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Crash of an IAI 1124 Westwind in Sundance: 2 killed

Date & Time: Mar 18, 2019 at 1537 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N4MH
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Panama City - Sundance
MSN:
232
YOM:
1978
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The aircraft impacted terrain near the east side of runway 18 at Sundance Airport (HSD), Yukon, Oklahoma. As the airplane approached the approach end of runway 18, it began to climb, rolled left, and became inverted before impacting terrain. The airplane was destroyed. Both pilots sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by Sundance Airport FBO LLC under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight was operating on an instrument rules flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight departed from Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport (ECP), Panama City, Florida and was destined to HSD. The airplane was located about 1,472 feet down and 209 feet east of runway 18. The landing gear and wing flaps were extended. The left thrust reverser was unlatched and open and the right thrust reverser was closed and latched. The airplane was equipped with a cockpit voice recorder (CVR); however, the accident flight was not recorded. The audio on the CVR indicated the last events recorded were from 2007.

Crash of an Extra EA-400 in Ponca City: 5 killed

Date & Time: Aug 4, 2018 at 1045 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N13EP
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
MSN:
10
YOM:
2000
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:
The aircraft impacted terrain near Ponca City, Oklahoma. The private rated pilot and 4 passengers were all fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to Jeremiah 29:11 Inc., Independence, Kansas, and operated by a private individual under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight which operated without a flight plan. The flight originated from the Ponca City Municipal Airport (KPNC), Ponca City, Oklahoma, and was en route to Independence, Kansas. A witness saw the airplane depart KPNC on runway 17. He reported that the airplane was slow to climb as it departed to the south. He watched the airplane turn right and fly to the north. Another eyewitness reported the airplane impacted a soy bean field and a post impact fire ensued. All major airplane components were found at the accident site.

Crash of a Cessna 208B Grand Caravan in Verdigris

Date & Time: Mar 24, 2015 at 1507 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N106BZ
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Tulsa - Claremore
MSN:
288B-0106
YOM:
1988
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
6500
Captain / Total hours on type:
970.00
Aircraft flight hours:
11443
Circumstances:
The pilot reported that, during the postmaintenance test flight, the turboprop engine lost power. The airplane was unable to maintain altitude, and the pilot conducted a forced landing, during which the airplane was substantially damaged. The engine had about 9 total flight hours at the time of the accident. A teardown of the fuel pump revealed that the high-pressure drive gear teeth exhibited wear and that material was missing from them, whereas the driven gear exhibited little to no visible wear. A metallurgical examination of the gears revealed that the damaged drive gear was made of a material similar to 300-series stainless steel instead of the harder specified M50 steel, whereas the driven gear was made of a material similar to the specified M50 steel. Subsequent to these findings, the airplane manufacturer determined that the gear manufacturer allowed three set-up gears made from 300-series stainless steel to become part of the production inventory during the manufacturing process. One of those gears was installed in the fuel pump on the accident airplane, and the location of the two other gears could not be determined. Based on the evidence, it is likely that the nonconforming gear installed in the fuel pump failed because it was manufactured from a softer material than specified, which resulted in a loss of fuel flow to the engine and the subsequent loss of engine power. The manufacturer subsequently inspected its stock of gears and issued notices to customers that had engines with fuel pumps installed with the same part number gear set as the one installed on the accident airplane. The manufacturer also issued a service information letter and service bulletins regarding the fuel pump gear set for engines used in civilian and military applications. As of the date of this report, the two remaining gears have not been located.
Probable cause:
The fuel pump gear manufacturer’s allowance of set-up gears made from a nonconforming material to be put in the production inventory system, the installation of a nonconforming gear in the accident airplane’s production fuel pump, and the gear’s failure, which resulted in a loss of fuel flow to the engine and the subsequent loss of engine power.
Final Report:

Crash of a Mitsubishi MU-2B-25 Marquise in Owasso: 1 killed

Date & Time: Nov 10, 2013 at 1546 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N856JT
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Salina - Tulsa
MSN:
306
YOM:
1974
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
2874
Captain / Total hours on type:
12.00
Aircraft flight hours:
6581
Circumstances:
Radar and air traffic control communications indicated that the Mitsubishi MU-2B-25 was operating normally and flew a nominal flightpath from takeoff through the beginning of the approach until the airplane overshot the extended centerline of the landing runway, tracking to the east and left of course by about 0.2 nautical mile then briefly tracking back toward the centerline. The airplane then entered a 360-degree turn to the left, east of the centerline and at an altitude far below what would be expected for a nominal flightpath and intentional maneuvering flight given the airplane's distance from the airport, which was about 5 miles. As the airplane was in its sustained left turn tracking away from the airport, the controller queried the pilot, who stated that he had a "control problem" and subsequently stated he had a "left engine shutdown." This was the last communication received from the pilot. Witnesses saw the airplane spiral toward the ground and disappear from view. Examination of the wreckage revealed that the landing gear was in the extended position, the flaps were extended 20 degrees, and the left engine propeller blades were in the feathered position. Examination of the left engine showed the fuel shutoff valve was in the closed position, consistent with the engine being in an inoperative condition. As examined, the airplane was not configured in accordance with the airplane flight manual engine shutdown and single-engine landing procedures, which state that the airplane should remain in a clean configuration with flaps set to 5 degrees at the beginning of the final approach descent and the landing gear retracted until landing is assured. Thermal damage to the cockpit instrumentation precluded determining the preimpact position of fuel control and engine switches. The investigation found that the airplane was properly certified, equipped, and maintained in accordance with federal regulations and that the recovered airplane components showed no evidence of any preimpact structural, engine, or system failures. The investigation also determined that the pilot was properly certificated and qualified in accordance with applicable federal regulations, including Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) No. 108, which is required for MU-2B pilots and adequate for the operation of MU-2B series airplanes. The pilot had recently completed the SFAR No. 108 training in Kansas and was returning to Tulsa. At the time of the accident, he had about 12 hours total time in the airplane make and model, and the flight was the first time he operated the airplane as a solo pilot. The investigation found no evidence indicating any preexisting medical or behavioral conditions that might have adversely affected the pilot's performance on the day of the accident. Based on aircraft performance calculations, the airplane should have been flyable in a one engine-inoperative condition; the day visual meteorological conditions at the time of the accident do not support a loss of control due to spatial disorientation. Therefore, the available evidence indicates that the pilot did not appropriately manage a one-engine-inoperative condition, leading to a loss of control from which he did not recover. The airplane was not equipped, and was not required to be equipped, with any type of crash resistant recorder. Although radar data and air traffic control voice communications were available during the investigation to determine the airplane's altitude and flight path and estimate its motions (pitch, bank, yaw attitudes), the exact movements and trim state of the airplane are unknown, and other details of the airplane's performance (such as power settings) can only be estimated. In addition, because the airplane was not equipped with any type of recording device, the pilot's control and system inputs and other actions are unknown. The lack of available data significantly increased the difficulty of determining the specific causes that led to this accident, and it was not possible to determine the reasons for the left engine shutdown or evaluate the pilot's recognition of and response to an engine problem. Recorded video images from the accident flight would possibly have shown where the pilot's attention was directed during the reported problems, his interaction with the airplane controls and systems, and the status of many cockpit switches and instruments. Recorded flight data would have provided information about the engines' operating parameters and the airplane's motions. Previous NTSB recommendations have addressed the need for recording information on airplane types such as the one involved in this accident. Recorders can help investigators identify safety issues that might otherwise be undetectable, which is critical to the prevention of future accidents.
Probable cause:
The pilot's loss of airplane control during a known one-engine-inoperative condition. The reasons for the loss of control and engine shutdown could not be determined because the airplane was not equipped with a crash-resistant recorder and postaccident examination and testing did not reveal evidence of any malfunction that would have precluded normal operation.
Final Report:

Crash of a Rockwell Aero Commander 500B in Bartlesville

Date & Time: Jan 13, 2012 at 1930 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N524HW
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Kansas City - Cushing
MSN:
500-1533-191
YOM:
1965
Flight number:
CTL327
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
8487
Captain / Total hours on type:
3477.00
Circumstances:
The pilot was en route on a positioning flight when the airplane’s right engine surged and experienced a partial loss of power. He adjusted the power and fuel mixture controls; however, a few seconds later, the engine surged again. The pilot noted that the fuel flow gauge was below 90 pounds, so he turned the right fuel pump on. The pilot then felt a surge on the left engine, so he performed the same actions he as did for the right engine. He believed that he had some sort of fuel starvation problem. The pilot then turned to an alternate airport, at which time both engines lost total power. The airplane impacted trees and terrain about 1.5 miles from the airport. The left side fuel tank was breached during the accident; however, there was no indication of a fuel leak, and about a gallon of fuel was recovered from the airplane during the wreckage retrieval. The company’s route coordinator reported that prior to the accident flight, the pilot checked the fuel gauge and said the airplane had 120 gallons of fuel. A review of the airplane’s flight history revealed that, following the flight immediately before the accident flight, the airplane was left with approximately 50 gallons of fuel on board; there was no record of the airplane having been refueled after that flight. Another company pilot reported the airplane fuel gauge had a unique trait in that, after the airplane’s electrical power has been turned off, the gauge will rise 40 to 60 gallons before returning to zero. When the master switch was turned to the battery position during an examination of another airplane belonging to the operator, the fuel gauge indicated approximately 100 gallons of fuel; however, when the master switch was turned to the off position, the fuel quantity on the gauge rose to 120 gallons, before dropping off scale, past empty. Additionally, the fuel cap was removed and fuel could be seen in the tank, but there was no way to visually verify the quantity of fuel in the tank.
Probable cause:
The total loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion and the pilot’s inadequate preflight inspection, which did not correctly identify the airplane’s fuel quantity before departure.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 421A Golden I Eagle in Tulsa: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jul 10, 2010 at 2205 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N88DF
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Pontiac - Riverside
MSN:
421-0084
YOM:
1968
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
592
Captain / Total hours on type:
67.00
Aircraft flight hours:
640
Circumstances:
During the 3.5-hour flight preceding the accident flight, the airplane used about 156 gallons of the 196 gallons of usable fuel. After landing, the airplane was topped off with 156 gallons of fuel for the return flight. During the preflight inspection, a line serviceman at the fixed based operator observed the right main fuel tank sump become stuck in the open position. He estimated 5 to 6 gallons of fuel were lost before the sump seal was regained, but the exact amount of fuel lost could not be determined. The lost fuel was not replaced before the airplane departed. Data from an on board GPS unit indicate that the airplane flew the return leg at an altitude of about 4,500 feet mean sea level for about 4 hours. About 4 minutes after beginning the descent to the destination airport, the pilot requested to divert to a closer airport. The pilot was cleared for an approach to runway 18R at the new destination. While on approach to land, the pilot reported to the air traffic control tower controller, “we exhausted fuel.” The airplane descended and crashed into a forested area about 1/2 mile from the airport. Post accident examination of the right and left propellers noted no leading edge impact damage or signatures indicative of rotation at the time of impact. Examination of the airplane wreckage and engines found no malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. The pilot did not report any problems with the airplane or its fuel state before announcing the fuel was exhausted. His acceptance of the approach to runway 18R resulted in the airplane flying at least 1 mile further than if he had requested to land on runway 18L instead. If the pilot had declared an emergency and made an immediate approach to the closest runway when he realized the exhausted fuel state, he likely would have reached the airport. Toxicological testing revealed cyclobenzaprine and diphenhydramine in the pilot’s system at or above therapeutic levels. Both medications carry warnings that use may impair mental and/or physical abilities required for activities such as driving or operating heavy machinery. The airplane would have used about 186 gallons of fuel on the 4-hour return flight if the engines burned fuel at the same rate as the previous flight. The fuel lost during the preflight inspection and the additional 30 minutes of flight time on the return leg reduced the airplane’s usable fuel available to complete the planned flight, and the pilot likely did not recognize the low fuel state before the fuel was exhausted due to impairment by the medications he was taking.
Probable cause:
The pilot’s inadequate preflight fuel planning and management in-flight, which resulted in total loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s use of performance-impairing medications.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 500 Citation in Oklahoma City: 5 killed

Date & Time: Mar 4, 2008 at 1515 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N113SH
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Oklahoma City-Mankato
MSN:
500-0285
YOM:
1975
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:
Less than 2 minutes after take off, the aircraft crashed in a wooded area located 5 miles SE of Wiley Post airport. All 4 occupants were killed. The aircraft was outbound for Mankato, Minnesota. According to preliminary report, it seems that the aircraft collided with a flock of birds.

Crash of a Rockwell Aero Commander 500 in Tulsa: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jan 16, 2008 at 2243 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N712AT
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Tulsa - Oklahoma City
MSN:
500-1118-68
YOM:
1961
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
4373
Captain / Total hours on type:
695.00
Aircraft flight hours:
17888

Crash of a Rockwell Grand Commander 690 in Antlers: 4 killed

Date & Time: Oct 15, 2006 at 1303 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N55JS
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Oklahoma City-Orlando
MSN:
690-11195
YOM:
1974
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Captain / Total flying hours:
6450
Captain / Total hours on type:
150.00
Aircraft flight hours:
7943
Circumstances:

Less than one hour after takeoff from Oklahoma City-Wiley Post airport, the aircraft disappeared from radar screens and crashed in a wooded area located near Antlers, Oklahoma. All four occupants were killed. Weather conditions at the time of the accident were considered as bad with low visibility and heavy rain falls.

Crash of a Beechcraft Super King Air 200 in Tulsa

Date & Time: Dec 9, 2004 at 1831 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N6PE
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
La Crosse-Tulsa
MSN:
BB-0856
YOM:
1981
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2089
Captain / Total hours on type:
469.00
Aircraft flight hours:
3084
Circumstances:
On final approach, the twin engine aircraft crashed 5 km short of runway. The pilot was injured and the aircraft destroyed. One of the engine stopped during final approach due to fuel exhaustion