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Crash of a Raytheon 390 Premier I in South Bend: 2 killed

Date & Time: Mar 17, 2013 at 1623 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N26DK
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Tulsa - South Bend
MSN:
RB-226
YOM:
2008
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
613
Captain / Total hours on type:
171.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
1877
Copilot / Total hours on type:
0
Aircraft flight hours:
457
Circumstances:
According to the cockpit voice recorder (CVR), during cruise flight, the unqualified pilot-rated passenger was manipulating the aircraft controls, including the engine controls, under the supervision and direction of the private pilot. After receiving a descent clearance to 3,000 feet mean sea level (msl), the pilot told the pilot-rated passenger to reduce engine power to maintain a target airspeed. The cockpit area microphone subsequently recorded the sound of both engines spooling down. The pilot recognized that the pilot-rated passenger had shutdown both engines after he retarded the engine throttles past the flight idle stops into the fuel cutoff position. Specifically, the pilot stated "you went back behind the stops and we lost power." According to air traffic control (ATC) radar track data, at the time of the dual engine shutdown, the airplane was located about 18 miles southwest of the destination airport and was descending through 6,700 feet msl. The pilot reported to the controller that the airplane had experienced a dual loss of engine power, declared an emergency, and requested radar vectors to the destination airport. As the flight approached the destination airport, the cockpit area microphone recorded a sound similar to an engine starter spooling up; however, engine power was not restored during the attempted restart. A review of the remaining CVR audio did not reveal any evidence of another attempt to restart an engine. The CVR stopped recording while the airplane was still airborne, with both engines still inoperative, while on an extended base leg to the runway. Subsequently, the controller told the pilot to go-around because the main landing gear was not extended. The accident airplane was then observed to climb and enter a right traffic pattern to make another landing approach. Witness accounts indicated that only the nose landing gear was extended during the second landing approach. The witnesses observed the airplane bounce several times on the runway before it ultimately entered a climbing right turn. The airplane was then observed to enter a nose low, rolling descent into a nearby residential community. The postaccident examinations and testing did not reveal any anomalies or failures that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane. Although the CVR did not record a successful engine restart, the pilot was able to initiate a go-around during the initial landing attempt, which implies that he was able to restart at least one engine during the initial approach. The investigation subsequently determined that only the left engine was operating at impact. Following an engine start, procedures require that the respective generator be reset to reestablish electrical power to the Essential Bus. If the Essential Bus had been restored, all aircraft systems would have operated normally. However, the battery toggle switch was observed in the Standby position at the accident site, which would have prevented the Essential Bus from receiving power regardless of whether the generator had been reset. As such, the airplane was likely operating on the Standby Bus, which would preclude the normal extension of the landing gear. However, the investigation determined that the landing gear alternate extension handle was partially extended. The observed position of the handle would have precluded the main landing gear from extending (only the nose landing gear would extend). The investigation determined that it is likely the pilot did not fully extend the handle to obtain a full landing gear deployment. Had he fully extended the landing gear, a successful single-engine landing could have been accomplished. In conclusion, the private pilot's decision to allow the unqualified pilot-rated passenger to manipulate the airplane controls directly resulted in the inadvertent dual engine shutdown during cruise descent. Additionally, the pilot's inadequate response to the emergency, including his failure to adhere to procedures, resulted in his inability to fully restore airplane systems and ultimately resulted in a loss of airplane control.
Probable cause:
The private pilot's inadequate response to the dual engine shutdown during cruise descent, including his failure to adhere to procedures, which ultimately resulted in his failure to
maintain airplane control during a single-engine go-around. An additional cause was the pilot's decision to allow the unqualified pilot-rated passenger to manipulate the airplane controls, which directly resulted in the inadvertent dual engine shutdown.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 303 Crusader in South Bend: 5 killed

Date & Time: Nov 13, 2006 at 2003 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N611BB
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
South Bend-Ankeny
MSN:
303-00145
YOM:
1982
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
504
Aircraft flight hours:
4577
Circumstances:

The aircraft was carrying 5 people (4 businessmen and a pilot) from South Bend, Indiana, to Ankeny, Iowa. Few minutes after takeoff, while flying at 5,700 feet, the aircraft spiraled down to about 1,200 feet and crash in a vertically position. Nobody survived.

Crash of a Canadair CL-600 Challenger in Montrose: 3 killed

Date & Time: Nov 28, 2004 at 0955 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N873G
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Montrose-South Bend
MSN:
3009
YOM:
1983
Flight number:
GLB73
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
12396
Captain / Total hours on type:
913.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
1586
Copilot / Total hours on type:
30
Aircraft flight hours:
14317
Aircraft flight cycles:
8910
Circumstances:
Aircraft stalled on takeoff and hit a fence before crashing at the end of runway 31. Both pilots and a passenger were killed. NTSB concluded that crew forgot to deice before departure.

Crash of a Pilatus PC-12 in Missouri: 2 killed

Date & Time: Sep 14, 2002 at 1555 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N451ES
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Lake Ozark-South Bend
MSN:
0425
YOM:
2001
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
1645
Captain / Total hours on type:
58.00
Aircraft flight hours:
505
Aircraft flight cycles:
470

Crash of a Beechcraft Super King Air 200 in Chicago: 3 killed

Date & Time: Nov 11, 1999 at 2020 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N869
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Chicago-South Bend
MSN:
BB-0174
YOM:
1976
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
18000
Captain / Total hours on type:
4536.00
Aircraft flight hours:
8636

Crash of a Cessna 401 in Caldwell

Date & Time: Oct 2, 1999 at 0751 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N88VA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Caldwell-South Bend
MSN:
401-0118
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
738
Captain / Total hours on type:
118.00
Aircraft flight hours:
4686

Crash of a Beechcraft E18S near Argos: 1 killed

Date & Time: Apr 1, 1975 at 0130 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N140J
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Indianapolis - South Bend
MSN:
BA-334
YOM:
1958
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
7000
Captain / Total hours on type:
5000.00
Circumstances:
While in cruising altitude on a cargo flight from Indianapolis to South Bend, the pilot contacted ATC and reported a fire in the cabin. He reduced his altitude when few minutes later, the twin engine airplane struck tree tops and crashed in flames in a wooded area located in the region of Argos. The airplane was destroyed and the pilot, sole on board, was killed.
Probable cause:
In-flight fire for undetermined reason. The following findings were reported:
- Fire in cabin, cockpit, baggage compartment,
- High obstructions.
Final Report:

Crash of a Douglas DC-3-201F in Chicago

Date & Time: Jul 2, 1946 at 0910 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
NC28383
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Chicago – South Bend
MSN:
4091
YOM:
1941
Flight number:
TW456
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
18
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2559
Captain / Total hours on type:
2261.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
2939
Copilot / Total hours on type:
381
Aircraft flight hours:
14043
Circumstances:
After takeoff, while climbing to a height of some 600 feet, the left engine failed. The crew informed ATC about the situation and obtained the permission to return for an emergency landing. While trying to restart the left engine, the right engine failed as well. The aircraft stalled and crashed on a railway road located few hundred yards from the runway threshold. While the aircraft was damaged beyond repair, all 21 occupants were evacuated with minor injuries.
Probable cause:
The probable cause of this accident was the complete loss of power in both engines due to fuel starvation necessitating an emergency landing in an unfavorable area. The cause for fuel starvation of the engines has not been determined.
Final Report: