Country
code

Victoria

Crash of a Beechcraft Super King Air B200 in Melbourne: 5 killed

Date & Time: Feb 21, 2017 at 0859 LT
Registration:
VH-ZCR
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Melbourne - King Island
MSN:
BB-1544
YOM:
1996
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from Melbourne-Essendon Airport runway 17, while in initial climb, the pilot encountered technical problems and declared an emergency. The twin engine aircraft then banked left and crashed in flames onto a shopping mall located near the airport. The aircraft was destroyed upon impact and all five occupants have been killed. Apparently, an engine failed during initial climb, forcing the crew to return.

Crash of a Rockwell Aero Commander 500 in Clonbinane: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jul 31, 2007 at 2000 LT
Operator:
Registration:
VH-YJB
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Melbourne-Shepparton
MSN:
500-3299
YOM:
1977
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
2342
Captain / Total hours on type:
970.00
Aircraft flight hours:
4558
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft was performing a flight from Melbourne to Shepparton, Victoria State. In flight, the pilot lost control of the aircraft which crashed in a dense wooded area located near Clonbinane, 60 km north of Melbourne. Both occupants were killed.

Crash of a Piper PA-31 Navajo Chieftain in Mount Hotham: 3 killed

Date & Time: Jul 8, 2005 at 1725 LT
Operator:
Registration:
VH-OAO
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Melbourne-Mount Hotham
MSN:
31-8252021
YOM:
1982
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
4770
Captain / Total hours on type:
1269.00
Aircraft flight hours:
9137
Circumstances:

The twin engine aircraft was performing a special flight from Melbourne to Mount Hotham airfield, in the Victoria Alps. While descending in bad weather, the aircraft struck trees and crashed in a wooded area, 4 km south-east of airport. All occupants died. Among them was the Gold Coast multi-millionaire Brian Ray and his wife. The pilot accumulated 4,770 flying hours within 1,269 on PA-31.

Crash of a Piper PA-31 Cheyenne in Benalla: 6 killed

Date & Time: Jul 28, 2004 at 1048 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
VH-TNP
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Bankstown-Benalla
MSN:
31-7920026
YOM:
1979
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
6
Captain / Total flying hours:
14017
Captain / Total hours on type:
3100.00
Aircraft flight hours:
5496
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft was flying from Bankstown to Benalla with 5 pax and a pilot on board for D&R Henderson, a lumber company based in Sydney. On approach in low clouds and heavy rain, the aircraft struck a mountainous and wooded area located 34 km southeast of airport. All occupants were killed. The aircraft was destroyed by impact and post-impact fire.

Crash of a Mitsubishi MU-2 Marquise in Melbourne, Australia: 1 killed

Date & Time: Dec 21, 1994 at 0324 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
VH-IAM
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Sydney-Melbourne
MSN:
0517
YOM:
1970
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Captain / Total flying hours:
5000
Captain / Total hours on type:
150.00

Crash of a De Havilland DH.104 Dove 5 in Melbourne

Date & Time: Dec 3, 1993 at 2037 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-DHD
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
Yes
Site:
Schedule:
Melbourne - Melbourne
MSN:
04104
YOM:
1948
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
8
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
18154
Captain / Total hours on type:
1500.00
Aircraft flight hours:
21259
Circumstances:
The pilot had planned to conduct a night charter flight over Melbourne and Port Phillip Bay, starting from and returning to Essendon Airport. Dinner was to be served in flight. The pilot gave a safety briefing to the passengers before starting the engines. He completed engine runups and pre-takeoff checks, including selecting 20° of flap. At 2036 ESuT, in daylight, the pilot initiated takeoff on runway 17 using standard take-off power setting of 7.5 lb/in2 of boost and 3,000 RPM. Wind conditions were light and variable, visibility was about 10 km and the temperature was 19°C. The aircraft became airborne and, just as it achieved the take-off safety speed of 84 kts, at a height not above 50 ft, the right engine lost power. The aircraft yawed right. The pilot reported to the investigation team that he briefly noticed a reading of 3 lb of boost on the MAP gauge and assessed the problem as a possible partial right engine failure. He then selected the landing gear up but it did not retract. He cycled the landing gear selector once and the gear then retracted. By this time several seconds had elapsed and the airspeed had decayed to 76 kts. The pilot then assessed the airspeed as too low to retract the flaps and left them at 20°. The airspeed continued to decay until VMCA, 72 kts, was reached. When indicated airspeed had further decayed to 68 kts, the pilot reduced power on the left engine to avoid an uncontrollable roll to the right. He was able to maintain wings level and attempted to track the aircraft toward a street but was unable to maintain height. The aircraft collided with powerlines and then struck the roofs of several houses before coming to rest, on its left side, against the front wall of a house. About one minute had elapsed from initiation of takeoff until the accident. The pilot and all but one of the passengers remained conscious throughout the accident sequence. All occupants were evacuated, some without assistance and others with the assistance of the pilot, other passengers, emergency services personnel or bystanders.
Probable cause:
The following factors were reported:
- The right engine fuel control unit fuel pump failed causing the engine to fail at a critical phase of flight.
- Maintenance inspections did not detect the abnormal wear on the thrust face of the right engine fuel control unit fuel pump.
- The landing gear did not retract on the first attempt and aircraft performance decayed while the pilot resolved this problem.
- The pilot was probably forced to abandon the emergency procedures to concentrate on maintaining control of the aircraft.
- The aircraft was unable to maintain altitude and airspeed with the right propeller windmilling and 20° of flap.
- The investigation identified organisational factors concerning deficiencies in the manuals and procedures available to, and used by, the operator for the operation and maintenance of the accident aircraft.
Final Report:

Crash of a Boeing 707-368C off Woodside Beach: 5 killed

Date & Time: Oct 29, 1991 at 1147 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
A20-103
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Richmond - §Avalon
MSN:
21103
YOM:
1975
Flight number:
Windsor 380
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
5
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Circumstances:
The aircraft departed Richmond on a flight to Avalon, carrying five crew members. While cruising at an altitude of 5,000 feet along the coast, the aircraft lost height and plunged in the sea. The wreckage was found about one km off Woodside Beach and all five occupants were killed. At the time of the accident, weather conditions were good.
Crew:
Cpt Mark Lewin, pilot,
F/Lt Tim Ellis, copilot,
F/Lt Mark Duncan, pilot,
W/O Jon Fawcett, flight engineer,
W/O Al Gwynne, loadmaster.
Probable cause:
The Board of Inquiry concluded that the instructor devised a demonstration of asymmetric flight that was 'inherently dangerous and that was certain to lead to a sudden departure from controlled flight' and that he did not appreciate this. The Board noted there were deficiencies in the acquisition and documentation of 707 operational knowledge within the RAAF combined with the absence of effective mechanisms to prevent the erosion of operational knowledge at a time when large numbers of pilots were resigning from the air force. There was no official 707 QFI conversion course and associated syllabus and no adequate QFI instructors' manual. There were deficiencies in the documented procedures and limitations pertaining to asymmetric flight in the 707 and a lack of fidelity in the RAAF 707 simulator in the flight regime in which the accident occurred, which, assuming such a requirement existed, required actual practise in flight. 'The captain acted with the best of intentions but without sufficient professional knowledge or understanding of the consequences of the situation in which he placed the aircraft,' the Board said.

Crash of a GAF Nomad N.22B in Leongatha

Date & Time: Apr 5, 1990 at 0645 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
VH-DNM
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Leongatha - Leongatha
MSN:
25
YOM:
1976
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
On completion of temporary repairs following a forced landing accident in a paddock, a permit to fly was issued authorising a ferry flight from the accident site to a nearby strip. During the take off roll the pilot was unable to maintain directional control and the aircraft crossed a drain before striking a fence and overturning. An inspection of the aircraft did not reveal any defect which could have contributed to the loss of directional control. Following the landing accident the property owner had rotary-hoed the paddock to a depth of 10 centimetres. Using a motor vehicle, the pilot compacted a 2.5 metre wide strip along the centreline of the paddock, which sloped approximately 3 degrees down to the north. At the time of the takeoff to the north the wind was from the north-east at 5 knots. The pilot selected a takeoff power setting of 53 percent of the maximum power available which effectively increased the take off ground roll required by approximately 170 metres.
Probable cause:
The investigation revealed that after a 50 metre ground roll the left main wheel entered the rotary-hoed area. The aircraft then veered further to the left before striking the fence and overturning.
The following factors were considered relevant to the development of the accident:
- The strip width was inadequate for the safe operation of the aircraft.
- The pilot did not maintain directional control during the take-off.
- The pilot delayed abandoning the take-off.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna 414A Chancellor near Wonthaggi

Date & Time: Oct 27, 1989 at 0833 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-SDV
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Melbourne – Port Welshpool
MSN:
414A-0261
YOM:
1979
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The pilot reported that whilst enroute from Essendon to Wonthaggi he descended to the lowest safe altitude of 3600 feet above sea level, lowered the landing gear, reduced power and airspeed to counter the effect of turbulence and entered a holding pattern to the south south west of the Wonthaggi navigation aid. During the holding pattern the aircraft descended until it collided with trees that were 865 feet above sea level. The weather at the time included gale force winds, rain and low cloud. There were no thunderstorms or microbursts in the area, however, other aircraft reported a very low cloud base and severe turbulence. A few minutes prior to the accident ground witnesses, south south west of the accident site, reported an aircraft matching the description of VH-SDV, flying below a low, misty, ragged cloud base. There was no record of another aircraft in the area at the time. Information was available which indicated that the aircraft had descended below 3600 feet during the approach to Wonthaggi. The passengers reported that the pilot gave no indication of any problem or danger. Until the impact, they believed the aircraft was descending normally for a landing at Port Welshpool.
Probable cause:
No aircraft defects were found which may have been factors in the accident. The investigation indicates that the pilot attempted to fly under the low cloud base, in order to reach the Port Welshpool destination where weather conditions were earlier reported to have been partially sunny. Port Welshpool is not serviced by an approved navigation aid. The pilot attempted to descend below the cloud base, hoping to achieve visual flight conditions to continue to his destination.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft 65-B80 Queen Air in Tolmie: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jul 6, 1989 at 0341 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
VH-XAE
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Sydney - Melbourne
MSN:
LD-305
YOM:
1966
Location:
Country:
Region:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
At 0341 hours EST on 6 July 1989, Beechcraft 80 Queen Air aircraft registered VH-XAE collided with high voltage power lines and descended rapidly, contacting the ground three kilometres north-east of Tolmie. The pilot, who was the only occupant, received fatal injuries. There was no fire. The aircraft was on a flight from Sydney to Melbourne cruising at 8000 feet. Persons in the accident area heard an aircraft flying very low over their houses, then observed a flash of light and heard the sound of ground impact. A ground search was commenced but due to falling snow and very poor visibility the wreckage was not found until about 0745 hours in daylight. The elevation of the ground at the accident site was approximately 2,700 feet above sea level.
Probable cause:
The exact cause of the accident could not be determined.
Final Report: