Zone

Crash of an IAI 1124 Westwind in Sundance: 2 killed

Date & Time: Mar 18, 2019 at 1537 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N4MH
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Panama City - Sundance
MSN:
232
YOM:
1978
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The aircraft impacted terrain near the east side of runway 18 at Sundance Airport (HSD), Yukon, Oklahoma. As the airplane approached the approach end of runway 18, it began to climb, rolled left, and became inverted before impacting terrain. The airplane was destroyed. Both pilots sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by Sundance Airport FBO LLC under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight was operating on an instrument rules flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight departed from Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport (ECP), Panama City, Florida and was destined to HSD. The airplane was located about 1,472 feet down and 209 feet east of runway 18. The landing gear and wing flaps were extended. The left thrust reverser was unlatched and open and the right thrust reverser was closed and latched. The airplane was equipped with a cockpit voice recorder (CVR); however, the accident flight was not recorded. The audio on the CVR indicated the last events recorded were from 2007.

Crash of a Swearingen SA227AC Metro III near Pebble City: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 5, 2016 at 2222 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N765FA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Panama City – Albany
MSN:
AC-765
YOM:
1990
Flight number:
LYM308
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
8451
Captain / Total hours on type:
4670.00
Aircraft flight hours:
24233
Circumstances:
The airline transport pilot delayed his scheduled departure for the night cargo flight due to thunderstorms along the route. Before departing, the pilot explained to the flight follower assigned to the flight that if he could not get though the thunderstorms along the planned route, he would divert to the alternate airport. While en route, the pilot was advised by the air traffic controller in contact with the flight of a "ragged line of moderate, heavy, and extreme" precipitation along his planned route. The controller also stated that he did not see any breaks in the weather. The controller cleared the pilot to descend at his discretion from 7,000 ft mean sea level (msl) to 3,000 ft msl, and subsequently, the controller suggested a diversion to the northeast for about 70 nautical miles that would avoid the most severe weather. The pilot responded that he had enough fuel for such a diversion but concluded that he would "see what the radar is painting" after descending to 3,000 ft msl. About 1 minute 30 seconds later, as the airplane was descending through 7,000 ft msl, the controller stated, "I just lost you on radar, I don't show a transponder, it might have to do with the weather." About 40 seconds later, the pilot advised the controller that he intended to deviate to the right of course, and the controller told the pilot that he could turn left and right as needed. Shortly thereafter, the pilot stated that he was going to turn around and proceed to his alternate airport. The controller cleared the pilot direct to his alternate and instructed him to maintain 3,000 ft msl. The pilot acknowledged the instruction, and the controller then stated, "do you want to climb back up? I can offer you any altitude." The pilot responded that he would try to climb back to 3,000 ft msl. The controller then recommended a heading of 180° to "get you clear of the weather quicker," and the pilot responded, "alright 180." There were no further communications from the pilot. Shortly thereafter, radar data showed the airplane enter a right turn that continued through about 540°. During the turn its airspeed varied between 198 and 130 knots, while its estimated bank angles were between 40 and 50°. Examination of the wreckage indicated that airplane experienced an in-flight breakup at relatively low altitude, consistent with radar data that showed the airplane's last recorded altitudes to be around 3,500 ft msl. The symmetrical nature of the breakup, damage to the outboard wings, and damage to the upper fuselage were all signatures indicative that the left and right wings failed in positive overload almost simultaneously. All of the fracture surfaces examined had a dull, grainy appearance consistent with overstress separation. There was no evidence of pre-existing cracking noted at any of the separation points, nor was there evidence of any mechanical anomalies that would have prevented normal operation. Review of base reflectivity weather radar data showed that, while the pilot was maneuvering to divert to the alternate airport, the airplane was operating in an area of light precipitation that rapidly intensified to heavy precipitation, as shown by radar scans completed shortly after the accident. During this time, the flight was likely operating in clouds along the leading edge of the convective line, where the pilot most likely would have encountered updrafts and severe or greater turbulence. The low visibility conditions that existed during the flight, which was conducted at night and in instrument meteorological conditions, coupled with the turbulence the flight likely encountered, were conducive to the development of spatial disorientation. Additionally, the airplane's maneuvering during the final moments of the flight was consistent with a loss of control due to spatial disorientation. The pilot's continued flight into known convective weather conditions and his delayed decision to divert the flight directly contributed to the accident. Although the operator had a system safety-based program, the responsibility for the safe outcome of the flight was left solely to the pilot. Written company policy required completion of a flight risk assessment tool (FRAT) before each flight by the assigned flight follower; however, a FRAT was not completed for the accident flight. The flight followers responsible for completing the FRATs were not trained to complete them for night cargo flights, and the operator's management was not aware that the FRATs were not being completed for night cargo flights. Further, if a FRAT had been completed for the accident flight, the resultant score would have allowed the flight to commence into known hazardous weather conditions without any further review. If greater oversight had been provided by the operator, it is possible that the flight may have been cancelled or re-routed due to the severity of the convective weather conditions present along the planned route of flight.
Probable cause:
The pilot's decision to initiate and continue the flight into known adverse weather conditions, which resulted spatial disorientation, a loss of airplane control, and a subsequent in-flight breakup.
Final Report:

Crash of a De Havilland Dash-8-202 in Acandí: 4 killed

Date & Time: Oct 5, 2013 at 0100 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N356PH
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Panama City - Panama City
MSN:
502
YOM:
1997
Location:
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
The crew was engaged in an anti narcotic flight over Colombia when aircraft crashed in unknown circumstances in the region of Acandí, Province of Chocó. The four passengers were killed while both pilots were injured. Crew consisted of five US citizens and one Panamanian. Aircraft left Balboa AFB at Panama City in the evening.

Crash of a Britten-Norman BN-2A-21 Islander on Perico Island

Date & Time: Jul 19, 2013 at 1234 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
HP-1338MF
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Isla del Rey - Panama City
MSN:
818
YOM:
1977
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
7
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Few minutes after he left Isla del Rey Airport, while overflying the bay of Panama City, pilot informed ATC about engin problems. Unable to reach the Panama City-Marcos A. Gelabert Airport, pilot reduced his altitude and elected to make an emergency landing on Perico Island, some 10 km south of Panama City Airport. After touch down, aircraft went out of control and collided with a container. All eight occupants were uninjured while the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Fokker F27 in Panama City

Date & Time: Oct 31, 2007 at 1540 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
HP-1541PST
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Panama City-Bocas del Toro
MSN:
10297
YOM:
1966
Country:
Crew on board:
4
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
9
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:

The aircraft stalled after rotation and sunk back on runway. It overrun the terrain by 400 metres and came to rest. All occupants escaped ininjured but the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a BAe Jetstream 31 in Bocas del Toro

Date & Time: Jun 1, 2006 at 0755 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
HP-1477PS
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Panama City-Bocas del Toro
MSN:
760
YOM:
1985
Flight number:
PST680
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
16
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The commuter aircraft landed in heavy rain falls. It overran the runway and came to rest in a marshy field. All occupants escaped uninjured but the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a McDonnell Douglas MD-82 in Machiques: 160 killed

Date & Time: Aug 16, 2005 at 0300 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
HK-4374X
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Panama City - Fort-de-France
MSN:
49484
YOM:
1986
Flight number:
YH708
Location:
Country:
Crew on board:
8
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
152
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
160
Aircraft flight hours:
49494
Aircraft flight cycles:
24312
Circumstances:
While flying over western province of Zulia, Venezuela, crew reported engine problem. He tried to divert to Caracas but the remaining engine also failed few minutes later. The aircraft crashed in a mountainous terrain in the Sierra de Perija, killing all 160 people on board. It is the worst accident involving a MD-82 at this date. Both engines stopped due to icing. All 160 occupants were killed.

Crash of a Cessna 208 Caravan in Panama City, Panama

Date & Time: Aug 16, 2004 at 0835 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
HP-1397APP
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Panama City-Chitré
MSN:
208-0613
YOM:
1997
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Few minutes after takeoff, the crew encountered technical problem with the engine. An emergency landing was made on a road but the aircraft struck a tree and crashed. Nobody was injured but the aircraft was written off.

Crash of an IAI-1124 Westwind in Panama City, Panama: 7 killed

Date & Time: Jul 2, 2004 at 1338 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N280AT
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Quito-Panama City-Washington DC-Milan
MSN:
247
YOM:
1979
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
7
Circumstances:
The twinjet aircraft was performing an ambulance flight between Quito, Ecuador, and Milan, Italy, with fuel stops in Panama City and Washington DC with 2 crew, 2 medical doctors and 2 Italian patients on board. After takeoff from Panama City runway 03R, crew lost control of the aircraft which crashed into a former Evergreen International hangar. All occupants and one man on ground were killed.

Crash of a Piper PA-31 Navajo Chieftain in Colombia: 2 killed

Date & Time: Sep 12, 2003 at 1930 LT
Operator:
Registration:
XB-BAQ
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Medellin-Panama City
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:

Flying at night in VFR, the twin engine struck the side of a mountain near the city of Uraba. The aircraft left the airport of Medellin at 1700LT with a Mexican pilot and a Colombia passenger on board.