling in the forms. He took off just before 13:00 in deteriorating weather with his 8 passengers and immediately ran into trouble. He did not follow any instructions from air traffic control and evaded their questions when they decided it would be best to bring him back for landing. It was noted on radar that he was flying in ever decreasing circles until the aircraft finally crashed onto the Polkadraai Road running between Kuils River and Stellenbosch. Weinberg, five adult passengers and a baby were killed, but two adults survived.
Source: Fields of Air by James Byrom.
Probable cause:
The CAA determined that the pilot had undertaken a flight for which he was not qualified, or trained, to act as pilot in command. He took off in instrument meteorological conditions when he was not instrument rated and suffered from spatial disorientation and because of a lack of training flew into the ground.