Crash of a Beriev Be-200Chs near Kahramanmaraş: 8 killed

Date & Time: Aug 14, 2021
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
RF-88450
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
MSN:
64620090311
YOM:
2020
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
8
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
8
Circumstances:
Owned and operated by the Russian Navy, the aircraft was dispatched in Turkey in July to help the Turkish government (General Directorate of Forestry) to fight raging forest fires in the southeast part of the country. On board were eight crew members, five Russian and three Turkish. After the aircraft drop water on fire, the crew elected to gain height when the aircraft impacted terrain and crashed on the slope of a mountain, bursting into flames. The aircraft was totally destroyed and all 8 occupants were killed.

Crash of a Canadair CL-215-1A10 near Lindoso: 1 killed

Date & Time: Aug 8, 2020 at 1120 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
EC-HET
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
MSN:
1034
YOM:
1974
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
Operated by the Compañía de Extinción General de Incendios (CEGISA), the aircraft was dispatched over the region of Lindoso (near the border with Spain) to fight a fire on behalf of the Civil Security of Portugal (Autoridade Nacional de Emergência e Proteção Civil). In unknown circumstances, the aircraft struck the slope of a hilly and rocky terrain located in the Gerês Mountain Range, about 14 km southeast of Lindoso, few km south of the Portugal - Spain border. The tail separated on impact and the cockpit was destroyed. The Portuguese captain aged 65 was killed while the Spanish copilot aged 39 was seriously injured and transferred to an hospital in Alto Minho.

Crash of a Lockheed EC-130Q Hercules near Peak View: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jan 23, 2020 at 1400 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N134CG
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Richmond - Richmond
MSN:
4904
YOM:
1981
Flight number:
Tanker 134
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
The airplane departed Richmond Airbase and was conducting fire control operations when contact was lost. Witnesses on the ground reported hearing a loud bang and saw a giant fireball around the time of the crash. ATSB said the fire retardant-laden aircraft, Tanker 134, was assisting with fire suppression efforts when the crash occurred near Peak View, northeast of Cooma. All three crew members were killed.

Crash of a Grumman S-2 Tracker in Générac: 1 killed

Date & Time: Aug 2, 2019 at 1730 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
F-ZBAA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Nîmes - Nîmes
MSN:
456
YOM:
1958
Flight number:
Pélican 22
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The pilot, sole on board, departed Nîmes-Garons Airbase on a fire fighting mission near Générac, a village located about 6 km southwest of the airbase. While approaching the fire zone at low height, the twin engine airplane struck trees and crashed in a huge explosion. The aircraft was destroyed by impact forces and a post crash fire and the pilot was killed. At the time of the accident, the visibility was reduced due to thick smoke.

Crash of a Lockheed SP-2H Neptune in Fresno

Date & Time: Jun 15, 2014 at 2044 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N4692A
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Porterville - Porterville
MSN:
726-7247
YOM:
1958
Flight number:
Tanker 48
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
14410
Captain / Total hours on type:
2010.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
5100
Copilot / Total hours on type:
2650
Aircraft flight hours:
10484
Circumstances:
The captain reported that, while returning to the departure airport following an uneventful aerial drop, he noticed that the hydraulic pressure gauge indicated 0. The first officer subsequently verified that the sight gauge for the main hydraulic fluid reservoir was empty. The flight crew began performing the emergency gear extension checklist and verified that the nosewheel landing gear was extended. The captain stated that the first officer then installed the pin in the nosewheel landing gear as part of the emergency checklist. As the flight crewmembers diverted to a nearby airport because it had a longer runway and emergency resources, they briefed the no-flap landing. The first officer extended the main landing gear using the emergency gear release, which resulted in three down-and-locked landing gear indications. Subsequently, the airplane landed normally; however, during the landing roll, the nosewheel landing gear collapsed, and the airplane then came to rest nose low. Postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that the nosewheel landing gear pin was disengaged from the nosewheel jury strut, and the pin was not located. The disengagement of the pin allowed the nosewheel landing gear to collapse on landing. It could not be determined when or how the pin became disengaged from the jury strut. Installation of the pin would have required the first officer to maneuver in a small area and install the pin while the nose landing gear door was open and the gear extended. Further, the pin had a red flag attached to it. When inserted during flight, the flag encounters a high amount of airflow that causes it to vibrate; this could have resulted in the pin becoming disengaged after it was installed. Evidence of a hydraulic fluid leak was observed around the right engine cowling drain. The right engine hydraulic pump case was found cracked, and the backup ring was partially extruded, which is consistent with hydraulic system overpressurization. The reason for the overpressurization of the hydraulic system could not be determined during postaccident examination.
Probable cause:
The collapse of the nosewheel landing gear due to the disengagement of the nosewheel landing gear pin. Contributing to the accident was the failure of the main hydraulic system due to overpressurization for reasons that could not be determined during postaccident examination of the airplane.
Final Report:

Crash of a Canadair CL-415 in Moosehead Lake

Date & Time: Jul 3, 2013 at 1415 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FIZU
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Wabush - Wabush
MSN:
2076
YOM:
2010
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
12500
Captain / Total hours on type:
120.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
1700
Copilot / Total hours on type:
138
Aircraft flight hours:
461
Circumstances:
On 03 July 2013, at about 1415 Atlantic Daylight Time, the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador Air Services Division Bombardier CL-415 amphibious aircraft (registration C-FIZU, serial number 2076), operating as Tanker 286, departed Wabush, Newfoundland and Labrador, to fight a nearby forest fire. Shortly after departure, Tanker 286 touched down on Moosehead Lake to scoop a load of water. About 40 seconds later, the captain initiated a left-hand turn and almost immediately lost control of the aircraft. The aircraft water-looped and came to rest upright but partially submerged. The flight crew exited the aircraft and remained on the top of the wing until rescued by boat. There was an insufficient forward impact force to activate the onboard 406-megahertz emergency locator transmitter. There were no injuries to the 2 crew members. The aircraft was destroyed. The accident occurred during daylight hours.
Probable cause:
Findings as to causes and contributing factors:
- It is likely that the PROBES AUTO/MANUAL switch was inadvertently moved from the AUTO to the MANUAL selection when the centre pedestal cover was removed.
- The PROBES AUTO/MANUAL switch position check was not included on the Newfoundland and Labrador Government Air Services CL-415 checklist.
- The flight crew was occupied with other flight activities during the scooping run and did not notice that the water quantity exceeded the predetermined limit until after the tanks had filled to capacity.
- The flight crew decided to continue the take-off with the aircraft in an overweight condition.
- The extended period with the probes deployed on the water resulted in a longer take-off run, and the pilot flying decided to alter the departure path to the left.
- The left float contacted the surface of the lake during initiation of the left turn. Aircraft control was lost and resulted in collision with the water.
Findings as to risk:
- If safety equipment is installed in a manner that hampers its access and removal, then there is an increased risk that occupants may not be able to retrieve the safety equipment in a timely manner to ensure their survival.
- If individuals are not trained on safety equipment installed on the aircraft, then there is an increased risk that the individuals may not be aware of how to effectively use the equipment.
- If a checklist does not include a critical item, and flight crews are expected to rely on their memory, then there is a risk that that item will be missed, which could jeopardize the safety of flight.
- If flight crews do not adhere to standard operating procedures, then there is a risk that errors and omissions can be introduced, which could jeopardize the safety of flight.
- If a person is not restrained during flight and the aircraft either makes an abrupt manoeuvre or loses control, then that person is at a much greater risk of injury or death.
- If an overweight take-off is carried out, there may be an adverse effect on the aircraft’s performance, which could jeopardize the safety of flight.
- If companies do not have procedures for recording overweight take-offs and flight crews do not report them, then the overall condition of the aircraft’s structures will not be accurately known, which could jeopardize the safety of flight.
- If organizations do not use formal and documented processes to manage operational risks, there is an increased risk that hazards will not be identified and mitigated.
- If organizations do not have measures in place to raise awareness of the potential impact of stress on performance or to promote the early recognition and mitigation of stress, then there is an increased risk that errors will occur when an individual is affected by stress that has become chronic.
Other findings:
- Utilizing the locking position of the PROBES AUTO/MANUAL switch for the MANUAL selection allows the switch to be inadvertently moved from the AUTO to the MANUAL position.
Final Report:

Crash of a Lockheed C-130H Hercules near Edgemont: 4 killed

Date & Time: Jul 1, 2012 at 1738 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
93-1458
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Colorado Springs - Colorado Springs
MSN:
5363
YOM:
1994
Crew on board:
6
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total hours on type:
1966.00
Copilot / Total hours on type:
3647
Circumstances:
On 1 July 2012, at approximately 1738 Local time, a C-130H3, Tail Number 93-1458, assigned to the 145th Airlift Wing, North Carolina Air National Guard, Charlotte Douglas International Airport (KCLT), Charlotte, North Carolina, crashed on public land managed by the United States Forest Service (USFS), while conducting wildland firefighting operations near Edgemont, South Dakota. At the time of the mishap all members of the Mishap Crew (MC) were assigned or attached to the 156th Airlift Squadron, based at KCLT. The Mishap Crew (MC) consisted of Mishap Pilot 1 (MP1), Mishap Pilot 2 (MP2), Mishap Navigator (MN), Mishap Flight Engineer (ME), Mishap Loadmaster 1 (ML1) and Mishap Loadmaster 2 (ML2). For the mishap sortie, MP1 was the aircraft commander and pilot flying in the left seat. MP2 was in the right seat as the instructor pilot. MN occupied the navigator station on the right side of the flight deck behind MP2. ME was seated in the flight engineer seat located between MP1 and MP2, immediately aft of the center flight console. ML1 and ML2 were seated on the Modular Airborne Fire Fighting System (MAFFS) unit, near the right paratroop door. ML1 occupied the aft MAFFS control station seat and ML2 occupied the forward MAFFS observer station seat. MP1, MP2, MN and ME died in the mishap. ML1 and ML2 survived the mishap, but suffered significant injuries. The mishap aircraft (MA) and a USFS-owned MAFFS unit were destroyed. The monetary loss is valued at $43,453,295, which includes an estimated $150,000 in post aircraft removal and site environmental cleanup costs. There were no additional fatalities, injuries or damage to other government or civilian property.
Probable cause:
The accident investigation report released by the Air Force Air Mobility Command said:
I developed my opinion by inspecting the mishap site and wreckage, as well as analyzing factual data from the following: historical records, Air Force directives and guidance, USFS and Interagency guidance, reconstructing the mishap sortie in a C-130H3 simulator, engineering analysis, witness testimony, flight data, weather radar data, computer animated reconstruction, consulting with subject matter experts and information provided by technical experts. The failure of the Digital Flight Data Recorder severely complicated the recreation of the mishap, and impacted my ability to determine facts in this investigation. I find by clear and convincing evidence the cause of the mishap was MPl, MP2, MN and ME's inadequate assessment of operational conditions, resulting in the MA impacting the ground after flying into a microburst. Additionally, I find by the preponderance of evidence, the failure of the White Draw Fire Lead Plane aircrew and Air Attack aircrew to communicate critical operational information; and conflicting operational guidance concerning thunderstorm avoidance, substantially contributed to the mishap.
Final Report:

Crash of a Lockheed P2V-7 Neptune near Modena: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jun 3, 2012 at 1347 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N14447
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Cedar City - Cedar City
MSN:
826-8010
YOM:
1959
Flight number:
Tanker 11
Location:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
6145
Captain / Total hours on type:
1850.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
4288
Copilot / Total hours on type:
38
Aircraft flight hours:
12313
Circumstances:
The airplane collided with mountainous terrain while conducting firefighting operations, 20 miles north of Modena, Utah. The airplane was operated by Neptune Aviation Services under contract with the US Forest Service as an exclusive public-use fixed-wing airtanker service contract conducted under the operational control of the Bureau of Land management (BLM). Both pilots were fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and post crash fire. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a company flight plan had been filed. The flight originated in Cedar City, Utah, at 1315. The crew of Tanker 11 consisted of the pilot, copilot, and crew chief. They were based out of Missoula, MT, and had been together as a crew for the previous 3 weeks. Normally, the crews stay together for the entire fire season. Tanker 11 crew had operated out of Reno for the 2 weeks prior to the accident. During fire drop operations the tanker is manned by the pilot and copilot, while the crew chief remains at the fire base as ground personnel. The day before the accident while en route from Reno to Cedar City they performed one retardant drop on the White Rock fire, then landed at Cedar City. The crew departed the Cedar City tanker base and arrived at their hotel in Cedar City around 2230. The following morning, the day of the accident, the crew met at 0815, and rode into the Cedar City tanker base together. Tanker 11 took off at 1214 on its first drop on the White Rock fire, and returned at 1254. The crew shut down the airplane, reloaded the airplane with retardant, and did not take on any fuel. Tanker 11 departed the tanker base at 1307 to conduct its second retardant drop of the day, which was to be in the same location as the first drop. Upon arriving in the Fire Traffic Area (FTA) Tanker 11 followed the lead airplane, a Beech Kingair 90, into the drop zone. The drop zone was located in a shallow valley that was 0.4 miles wide and 350 feet deep. The lead airplane flew a shallow right-hand turn on to final, then dropped to an altitude of 150 feet above the valley floor over the intended drop area. While making the right turn on to final behind the lead plane, Tanker 11's right wing tip collided with terrain that was about 700 feet left of the lead airplane's flight path, which resulted in a rapid right yaw, followed by impact with terrain; a fire ball subsequently erupted. Tanker 11 created a 1,088-foot-long debris field and post impact fire.
Probable cause:
The flight crew's misjudgment of terrain clearance while maneuvering for an aerial application run, which resulted in controlled flight into terrain. Contributing to the accident was the flight crew's failure to follow the lead airplane's track and to effectively compensate for the tailwind condition while maneuvering.
Final Report:

Crash of a Convair CV-580 near Lytton: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jul 31, 2010 at 2024 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
C-FKFY
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Kamloops - Kamloops
MSN:
129
YOM:
1953
Flight number:
Tanker448
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
17000
Captain / Total hours on type:
900.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
5200
Copilot / Total hours on type:
34
Circumstances:
Crew was fighting a forest fire near Siwash Road, about 15 km south of Lytton. The bombing run required crossing the edge of a ravine in the side of the Fraser River canyon before descending on the fire located in the ravine. About 22 minutes after departure, Tanker 448 approached the ravine and struck trees. An unanticipated retardant drop occurred coincident with the tree strikes. Seconds later, Tanker 448 entered a left-hand spin and collided with terrain. A post-impact explosion and fire consumed much of the wreckage. A signal was not received from the on-board emergency locator transmitter; nor was it recovered. Both crew members were fatally injured.
Probable cause:
Findings as to Causes and Contributing Factors:
1. It could not be determined to what extent the initial collision with trees caused damage to the aircraft which may have affected its controllability.
2. Visual illusion may have precluded recognition, or an accurate assessment, of the flight path profile in sufficient time to avoid the trees on rising terrain.
3. Visual illusion may have contributed to the development of a low energy condition which impaired the aircraft performance when overshoot action was initiated.
4. The aircraft entered an aerodynamic stall and spin from which recovery was not possible at such a low altitude.
Findings as to Risk:
1. Visual illusions give false impressions or misconceptions of actual conditions. Unrecognized and uncorrected spatial disorientation, caused by illusions, carries a high risk of incident or accident.
2. Flight operations outside the approved weight and balance envelope increase the risk of unanticipated aircraft behaviour.
3. The recommended maintenance check of the emergency drop (E-drop) system may not be performed and there is no requirement for flight crews to test the E-drop system, thereby increasing the risk that an unserviceable system will go undetected.
4. The location of the E-drop selector requires crews to divert significant time and attention to identify and confirm the correct switch before operating it. This increases the risk of collision with terrain while attention is distracted.
5. The location of the angle-of-attack indicator on the instrument panel makes it difficult to see from the right seat, reducing its effectiveness.
6. When cockpit recordings are not available to an investigation, this may preclude the identification and communication of safety deficiencies to advance transportation safety.
Final Report:

Crash of a PZL-Mielec AN-2R near Voznesenskoye

Date & Time: Jun 27, 2010 at 1545 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
RA-62631
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
1G178-23
YOM:
1978
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2643
Captain / Total hours on type:
2643.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
645
Copilot / Total hours on type:
645
Aircraft flight hours:
3208
Circumstances:
The crew was performing a survey flight while in a fire fighting program. In flight, the engine failed and the crew elected to make an emergency landing. The aircraft stalled and crashed in the Varnavka River. Both pilots and the passenger were injured while the aircraft sank and was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
The accident was the result of a forced landing on the water surface due to unstable operation of the engine after a loss of power which was caused by the re-enrichment of the fuel-air mixture because of jamming of the needle valve of the left float chamber of the carburetor. The most probable reason for jamming of the needle valve of the left float chamber is its clogging by foreign particles that resulted from failure to comply with section 2.02.01.20 of the rules of maintenance of the AN-2 while performing 100-hour maintenance works due to lack of RTO requirements for mandatory compliance.
Final Report: