Crash of a Cessna 402B in St Petersburg

Date & Time: Oct 18, 2017 at 1545 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N900CR
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Miami - Tallahassee
MSN:
402B-1356
YOM:
1978
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
622
Circumstances:
The aircraft was substantially damaged during a forced landing to a street in St. Petersburg, Florida. The commercial pilot, one passenger, and two motorists sustained minor injuries. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time, and a visual flight rules flight plan was filed for flight that departed Tampa International Airport (TPA), Tampa, Florida, at 1526. The flight was destined for the Sarasota/Bradenton International Airport (SRQ), Sarasota, Florida. The flight was operated by Noble Air Charter under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135. According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, about 13 minutes after departure the pilot advised the Tampa air traffic control tower that he was "fuel critical" and requested vectors for the nearest airport. The TPA tower controller provided a heading toward the Albert Whitted Airport (SPG), St. Petersburg, Florida, located about 7 miles away. The pilot reported that he had 20 minutes of fuel on board. At 1543, the pilot was given a vector to runway 4, which was at his 12 o'clock and 4 miles away. The pilot reported the airport in sight, and the TPA tower controller provided the SPG tower frequency. There were no further radio transmissions. The airplane landed on a residential street about 2 miles from SPG, and collided with two motor vehicles. Examination of the airplane by an FAA inspector revealed substantial damage to both wings, the horizontal stabilizer, elevator, and nose section. Both wingtips and wing tip fuel tanks were separated from the wings. The left wing tip fuel tank exhibited minor sooting and heat damage. The left engine fuel selector was found in the left main fuel tank position, the right engine fuel selector was in the right main fuel tank position. According to charter records obtained from the operator, the accident occurred during the third leg of a four-leg trip. The records indicated that at the start of the trip, the airplane's hour meter read 589.0 hours. At the accident scene, it read 592.6 hours.According to FAA airman records, the pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single and multiengine land, and instrument airplane. His most recent first class medical certificate was issued on November 16, 2016. According to his logbook, the pilot had accrued 622 total hours of flight experience.

Crash of a Cessna 421B Golden Eagle II near Stráž pod Ralskem: 2 killed

Date & Time: Sep 26, 2017 at 0740 LT
Operator:
Registration:
OK-TKF
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
MSN:
421B-0931
YOM:
1975
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
While completing a regional flight from Příbram Airport, the twin engine aircraft went out of control and crashed in flames in a wooded area located near Stráž pod Ralskem. The aircraft was destroyed by a post crash fire and both occupants were killed. Development will follow.

Crash of a Learjet 25B in Toluca: 2 killed

Date & Time: May 17, 2017 at 1526 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
XA-VMC
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Toluca - Durango
MSN:
25-114
YOM:
1973
Location:
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
Less than one minute after takeoff from runway 15 at Toluca-Licendiado Adolfo López Mateos Airport, while climbing, the twin engine airplane went out of control and crashed in flames in a wasteland located about 200 meters past the runway end. The aircraft was destroyed upon impact and a fire erupted. Both crew members were killed.

Crash of a Learjet 35A in Teterboro: 2 killed

Date & Time: May 15, 2017 at 1529 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N452DA
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Philadelphia - Teterboro
MSN:
35A-452
YOM:
1981
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
6898
Captain / Total hours on type:
353.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
1167
Copilot / Total hours on type:
407
Circumstances:
On May 15, 2017, about 1529 eastern daylight time, a Learjet 35A, N452DA, departed controlled flight while on a circling approach to runway 1 at Teterboro Airport (TEB), Teterboro, New Jersey, and impacted a commercial building and parking lot. The pilot-in-command (PIC) and the second-in-command (SIC) died; no one on the ground was injured. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and postcrash fire. The airplane was registered to A&C Big Sky Aviation, LLC, and was operated by Trans-Pacific Air Charter, LLC, under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a positioning flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight departed from Philadelphia International Airport (PHL), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, about 1504 and was destined for TEB. The accident occurred on the flight crew’s third and final scheduled flight of the day; the crew had previously flown from TEB to Laurence G. Hanscom Field (BED), Bedford, Massachusetts, and then from BED to PHL. The PIC checked the weather before departing TEB about 0732; however, he did not check the weather again before the flight from PHL to TEB despite a company policy requiring that weather information be obtained within 3 hours of departure. Further, the crew filed a flight plan for the accident flight that included altitude (27,000 ft) and time en route (28 minutes) entries that were incompatible with each other, which suggests that the crew devoted little attention to preflight planning. The crew also had limited time in flight to plan and brief the approach, as required by company policy, and did not conduct an approach briefing before attempting to land at TEB. Cockpit voice recorder data indicated that the SIC was the pilot flying (PF) from PHL to TEB, despite a company policy prohibiting the SIC from acting as PF based on his level of experience. Although the accident flight waslikely not the first time that the SIC acted as PF (based on comments made during the flight), the PIC regularly coached the SIC (primarily on checklist initiation and airplane control) from before takeoff to the final seconds of the flight. The extensive coaching likely distracted the PIC from his duties as PIC and pilot monitoring, such as executing checklists and entering approach waypoints into the flight management system. Collectively, procedural deviations and errors resulted in the flight crew’s lack of situational awareness throughout the flight and approach to TEB. Because neither pilot realized that the airplane’s navigation equipment had not been properly set for the instrument approach clearance that the flight crew received, the crew improperly executed the vertical profile of the approach, crossing an intermediate fix and the final approach fix hundreds of feet above the altitudes specified by the approach procedure. The controller had vectored the flight for the instrument landing system runway 6 approach, circle to runway 1. When the crew initiated the circle-to-land maneuver, the airplane was 2.8 nautical miles (nm) beyond the final approach fix (about 1 mile from the runway 6 threshold) and could not be maneuvered to line up with the landing runway, which should have prompted the crew to execute a go-around because the flight did not meet the company’s stabilized approach criteria. However, neither pilot called for a go-around, and the PIC (who had assumed control of the airplane at this point in the flight) continued the approach by initiating a turn to align with the landing runway. Radar data indicated that the airplane’s airspeed was below the approach speed required by company standard operating procedures (SOPs). During the turn, the airplane stalled and crashed about 1/2 nm south of the runway 1 threshold.
Probable cause:
The National Transportation Safety Board determines that the probable cause of this accident was the pilot-in-command’s (PIC) attempt to salvage an unstabilized visual approach, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall at low altitude. Contributing to the accident was the PIC’s decision to allow an unapproved second-in-command to act as pilot flying, the PIC’s inadequate and incomplete preflight planning, and the flight crew’s lack of an approach briefing. Also contributing to the accident were Trans-Pacific Jets’ lack of safety programs that would have enabled the company to identify and correct patterns of poor performance and procedural noncompliance and the Federal Aviation Administration’s ineffective Safety assurance System procedures, which failed to identify these company oversight deficiencies.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-42-720 Cheyenne III in Sorocaba: 2 killed

Date & Time: Mar 31, 2017 at 1442 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
PP-EPB
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Manaus - Sorocaba
MSN:
42-8001035
YOM:
1980
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The crew was completing a flight from Manaus to Sorocaba, apparently transferring the airplane for maintenance purposes. On final approach, the aircraft hit trees and crashed in a wooded area located few dozen yards from the runway 18 threshold. The aircraft was destroyed and both occupants were killed.

Crash of a Cessna 525C CitationJet CJ4 in Howell

Date & Time: Jan 16, 2017 at 1159 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N525PZ
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Batavia – Howell
MSN:
525C-0196
YOM:
2015
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
5800
Captain / Total hours on type:
320.00
Aircraft flight hours:
320
Circumstances:
The aircraft collided with the terrain following a loss of control on landing at the Livingston County Airport (OZW), Howell, Michigan. The private pilot received serious injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged by impact forces and a post impact fire. The airplane was registered to and operated by Zeliff Aviation, Inc., under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed near the accident site and the flight was operated on an instrument flight rules flight plan. The flight originated from the Genessee County Airport (GCQ), Batavia, New York at 1057. The pilot reported that prior to the flight he checked the weather and Notices to Airmen (NOTAMs) on the Aviation Digital Data Services Meteorological Terminal Aviation Routine Weather Reports (ADD METAR) website. When preparing for the Instrument Landing System (ILS) runway 13 approach at OZW, the pilot listened to the Automated Terminal Information Service (ATIS) and he used the airplane's flight management system (FMS) to determine the landing performance data. The pilot stated the Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD) was showing rain in the area, but the onboard radar was not. He did not encounter any precipitation once he descended below the clouds. He then canceled his flight plan and continued the approach. The pilot stated he knew there was a possibility of there being ice on the runway, as the weather conditions were favorable for ice. He stated he decided to continue the approach making sure he was accurately flying the approach speeds and that he did not land long on the runway. He stated he was prepared to go-around if the runway was icy. In addition, he saw an airplane holding short on a taxiway at the end of the runway, which appeared to be waiting for him to land so that it could depart, and this led him to believe the runway condition was good. The pilot did not use the common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF) to inquire about the runway conditions. The pilot stated that upon touchdown, he applied the speed brakes and spoilers. Once the nose wheel touched down, he applied the brakes and realized he had no braking action. He retracted the speed brakes, spoilers and flaps and applied takeoff power. The airplane yawed to the left,so he reduced the power to idle and applied right rudder to correct the airplane's heading. The airplane continued off the runway where it contacted a fence, a ditch, and crossed a road prior to coming to rest. The pilot next recalled the airplane came to rest with him hanging upside down by the seat belt. He crawled out of the airplane and noticed the wings had separated. The lineman who was working in the fixed base operator reported hearing the pilot announce that he was on the ILS approach and then again that he was on short final. He stated the airplane touched down prior to the taxiway A-2 turnoff, and he asked the pilot if he knew where he was going to park. He walked outside and noticed the airplane was near the east end of the runway. He recalled hearing the engine power increase followed by the impact and black smoke. The airplane that was sitting at the end of the runway was being taxied to a maintenance shop and was not going to takeoff. The pilot and mechanic in the airplane stated they saw the airplane during its approach which looked "normal." They stated the taxiways were icy and there was mist/light rain in the area. Another witness who saw the accident and assisted the pilot following the accident, stated the roads were covered with ice and "very slick." This witness stated that the sleet and freezing rain had started about an hour before the accident. The aircraft recording system (AReS II) data from the airplane was downloaded. The data showed the airplane was ½ mile from the runway at 200 ft above ground level at an airspeed of 110 knots, and that the airplane touched down near the approach end of the runway prior to veering to the left. After touching down, the throttles were advanced for a period of about 15 seconds, reduced, then advanced momentarily once again. The Model 525C landing performance data charts show that at a weight of 14,500 lbs, a landing reference speed (Vref) of 108 KIAS, and with no wind, the landing distance on a wet icy runway would have been about 13,625 ft. The length of runway 13 was 5,002 ft. A NOTAM had not been issued regarding the icy runway conditions at OZW. The airport manager stated he was not at the airport at the time of the accident, and that he was still trying to learn the new digital NOTAM manager system. The employee who was at the airport was authorized to issue NOTAMs, but had not yet been trained on the new system. Subsequent to the accident, the airport manager reported that the employees have been trained on inspecting runway conditions and issuing NOTAMs.

Crash of a Piper PA-31-310 Navajo C in Zielona Góra: 1 killed

Date & Time: Nov 24, 2016 at 1200 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
D-IFBU
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
MSN:
31T-8012050
YOM:
1980
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
9418
Aircraft flight hours:
7371
Aircraft flight cycles:
6641
Circumstances:
Just after liftoff, while in initial climb, the aircraft nosed down and hit the grassy runway surface. Upon impact, the nose was destroyed and both engines were sheared off. The aircraft came to rest on its belly and was partially destroyed. The pilot, who was performing a positioning flight to Germany to pick up passengers, was killed.
Probable cause:
The pilot mistakenly retracted the undercarriage at rotation. There was no immediate decision of the pilot to abandon the takeoff procedure when both propellers contacted the runway surface.
Final Report:

Crash of a Socata TBM-900 in Fairoaks

Date & Time: Oct 15, 2016 at 0835 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
M-VNTR
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Douglas - Fairoaks
MSN:
1097
YOM:
2016
Location:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The crew was performing a positioning flight to Fairoaks from Douglas (Isle of Man) to pick up a passenger. After landing, the single engine aircraft failed to stop properly, overran, went through a soft ground, lost its undercarriage and came to rest 100 yards past the runway end. Both crew members were slightly injured while the aircraft was seriously damaged. Brand new, it was delivered last September.

Crash of a Cessna 550 Citation II in Charallave: 2 killed

Date & Time: Aug 16, 2016 at 1540 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
YV3051
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Charallave - Barinas
MSN:
550-0071
YOM:
1979
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from runway 10 in Charallave-Óscar Machado Zuloaga Airport, while in initial climb, the aircraft banked to the right, lost altitude and eventually crashed in a huge explosion in a dense wooded area located down below the airfield. The aircraft was totally destroyed by impact forces and a post crash fire and both crew members were killed.

Crash of a Cessna 207 Stationair 7 in Goodnews Bay

Date & Time: Jun 17, 2016 at 1200 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N91170
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Bethel – Goodnews Bay
MSN:
207-00101
YOM:
1969
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
1150
Captain / Total hours on type:
78.00
Aircraft flight hours:
15089
Circumstances:
During cruise flight through an area of mountainous terrain, the commercial pilot became geographically disoriented and selected the incorrect route through the mountains. Upon realizing it was the incorrect route, he initiated a steep climb while executing a 180° turn. During the steep climbing turn, the airplane inadvertently entered instrument meteorological conditions, and the airplane subsequently impacted an area of rocky, rising terrain. The pilot reported there were no mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to select the correct route through the mountains as a result of geographic disorientation, and his subsequent visual flight into instrument meteorological conditions, which resulted in collision with terrain.
Final Report: