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Crash of a Quest Kodiak 100 near Moab: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 12, 2016 at 0537 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N772RT
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Moab – Green River – Salt Lake City
MSN:
100-0140
YOM:
2015
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
4635
Captain / Total hours on type:
243.00
Aircraft flight hours:
504
Circumstances:
The commercial pilot was departing on a routine positioning flight in dark night visual meteorological conditions. Footage from a security camera at the airport showed the airplane
take off normally and initiate a right turn, which was the established direction of traffic for the takeoff runway. The airplane continued the right turn, then entered an increasingly rapid descent and subsequently impacted terrain about 1 mile southwest from the airport. The wreckage distribution was consistent with a high-energy impact. Examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of any preimpact mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. Autopsy and toxicology testing of the pilot did not reveal any evidence of impairment or incapacitation. Visual conditions prevailed in the area at the time of the accident; however, the setting Moon was obscured by cloud cover, and the airport was located in an area of remote, sparsely-populated high desert terrain. This would have resulted in few visual references to which the pilot could have oriented the airplane. Although the pilot had experience operating in this environment in night conditions and held an instrument rating, the circumstances of the accident are consistent with the known effects of spatial disorientation. The investigation could not determine the initiating event which led to the pilot's mismatch between the airplane's perceived and actual attitude; however, he likely experienced a sensory illusion as a result of spatial disorientation, which led to a loss of control.
Probable cause:
The pilot's loss of control shortly after takeoff due to spatial disorientation.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft King Air 100 in Moab: 10 killed

Date & Time: Aug 22, 2008 at 1750 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N601PC
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Moab - Cedar City
MSN:
B-225
YOM:
1975
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
9
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
10
Captain / Total flying hours:
1818
Captain / Total hours on type:
698.00
Aircraft flight hours:
9263
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft, owned by the Red Canyon Aesthetics & Medical Spa, a dermatology clinic headquartered in Cedar City, was returning to its base when shortly after take off, the pilot elected to make an emergency landing due to technical problem. The aircraft hit the ground, skidded for 300 meters and came to rest in flames in the desert, near the Arches National Park. All ten occupants, among them some cancer specialist who had traveled to Moab early that day to provide cancer screening, cancer treatment, and other medical services to citizens in Moab, were killed.
Probable cause:
The pilot’s failure to maintain terrain clearance during takeoff for undetermined reasons.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-42 Cheyenne III in Grand Junction: 3 killed

Date & Time: Oct 31, 1992 at 0815 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N250TJ
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Moab - Grand Junction
MSN:
42-8001024
YOM:
1980
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
4700
Aircraft flight hours:
4784
Circumstances:
The commuter air carrier departed Moab, Utah, and flew to Grand Junction, CO, via rnav direct Macks intersection. After crossing macks intersection, the airplane turned right but instead of intercepting the localizer course, the airplane continued on a slightly divergent track to the east of the localizer. The pilot told control tower personnel, 'I'm showing twelve miles out on the ILS...getting real...erroneous signal, here. Any complaints?' the pilot was advised no difficulty reports had been received. The airplane impacted a mesa one minute later about five miles to the left of the localizer course. The cockpit was destroyed and no meaningful information was obtained from the navigational radios. All of the airport's navigational aids were later flight checked and no discrepancies were found. Although Vmc prevailed at the airport, the accident site was above the reported ceiling height. All three occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
Improper ifr procedure and resultant disorientation which resulted in a collision with terrain.
Final Report: