Crash of a Cessna 560 Citation Encore into the Atlantic Ocean: 1 killed

Date & Time: May 24, 2019 at 1800 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N832R
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Saint Louis - Fort Lauderdale
MSN:
560-0585
YOM:
2001
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
While approaching the destination, the airplane continue over the Atlantic Ocean and all communications with the pilot were interrupted for about an hour. Two F-15' were dispatched to intercept the aircraft that entered a dive and crashed into the Atlantic Ocean about 500 km east of Fort Lauderdale. The pilot did not survive.

Crash of a Piper PA-31T Cheyenne into the Atlantic Ocean: 5 killed

Date & Time: Oct 25, 2018 at 1119 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N555PM
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Andrews - Governor's Harbour
MSN:
31T-7620028
YOM:
1976
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
2778
Aircraft flight hours:
7718
Circumstances:
On October 25, 2018, at about 1119 eastern daylight time, and about 100 miles southeast of Charleston, South Carolina (CHS), radar contact was lost with a Piper PA-31T, N555PM. The airplane was presumed to have impacted the Atlantic Ocean. The commercial pilot and four passengers were not found and presumed fatally injured. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight, which departed from a private airport in Andrews, South Carolina about 1047, bound for Governor's Harbor airport, Bahamas (MYEM). The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The pilot's family reported that the airplane departed from its home base, a private runway in Andrews, South Carolina. Preliminary radar and air traffic control data from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) showed the airplane departed the area toward the southeast about, 1047. The airplane crossed over the coastline and began a climb to an assigned altitude of 25,000 feet. The climb rate was consistent at 500 feet per minute (fpm), and the airplane remained on course flying toward the assigned airspace fix, named LURKS. When the airplane was about 12 miles from LURKS (about 95 miles southeast of CHS), while climbing through 24,300 feet, the pilot made a garbled radio transmission indicating that he was diverting to CHS. The airplane began a descent at about 1,000 fpm and maintained a course towards LURKS. About 23 seconds later, after several air traffic control requests to repeat the radio transmission, the pilot replied, "we're descending". About 15 seconds later, at an altitude of about 23,500 feet, the airplane turned sharply toward the left, and the descent rate increased to greater than 4,000 fpm. About 25 seconds later, the radar data altitude parameter went invalid, the last reported altitude was 21,500 feet. About 35 seconds later, the pilot transmitted "emergency emergency, five five five papa mike", and no further transmissions were recorded. About 25 seconds later, the last radar position (32.3184N 78.0661W) was recorded at 1119, which was about 3 miles to the left (northeast) of the airplane's original course towards LURKS. That position corresponded to a location about 100 nautical miles east southeast of CHS. The FAA issued an Alert Notice (ALNOT) and a search effort was conducted by the U.S. Coast Guard. One of the search airplanes reported an oil sheen on the surface of the water near the last known coordinates; however, neither the airplane nor debris were located. The search effort was cancelled on October 27 at sunset. A review of the airplane maintenance logbooks revealed that the most recent annual inspection was performed on September 5, 2018, and at that time the airframe had accrued a total of 7,718 hours. That inspection included routine maintenance, the replacement of the starter generators on both engines, replacement of the cabin oxygen bottle, and compliance with several airworthiness directive inspections, including AD 2017-02-06, which addresses a potential issue with electrical wiring arcing and fire risk. According to FAA airman records the pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single and multi-engine land, rotorcraft-helicopter, and instrument airplane. His most recent medical certificate was issued on March 8, 2018, at which time he reported a total of 2,778 hours of total flight experience. A preliminary review of weather records revealed that there were no convective or precipitation echoes in the area at the time of the accident. Satellite imagery depicted a mid-level layer of clouds in the area with tops estimated at 15,500 feet. An Airmen's Meteorological Information advisory for moderate turbulence was in effect for the region. Atmospheric model results characterized the atmosphere as stable, with a freezing level around 13,000 feet and a shallow layer favorable for light rime icing at 23,000 feet.

Crash of a Grumman G-64 into the Atlantic Ocean

Date & Time: Aug 25, 2018
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N1955G
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Elizabeth City - Elizabeth City
MSN:
G-406
YOM:
1954
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The crew departed Elizabeth City CGAS in North Carolina in a mission to deploy weather buoys in the Atlantic Ocean. While taking off, the seaplane struck something floating on water and came to rest some 425 miles east off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. All five crew members evacuated the cabin and were later recovered by the crew of a container vessel. The aircraft sank and was lost.

Crash of a BAe 125-700B off Dakar: 7 killed

Date & Time: Sep 5, 2015 at 1812 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
6V-AIM
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Ouagadougou - Dakar
MSN:
257062
YOM:
1979
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
7
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft left Ouagadougou Airport at the end of the afternoon on an ambulance flight to Dakar-Léopold Sédar Senghor Airport with one patient, one doctor, two nurses and three crew members. For unknown reason, the aircraft continued its route over the Atlantic Ocean and eventually crashed into the sea some 111 km west of Dakar at 1812LT. One week after the accident, the wreckage was not localized and no trace of the aircraft nor the seven occupants was found. There were on board three Senegalese, two Congolese, one Algerian and one French citizen, the patient. About one week after the accident, the National Agency for Civil Aviation and Meteorology (ANACIM) of Senegal mentioned that the accident may have been caused by a collision near the VOR of Tambacounda with a Ceiba Intercontinental Boeing 737-800 registered 3C-LLY. En route from Dakar to Cotonou, the 737 was cruising at FL350 when the collision occurred. For unknown reason, the crew of the 737 changed his route and continued to Malabo instead of landing on the nearest airport according to Senegalese Authorities. As Tambacounda is located more than 600 km east of the presumed crash site, the question is asked about the exact circumstances of a possible inflight collision. On September 18, following investigation from the French BEA, it was confirmed in a written report transmitted by the Ceiba Captain that the collision occurred at FL340 and that he did not sea the HS125 prior to the accident and after the collision. He decided to divert to Malabo where a ground control of the B737 was performed. It is believed that the damages were very limited. Development will follow.

Crash of a Grumman E-2C Hawkeye in Atlantic Ocean: 3 killed

Date & Time: Aug 15, 2007 at 2300 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
163697
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
MSN:
A137
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
The Hawkeye was based on the USS Harry S. Truman cruising in Atlantic Ocean. Shortly after take off, the aircraft crashed into the sea, 240 km off Virginia. All three occupants were killed.

Crash of a Boeing 767-366ER in the Atlantic Ocean: 217 killed

Date & Time: Oct 31, 1999 at 0152 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
SU-GAP
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Los Angeles – New York – Cairo
MSN:
24542
YOM:
1989
Flight number:
MS990
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
15
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
202
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
217
Captain / Total flying hours:
14384
Captain / Total hours on type:
6356.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
12538
Copilot / Total hours on type:
5191
Aircraft flight hours:
33354
Aircraft flight cycles:
7594
Circumstances:
EgyptAir Flight 990 departed Los Angeles International Airport, destined for Cairo, with a scheduled intermediate stop at New York-JFK. The aircraft landed at JFK about 23:48 EDT and arrived at the gate about 00:10 EDT. Two designated flight crews (each crew consisting of a captain and first officer) boarded the aircraft at JFK. The aircraft taxied to runway 22R and was cleared for takeoff at 01:19. Shortly after liftoff, the pilots of EgyptAir flight 990 contacted New York Terminal Radar Approach (and departure) Control (TRACON). New York TRACON issued a series of climb instructions and, at 01:26, instructed the flight to climb to FL230 and contact New York Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC). At 01:35, New York ARTCC instructed EgyptAir flight 990 to climb to FL330 and proceed directly to DOVEY intersection. About 01:40 the relief first officer suggested that he relieve the command first officer at the controls. The command first officer agreed and left the flightdeck. The airplane leveled at FL330 four minutes later. At 01:48, the command captain decided to go to the toilet and left the flightdeck. At 01:48:30, about 11 seconds after the captain left the cockpit, the CVR recorded an unintelligible comment. Ten seconds later, the relief first officer stated quietly, "I rely on God." There were no sounds or events recorded by the flight recorders that would indicate that an airplane anomaly or other unusual circumstance preceded the relief first officer's statement. At 01:49:18, the CVR recorded the sound of an electric seat motor and 27 seconds later the autopilot was disconnected. At 01:49:48, the relief first officer again stated quietly, "I rely on God." At 01:49:53, the throttle levers were moved from their cruise power setting to idle, and, one second later, the FDR recorded an abrupt nose-down elevator movement and a very slight movement of the inboard ailerons. Subsequently, the airplane began to rapidly pitch nose down and descend. Between 0149:57 and 0150:05, the relief first officer quietly repeated, "I rely on God," seven additional times. During this time, as a result of the nose-down elevator movement, the airplane's load factor decreased from about 1 to about 0.2 G (almost weightlessness). Then the elevators started moving further in the nose-down direction. Immediately thereafter the captain entered the flightdeck and asked loudly, "What's happening? What's happening?". As he airplane's load factor reached negative G loads (about -0.2 G) the relief first officer stated for the tenth time, "I rely on God." At 01:50:08, as the airplane exceeded its maximum operating airspeed (0.86 Mach), a master warning alarm began to sound and the relief first officer stated quietly for the eleventh and final time, "I rely on God," and the captain repeated his question, "What's happening?" At 0150:15, as the airplane was descending through about 27,300 feet the airplane's rate of descent began to decrease. About 6 seconds later the left and right elevator surfaces began to move in opposite directions. The engine start lever switches for both engines then moved from the run to the cutoff position. At 01:50:24 the throttle levers started to move from their idle position to full throttle, and the speedbrake handle moved to its fully deployed position. The captain again asked "What is this? What is this? Did you shut the engine(s)?" At 01:50:26, the captain stated, "Get away in the engines ... shut the engines". The relief first officer replied "It's shut". Between 01:50:31 and 01:50:37, the captain repeatedly stated, "Pull with me." However, the elevator surfaces remained in a split condition (with the left surface commanding nose up and the right surface commanding nose down) until the FDR and CVR stopped recording. at 0150:36.64 and 0150:38.47, respectively. The height estimates based on primary radar data from the joint use FAA/U.S. Air Force (USAF) radar sites indicated that the airplane's descent stopped about 01:50:38 and that the airplane subsequently climbed to about 25,000 feet msl and changed heading from 80º to 140º before it started a second descent, which continued until the airplane impacted the ocean.
Probable cause:
The National Transportation Safety Board determines that the probable cause of the EgyptAir flight 990 accident is the airplane's departure from normal cruise flight and subsequent impact with the Atlantic Ocean as a result of the relief first officer's flight control inputs. The reason for the relief first officer's actions was not determined.
Final Report:

Crash of a Rockwell Grand Commander 680 in the Atlantic Ocean: 1 killed

Date & Time: Apr 9, 1998
Operator:
Registration:
4X-CCS
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
MSN:
680-1731-138
YOM:
1968
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The pilot, sole on board, departed Southend on a ferry flight to Canada with an intermediate stop in Greenland. En route, he reported to ATC severe icing conditions. Shortly later, the aircraft entered an uncontrolled descent and crashed in the Atlantic Ocean about 167 km southeast of the Greenland coast. The pilot was killed.

Crash of a Lockheed C-141B Starlifter in Atlantic Ocean: 9 killed

Date & Time: Sep 13, 1997 at 1710 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
65-9405
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Windhoek - Georgetown - McGuire AFB
MSN:
6142
YOM:
1965
Flight number:
REACH4201
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
9
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
9
Aircraft flight hours:
36430
Circumstances:
Some 65 nautical miles west off the Namibian coast, a US Air Force Lockheed C-141B Starlifter collided with a German Air Force Tupolev 154M in mid-air. Both aircraft crashed, killing all 33 occupants. The Tupolev 154M (11+02), call sign GAF074, operated on a flight from Cologne/Bonn Airport in Germany to Kaapstad, South Africa. En route refueling stops were planned at Niamey, Niger and Windhoek, Namibia. On board were ten crew members and 14 passengers. The C-141B, (65-9405), call sign REACH 4201, had delivered UN humanitarian supplies to Windhoek and was returning to the U.S. via Georgetown on Ascension Island in the South Atlantic Ocean. On board were nine crew members. GAF074 departed Niamey, Niger at 10:35 UTC. REACH 4201 took off from Windhoek at 14:11 UTC and climbed to its filed for and assigned cruise level of 35,000 feet (FL350). At the same time, GAF074 was not at its filed for cruise level of FL390 but was still at its initially assigned cruise level FL350. Windhoek ATC was in sole and continuous radio contact with REACH 4201, with no knowledge of GAF 074's movement. Luanda ATC was in radio contact with GAF074, but they were not in radio contact with REACH 4201. Luanda ATC did receive flight plans for both aircraft but a departure message for only REACH 4201. At 15:10 UTC both aircraft collided at FL350 and crashed into the sea.
Probable cause:
The primary cause of this accident, in my opinion, was GAF 074 flying a cruise level (FL350) which was not the level they had filed for (FL390). Neither FL350 nor FL390 were the correct cruise levels for that aircraft's magnetic heading according to International Civil Aviation Organization regulations. The appropriate cruise level would have been FL290, FL330, FL370, FL410, etc. A substantially contributing factor was ATC agency Luanda's poor management of air traffic through its airspace. While ATC communications could be improved, ATC agency û Luanda did have all the pertinent information it needed to provide critical advisories to both aircraft. If ATC agency Luanda was unable to contact GAF 074, it should have used other communication means (HF radio, telefax or telephone) to contact REACH 4201 through ATC agency Windhoek, as outlined in governing documents. Another substantially contributing factor was the complicated and sporadic operation of the Aeronautical Fixed Telecommunications Network (AFTN). Routing of messages to affected air traffic control agencies is not direct and is convoluted, creating unnecessary delays and unfortunate misroutings. Specifically, ATC agency Windhoek did not receive a flight plan or a departure message on GAF 074, which could have been used by the controllers to identify the conflict so they could have advised REACH 4201. In my opinion, the absence of TCAS was not a cause or substantially contributing factor, but the presence of a fully operational TCAS could have prevented the accident." (William H.C. Schell, jr., Colonel, USAF President, Accident Investigation Board).

Crash of a Tupolev TU-154M in the Atlantic Ocean: 24 killed

Date & Time: Sep 13, 1997 at 1710 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
11+02
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Bonn – Niamey – Windhoek – Cape Town
MSN:
89A813
YOM:
1989
Flight number:
GAF074
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
10
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
14
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
24
Circumstances:
Some 65 nautical miles west off the Namibian coast, a US Air Force Lockheed C-141B Starlifter collided with a German Air Force Tupolev 154M in mid-air. Both aircraft crashed, killing all 33 occupants. The Tupolev 154M (11+02), call sign GAF074, operated on a flight from Cologne/Bonn Airport in Germany to Kaapstad, South Africa. En route refueling stops were planned at Niamey, Niger and Windhoek, Namibia. On board were ten crew members and 14 passengers. The C-141B, (65-9405), call sign REACH 4201, had delivered UN humanitarian supplies to Windhoek and was returning to the U.S. via Georgetown on Ascension Island in the South Atlantic Ocean. On board were nine crew members. GAF074 departed Niamey, Niger at 10:35 UTC. REACH 4201 took off from Windhoek at 14:11 UTC and climbed to its filed for and assigned cruise level of 35,000 feet (FL350). At the same time, GAF074 was not at its filed for cruise level of FL390 but was still at its initially assigned cruise level FL350. Windhoek ATC was in sole and continuous radio contact with REACH 4201, with no knowledge of GAF 074's movement. Luanda ATC was in radio contact with GAF074, but they were not in radio contact with REACH 4201. Luanda ATC did receive flight plans for both aircraft but a departure message for only REACH 4201. At 15:10 UTC both aircraft collided at FL350 and crashed into the sea.
Probable cause:
The primary cause of this accident, in my opinion, was GAF 074 flying a cruise level (FL350) which was not the level they had filed for (FL390). Neither FL350 nor FL390 were the correct cruise levels for that aircraft's magnetic heading according to International Civil Aviation Organization regulations. The appropriate cruise level would have been FL290, FL330, FL370, FL410, etc. A substantially contributing factor was ATC agency Luanda's poor management of air traffic through its airspace. While ATC communications could be improved, ATC agency Luanda did have all the pertinent information it needed to provide critical advisories to both aircraft. If ATC agency Luanda was unable to contact GAF 074, it should have used other communication means (HF radio, telefax or telephone) to contact REACH 4201 through ATC agency Windhoek, as outlined in governing documents. Another substantially contributing factor was the complicated and sporadic operation of the Aeronautical Fixed Telecommunications Network (AFTN). Routing of messages to affected air traffic control agencies is not direct and is convoluted, creating unnecessary delays and unfortunate misroutings. Specifically, ATC agency Windhoek did not receive a flight plan or a departure message on GAF 074, which could have been used by the controllers to identify the conflict so they could have advised REACH 4201. In my opinion, the absence of TCAS was not a cause or substantially contributing factor, but the presence of a fully operational TCAS could have prevented the accident." (William H.C. Schell, jr., Colonel, USAF President, Accident Investigation Board).

Crash of a Beechcraft 65 Queen Air in the Atlantic Ocean

Date & Time: Jul 24, 1997 at 1620 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N816Q
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Kendall-Tamiami – Kingston
MSN:
LC-38
YOM:
1960
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
1785
Captain / Total hours on type:
21.00
Aircraft flight hours:
4300
Circumstances:
About 1 hour after departure and 15 minutes after reaching the cruising altitude of 9,000 feet, the left engine quit. The flight crew feathered the left propeller and turned toward the closest
airport which was 80 miles away. The aircraft would not maintain altitude and entered a 500 foot per minute descent. About 20 minutes after engine failure the aircraft was ditched in the ocean about 50 miles from the closest airport. The flight crew and passengers were rescued the following morning and the aircraft was not recovered. The second pilot and owner of the aircraft stated the aircraft was about 90 pounds over the maximum allowable weight at the time of departure. The previous owner of the aircraft stated that both engines had exceeded the recommended overhaul time by about 450 flight hours.
Probable cause:
Failure of the aircraft to maintain altitude for undetermined reasons following loss of power in one engine.
Final Report: