Crash of an Antonov AN-26KPA near Khabarovsk: 6 killed

Date & Time: Sep 22, 2021
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
RA-26673
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
MSN:
84 08
YOM:
1979
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
6
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Circumstances:
The aircraft was completing an aerial work mission (calibration), carrying six crew members. En route, the aircraft impacted trees and crashed in a wooded area located on the slope of Mt Khrebtovaya located in the Bolchoï Khekhtsir Mountain Range. The wreckage was found a day later at an altitude of 786 metres and some 38-40 km southwest from the Khabarovsk-Novy Airport. The aircraft was totally destroyed by impact forces and all six occupants were killed. At the time of the accident, the visibility was reduced to 2 km due to low clouds.

Crash of a Cessna S550 Citation S/II near George: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jan 23, 2020 at 1050 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
ZS-CAR
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
George - George
MSN:
S550-0078
YOM:
1985
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
A Cessna S550 Citation S/II of the South African Civil Aviation Authority crashed into the Outeniqua mountains, near the town of Friemersheim. The three occupants were killed and the aircraft was destroyed. The Citation departed Port Elizabeth Airport (FAPE) on a positioning flight to George Airport (FAGG). On approach to FAGG, the flying crew requested to carry out a calibration flight for the very high frequency omnidirectional range (VOR) beacon at FAGG. Due to inclement weather conditions at the time, they were not cleared to conduct VOR calibration. As a result, they decided to land and refuel the aircraft before commencing with the calibration of the Instrument Landing System (ILS) on runway 11 at FAGG. The flying crew requested take-off from runway 11 and an early right turn to intercept radial 250°, 17 nautical miles (nm) DME arc to radial 330° at 3000 feet (ft) climbing to 4,000 feet. The air traffic control (ATC) granted their request. Radar data indicated that at 10:42, the aircraft took off from runway 11 and, once airborne, made a right-hand turn to intercept radial 250° using the George VOR (GRV VOR). The aircraft climbed to 3000ft. Once the aircraft reached 17 nm on the DME from the GRV VOR (DME is co-located with the VOR), it commenced with a right-hand turn to intercept radial 330° while maintaining 17nm DME arc. At 10:46, the ATC at FAGG advised the flying crew that they were now exiting controlled airspace and were advised to broadcast on the special rules frequency. The crew acknowledged the advisory to change frequency and there was no further communication. The aircraft was still being monitored by ATC using secondary surveillance radar. At 10:50, radar data showed the aircraft crossing radial 310° and entered a climb from 3000ft, reaching 3,900 feet. As the aircraft levelled off at 3,900 feet, a rapid descent occurred, and the aircraft lost 1500ft in approximately 9 seconds. Three seconds prior to impact, the aircraft nose pitched up before impacting a ridge at 2,192 feet.

Crash of a BAe U-125 at Kanoya AFB: 6 killed

Date & Time: Apr 6, 2016 at 1435 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
49-3043
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Kanoya - Kanoya
MSN:
258242
YOM:
1993
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
6
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Circumstances:
The aircraft departed Kanoya AFB at 1315LT on a calibration flight with six people on board. After he complete a counter clockwise arc, the crew started the descent to Kanoya AFB Runway 08R. The visibility was poor due to low clouds. On approach, at an altitude of 3,000 feet, the aircraft entered clouds when the GPWS alarm sounded. Two second later, the crew deactivated the alarm and continued the approach. Ten seconds later, the aircraft impacted trees and crashed on the slope of Mt Takakuma (1,182 metres high) located 10 km north of the airbase. The wreckage was found a day later and all six crew members were killed.
Probable cause:
Controlled flight into terrain after the crew continued the approach in poor visibility without visual contact with the environment. Misidentification of the environment on part of the crew was a contributing factor, as well as the fact that the crew deactivated the GPWS alarm and failed to initiate corrective maneuver.

Crash of a Dassault Falcon 20E off Kish Island: 4 killed

Date & Time: Mar 3, 2014 at 1845 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
EP-FIC
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Kish Island - Kish Island
MSN:
334
YOM:
1975
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
The Aircraft mission was Calibration flight. The flight was planned for departure from Mehrabad airport, Tehran to Kish Island airport. Eight persons were onboard of the aircraft (3 Pilots, 4 Ground technicians, a Security guard member). The flight was under operation of Iran Aseman Airline with valid Air Operation Certificate (AOC No; FS-102). The aircraft has taken off from RWY 29L from THR airport at 15:03 Local time and reached to cruise level FL270.The aircraft has landed on RWY 09 L Kish island airports at 16:44 local time. Four ground technicians have got off from the aircraft and refueling was done. At time 17:44 LMT , the aircraft has taken off RWY 27R and requested to join Right downwind up to 1000 ft. and 8 miles from the airport. After successful performing 7 complete flight (approach & climbing) for Navigation – Aids inspection purposes; at the 8th cycle, just at turning to the final stage of approach before runway threshold the aircraft crashed into the sea and was destroyed at time 18:45 local time. All four occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Regarding aforementioned analyses it seems that the fatigues of pilots have caused incapability to adopt themselves with flight conditions and their interactions are due to spatial disorientation
(illusion). This type of error prevented pilots to avoid from crash in to the sea.
Contributing Factors:
- Malfunction of aircraft radio altimeter.
- Flight crew fatigue.
- Lack of enough supervision on flight calibration operations.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 402 in Coventry: 4 killed

Date & Time: Aug 17, 2008 at 1136 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
G-EYES
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Coventry - Coventry
MSN:
402-0008
YOM:
1979
Region:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
1627
Captain / Total hours on type:
125.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
2281
Copilot / Total hours on type:
339
Circumstances:
Cessna 402C aircraft G-EYES was engaged in flight calibration training and was making an ILS approach to Runway 23 at Coventry Airport when it was involved in a mid-air collision with a Rand KR-2 aircraft, G-BOLZ, operating in the visual circuit. The collision occurred in Class G (uncontrolled) airspace. The four occupants of G-EYES and the single occupant of G-BOLZ received fatal injuries.
Probable cause:
The investigation identified the following primary causal factor:
The two aircraft collided because their respective pilots either did not see the other aircraft, or did not see it in time to take effective avoiding action.
The investigation identified the following contributory factors:
1. The likelihood that the crew of G-EYES would see G-BOLZ in time to carry out effective avoiding action was reduced by the small size of G-BOLZ, its position relative to G-EYES and the high rate of closure between the aircraft.
2. Insufficient or inaccurate information was provided to the pilots, which did not assist them in fulfilling their duty to take all possible measures to avoid collisions with other aircraft.
3. The Aerodrome Controller’s sequencing plan, which was based on an incomplete understanding of the nature of G-EYES’ flight, was unlikely to have been successful. By the time the risk of a collision was identified, it was too late to devise an effective method of resolving the situation.
4. There were no effective measures in place to give G-EYES priority over traffic in the visual circuit
Final Report:

Crash of a Yakovlev Yak-40 near Naryn

Date & Time: Jun 23, 2007 at 1114 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
EX-901
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Bishkek – Issyk Kul – Naryn
MSN:
9411030A
YOM:
1974
Flight number:
KR4452
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
9
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The crew departed Bishkek on a special flight to Issyk Kul and Naryn to proceed with the calibration of the ILS systems. About 30 minutes into the flight from Issyk Kul to Naryn, the right engine started to vibrate while the left engine temperature increased. After the right engine was shut down, the captain asked the flight engineer to reduce the power on the left engine by 80%. While flying in the Karakuzhur Valley and unable to maintain a safe altitude, the pilot remembered he was using in the past an old dirt strip for agricultural operations as he was flying Antonov AN-2. He attempted to land on this airstrip located at an altitude of 2,700 metres. Upon landing, the aircraft collided with rocks (larger than 40 cm) and drainage ditches and came to rest, bursting into flames. All 14 occupants escaped uninjured while the aircraft was destroyed.

Crash of a Cessna 650 Citation VI near Xichang: 3 killed

Date & Time: Sep 2, 2002 at 1050 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
B-7023
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Xichang - Xichang
MSN:
650-0221
YOM:
1992
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
The aircraft was dispatched at Xichang Airport to proceed to the calibration of the ILS system. Following a calibration of the runway 36 ILS, the crew initiated a go-around procedure and climbed to 8,000 feet. While completing a 180 turn to join the runway 36 approach pattern, the aircraft impacted a mountain (2,628 metres high) shrouded in clouds and located 15 km southwest of the airport. The aircraft was destroyed and all three crew members were killed. At the time of the accident, the aircraft was cruising at an altitude of 8,400 feet while the minimum altitude for this area is 9,000 feet.
Probable cause:
Controlled flight into terrain.

Crash of a Beechcraft 300 Super King Air near Donaueschingen: 4 killed

Date & Time: Oct 24, 2000 at 1716 LT
Registration:
D-CFMC
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Donaueschingen - Donaueschingen
MSN:
FA-104
YOM:
1986
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft departed Donaueschingen-Villingen Airport in the afternoon on a local calibration mission. After several circuits over the area at an altitude of 7,000 feet, both NDB and DME systems have been calibrated and the crew was returning to the airport at the end of the afternoon. While approaching runway 36 in marginal weather conditions, the crew failed to realize his altitude was insufficient when the aircraft struck trees and crashed in a wooded area located about 15 km from the airport. The aircraft was destroyed and all four occupants were killed. According to published procedures, the crew was supposed to continue the approach at a minimum altitude of 4,500 feet until 11 km from the runway threshold then descending to 2,650 feet. For unknown reasons, the crew started the descent prematurely, causing the aircraft to impact terrain.
Probable cause:
Controlled flight into terrain after the crew descended too low under VFR mode in IMC conditions. The following contributing factors were identified:
- The crew canceled the IFR flight plan for an approach under VFR mode despite weather conditions were marginal and the visibility was insufficient,
- The crew failed to follow the approach checklist,
- The crew failed to complete an approach briefing,
- The crew did not proceed to any callouts on approach,
- The second pilot was procedurally not involved in cockpit work processes and decision-making,
- On approach, the crew referred to the Flight Management System (FMS type III series) which was initially dedicated to flight inspection purposes only,
- Measurement was performed by the flight engineer.

Crash of a Mitsubishi MU-2B-35 Marquise in Den Helder

Date & Time: Jul 20, 2000
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N8484T
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Den Helder - Den Helder
MSN:
617
YOM:
1973
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
5050
Circumstances:
The aircraft departed Den Helder-De Kooy Airport on a radar tracking flight over the North Sea. Following an uneventful mission, the crew was returning to De Kooy Airport. After touchdown on runway 03, the crew activated the thrust reverser systems when the aircraft lost controllability. The pilot attempted to maintain control and selected the left throttle from 'reverse' again to turn to the right. Eventually, he feathered the right propeller and cut off the fuel supply, causing the right engine to stop. The aircraft veered off runway to the left and came to rest in a ditch. Both pilots escaped uninjured and the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
The landing speed, the touchdown point, the runway length and runway condition were considered as good. The problem was the consequence of an expired adjustment screw of the speed controller ('prop governor') on the right engine, so that it did not come into 'reverse pitch' but continued to provide forward thrust, causing an asymmetric aerodynamic braking effect. It was also determined that the Beta light indicator burned and could not light on, preventing the pilot from a possible issue on the reverse thrust system.
Final Report:

Crash of an Antonov AN-24RV in Baia Mare: 10 killed

Date & Time: Feb 22, 1996 at 1340 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
YR-BMK
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Bucarest – Satu Mare – Baia Mare
MSN:
7 73 108 03
YOM:
1977
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
10
Captain / Total flying hours:
7402
Captain / Total hours on type:
1456.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
383
Copilot / Total hours on type:
217
Aircraft flight hours:
10437
Aircraft flight cycles:
5987
Circumstances:
The aircraft, operated by the Romanian Civil Aviation Authority (Autoritatea Aeronautică Civilă Romănă) departed Bucharest-Băneasa Airport on a calibration flight to Satu Mare and Baia Mare Airports, carrying five passengers and three crew members. The goal of the operation was to calibrate the precision approach radar and the IFR equipment at both Satu Mare and Baia Mare Airports. The mission at Satu Mare was completed successfully and the crew continued to Baia Mare Airport located about 43 km to the east. Following three successful approaches, the crew initiated a fourth descent when he was informed by ATC about the deterioration of the weather conditions with snow falls and a reduced visibility to 3 km. On approach, the crew failed to realize his altitude was too low when the aircraft struck trees and crashed onto a house located about 7,5 km short of runway 28. The aircraft and the house were destroyed. All eight occupants were killed as well as two people in the house. A third people on the ground was injured.
Probable cause:
It was determined that the accident was the consequence of an incorrect execution of the turn to the magnetic heading of 276°.
Final Report: