Crash of a Grumman G-64 into the Atlantic Ocean

Date & Time: Aug 25, 2018
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N1955G
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Elizabeth City - Elizabeth City
MSN:
G-406
YOM:
1954
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The crew departed Elizabeth City CGAS in North Carolina in a mission to deploy weather buoys in the Atlantic Ocean. While taking off, the seaplane struck something floating on water and came to rest some 425 miles east off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. All five crew members evacuated the cabin and were later recovered by the crew of a container vessel. The aircraft sank and was lost.

Crash of a Grumman G-64 Albatross in Fort Pierce

Date & Time: Nov 5, 2009 at 1534 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N120FB
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Fort Pierce - Okeechobee
MSN:
G-331
YOM:
1953
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
9095
Captain / Total hours on type:
14.00
Aircraft flight hours:
3747
Circumstances:
The pilot stated that during the landing gear retraction he heard a loud bang, followed by three to four smaller bangs. The first officer confirmed that the left engine was the affected engine and immediately began feathering the propeller. Once the propeller had beenfeathered, the captain confirmed the action by looking outside and noticing the propeller in the feathered position. The captain further reported that the right engine was producing the maximum power available and was indicating 55 inches of manifold pressure. Unable to achieve airspeed of greater than 95 to 96 knots indicated, the captain attempted to return to the airport for an emergency landing; however, he was unable to maintain altitude and attempted to land on an airport perimeter road, impacting the airport fence and a sand berm in the process. A cursory examination of the engine and system components revealed no evidence of a preimpact mechanical malfunction.
Probable cause:
A total loss of left engine power and subsequent failure of the airplane to maintain airspeed and altitude on the remaining engine for undetermined reasons.
Final Report:

Crash of a Grumman G-64 Albatross near Mazunte: 1 killed

Date & Time: Aug 10, 2004
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
XB-JHH
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
G-32
YOM:
1950
Location:
Country:
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
It is believed that the aircraft was engaged in an illegal mission and was tracked by Mexican Authorities. It crashed in unknown circumstances on the beach of La Ventanilla near Mazunte. A crew member was killed while two others escaped.

Crash of a Grumman G-64 Albatross in Fort Pierce: 2 killed

Date & Time: Sep 25, 2003 at 1126 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N70258
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Fort Pierce - Fort Pierce
MSN:
G-418
YOM:
1955
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
13000
Captain / Total hours on type:
450.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
12800
Aircraft flight hours:
4276
Circumstances:
According to the pilot, during climb-out from runway 09 at an altitude of approximately 500 feet the right engine warning red magnetic chip detector light illuminated. The pilot decided to shut down the right engine and return to the airport. Shortly after making that decision the left engine began to lose power. The airplane was unable to maintain altitude, and the pilot prepared to make an off-airport emergency landing in a field. The airplane collided with the trees as the pilot maneuvered for the emergency landing. Examination of the airframe, and flight controls revealed no anomalies. Examination of the left and right engine revealed no mechanical anomalies. Examination of cockpit fuel selector controls revealed that the left engine fuel selector handle was in the off position and the right engine fuel selector handle was set in the left tank position. During the in-flight engine secure procedures the pilot is required to place the inoperative engine fuel selector in the off position.
Probable cause:
A loss of engine power due to the pilot placing the fuel selector in the off position which resulted in fuel starvation to the left engine, after the pilot intentionally shut down the right engine.
Final Report:

Crash of a Grumman G-64 Albatross in Chetumal: 3 killed

Date & Time: Apr 14, 2003 at 1830 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N7026Y
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Tulum - Chetumal
MSN:
G-394
YOM:
1954
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Circumstances:
The seaplane departed Tulum on a flight to Chetumal with three people on board. On approach to Chetumal Airport in good weather conditions, the pilot was cleared to land on runway 10 and initiated a left turn when control was slot. The aircraft rolled to the left, lost height and crashed 6 km short of the runway, bursting into flames. All three occupants were killed.

Crash of a Grumman G-64 Albatross in the Pacific Ocean

Date & Time: Jun 18, 1991 at 1910 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N7029C
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Santa Barbara – Kahului
MSN:
G-288
YOM:
1953
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
During cruise flight the accident aircraft lost oil pressure in the n°2 engine. Flight could not be sustained using the remaining engine. According to the pilot, the remaining engine would overheat when power was applied. The crew descended to just above the water and tried to fly the aircraft in ground effect, but to no avail. They elected to ditch the aircraft. During the landing, the aircraft received substantial damage and was almost immediately flooded, causing the aircraft to sink. The crew escaped, but did not have time to retrieve emergency gear. They were rescued after about 20 hours in the water. Evidence revealed that the pilot did not have a pilot's certificate. No evidence could be found to indicate that the pilot had any experience in the accident aircraft or with any sea plane. Since the aircraft sank, a cause for the engine problems could not be determined.
Probable cause:
Improper touchdown in the water causing substantial damage. Loss of power on the n°2 engine and the pilot's lack of qualifications were factors in the accident.
Final Report: