Crash of a Swearingen SA227AC Metro III in La Alianza: 2 killed

Date & Time: Dec 2, 2013 at 2010 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N831BC
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
CSQ405
MSN:
AC-654B
YOM:
1986
Flight number:
Santo Domingo - San Juan
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
1740
Captain / Total hours on type:
686.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
1954
Copilot / Total hours on type:
92
Aircraft flight hours:
33888
Circumstances:
The captain and first officer were conducting an international cargo flight in the twin-engine turboprop airplane. After about 40 minutes of flight during night visual meteorological conditions, an air traffic controller cleared the airplane for a descent to 7,000 ft and then another controller further cleared the airplane for a descent to 3,000 ft and told the flight crew to expect an ILS (instrument landing system) approach. During the descent, about 7,300 ft and about 290 kts, the airplane entered a shallow left turn, followed by a 45-degree right turn and a rapid, uncontrolled descent, during which the airplane broke up about 1,500 ft over uneven terrain. The moderately loaded cargo airplane was not equipped with a flight data recorder or cockpit voice recorder (CVR) (although it previously had a CVR in its passenger configuration) nor was it required by Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations. There were also no avionics on board with downloadable or nonvolatile memory. As a result, there was limited information available to determine what led to the uncontrolled descent or what occurred as the flight crew attempted to regain control of the airplane. Also, although the first officer was identified in FAA-recorded radio transmissions several minutes before the loss of control and it was company policy that the pilot not flying make those transmissions, it could not be determined who was at the controls when either the loss of control occurred or when the airplane broke up. There was no evidence of any in-flight mechanical failures that would have resulted in the loss of control, and the airplane was loaded within limits. Evidence of all flight control surfaces was confirmed, and, to the extent possible, flight control continuity was also confirmed. Evidence also indicated that both engines were operating at the time of the accident, and, although one of the four propeller blades from the right propeller was not located after separating from the fractured hub, there was no evidence of any preexisting propeller anomalies. The electrically controlled pitch trim actuator did not exhibit any evidence of runaway pitch, and measurements of the actuator rods indicated that the airplane was trimmed slightly nose low, consistent for the phase of flight. Due to the separation of the wings and tail, the in-flight positions of the manually operated aileron and rudder trim wheels could not be determined. Other similarly documented accidents and incidents generally involved unequal fuel burns, which resulted in wing drops or airplane rolls. In one case, the flight crew intentionally induced an excessive slide slip to balance fuel between the wings, which resulted in an uncontrolled roll. However, in the current investigation, the fuel cross feed valve was found in the closed position, indicating that a fuel imbalance was likely not a concern of the flight crew. In at least two other events, unequal fuel loads also involved autopilots that reached their maximum hold limits, snapped off, and rolled the airplane. Although the airplane in this accident did not have an autopilot, historical examples indicate that a sudden yawing or rolling motion, regardless of the source, could result in a roll, nose tuck, and loss of control. The roll may have been recoverable, and in one documented case, a pilot was able to recover the airplane, but after it lost almost 11,000 ft of altitude. During this accident flight, it was likely that, during the descent, the flight crew did regain control of the airplane to the extent that the flight control surfaces were effective. With darkness and the rapid descent at a relatively low altitude, one or both crewmembers likely pulled hard on the yoke to arrest the downward trajectory, and, in doing so, placed the wings broadside against the force of the relative wind, which resulted in both wings failing upward. As the wings failed, the propellers simultaneously chopped through the fuselage behind the cockpit. At the same time, the horizontal stabilizers were also positioned broadside against the relative wind, and they also failed upward. Evidence also revealed that, at some point, the flight crew lowered the landing gear. Although it could not be determined when they lowered the gear, it could have been in an attempt to slow or regain control of the airplane during the descent. Although reasons for the loss of control could not be definitively determined, the lack of any preexisting mechanical anomalies indicates a likelihood of flight crew involvement. Then, during the recovery attempt, the flight crew's actions, while operating under the difficult circumstances of darkness and rapidly decreasing altitude, resulted in the overstress of the airplane.
Probable cause:
The flight crew's excessive elevator input during a rapid descent under night lighting conditions, which resulted in the overstress and breakup of the airplane. Contributing to the
accident was an initial loss of airplane control for reasons that could not be determined because postaccident examination revealed no mechanical anomalies that would have
precluded normal operation.
Final Report:

Crash of a Rockwell Aero Commander 500 near Puerto Plata: 7 killed

Date & Time: Jan 28, 2001 at 0815 LT
Operator:
Registration:
HI-535SP
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Santo Domingo - Puerto Plata
MSN:
500-840
YOM:
1959
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
5
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
7
Circumstances:
While descending to Puerto Plata Airport, the crew encountered poor weather conditions and limited visibility due to low clouds and fog. The twin engine aircraft struck the slope of Mt Loma del Toro located few km from Puerto Plata and was destroyed. All seven occupants were killed. The crew started the approach prematurely and descended too low in poor visibility.

Crash of a Douglas DC-8-61F in Miami: 5 killed

Date & Time: Aug 7, 1997 at 1236 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N27UA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Miami - Santo Domingo
MSN:
45942
YOM:
1968
Flight number:
FB101A
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
5
Captain / Total flying hours:
12154
Captain / Total hours on type:
2522.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
2641
Copilot / Total hours on type:
1592
Aircraft flight hours:
46825
Aircraft flight cycles:
41688
Circumstances:
Fine Air Flight 101 was originally scheduled to depart Miami for Santo Domingo at 09:15 using another DC-8 airplane, N30UA, to carry cargo for Aeromar. Due to a delay of the inbound aircraft, Fine Air substituted N27UA for N30UA and rescheduled the departure for 12:00. N27UA arrived at Miami at 09:31 from San Juan, Puerto Rico, and was parked at the Fine Air hangar ramp. The security guard was not aware of the airplane change, and he instructed Aeromar loaders to load the airplane in accordance with the weight distribution form he possessed for N30UA. The first cargo pallet for flight 101 was loaded onto N27UA at 10:30 and the last pallet was loaded at 12:06. The resulting center of gravity (CG) of the accident airplane was near or even aft of the airplane’s aft CG limit. After the three crew members and the security guard had boarded the plane, the cabin door `was closed at 12:22. Eleven minutes later the flight obtained taxi clearance for runway 27R. The Miami tower controller cleared flight 101 for takeoff at 12:34. Takeoff power was selected and the DC-8 moved down the runway. The flightcrew performed an elevator check at 80 knots. Fourteen seconds later the sound of a thump was heard. Just after calling V1 a second thump was heard. Two seconds later the airplane rotated. Immediately after takeoff the airplane pitched nose-up and entered a stall. The DC-8 recovered briefly from the stall, and stalled again. The airplane impacted terrain in a tail first, right wing down attitude. it slid west across a road (72nd Avenue) and into the International Airport Center at 28th Street and burst into flames. Investigation showed that the center of gravity resulted in the airplane’s trim being mis-set by at least 1.5 units airplane nose up, which presented the flightcrew with a pitch control problem on takeoff.
Probable cause:
The probable cause of the accident, which resulted from the airplane being misloaded to produce a more aft center of gravity and a correspondingly incorrect stabilizer trim setting that precipitated an extreme pitch-up at rotation, was
1) The failure of Fine Air to exercise operational control over the cargo loading process; and
2) The failure of Aeromar to load the airplane as specified by Fine Air.
Contributing to the accident was the failure of the FAA to adequately monitor Fine Airs operational control responsibilities for cargo loading and the failure of the FAA to ensure that known cargo-related deficiencies were corrected at Fine Air.
Final Report:

Crash of a Convair CV-240-53 in San Juan

Date & Time: Jun 30, 1997 at 0745 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N344MM
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
San Juan - Santo Domingo
MSN:
53-26
YOM:
1954
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
9000
Captain / Total hours on type:
6970.00
Aircraft flight hours:
24793
Circumstances:
After departing from runway 08, the airplane climbed to 400 feet above ground level (agl) where the left engine lost power. After confirming a loss of power, the pilot feathered the left propeller, and called for maximum 'dry' thrust on the right engine. Wet power was available which would have provided 450 additional horsepower, however, the pilot elected not to use it. The airplane was unable to maintain altitude, collided with a palm tree, and came to rest on the beach in the surf line. The reason for the left engine malfunction was not determined due to salt water damage. The airplane was 600 pounds over maximum weight.
Probable cause:
A loss of engine power for undetermined reasons, the pilot's improper emergency procedure after the power loss, and the overloading of the airplane, resulting in an inability to maintain altitude and terrain clearance.
Final Report:

Crash of a Convair CV-440-98F Metropolitan near La Romana: 2 killed

Date & Time: Jun 27, 1995 at 0950 LT
Operator:
Registration:
N356SA
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Santo Domingo - Aguadilla
MSN:
432
YOM:
1957
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The aircraft departed Santo Domingo-Las Américas Airport at 0822LT on a cargo flight to Aguadilla. Few minutes later, the crew informed ATC about technical problems and was cleared to return. In unclear circumstances, the aircraft crashed 88 minutes after its departure in an isolated area located in the region of La Romana. The aircraft was destroyed and both pilots were killed.

Crash of a BAe 125-400 in Saint Domingo

Date & Time: Apr 7, 1995 at 1745 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N41953
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Santo Domingo - Santo Domingo
MSN:
25268
YOM:
1971
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
4
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The crew was completing a short flight from Santo Domingo-Las Américas Airport to Santo Domingo-Herrera Airport located in the city center. On short final, the pilot-in-command mistakenly reduced the engine power too much, causing the aircraft to lose height and to struck the runway surface with an excessive vertical speed. The aircraft landed hard, bounced and came to rest few hundred metres further. All six occupants escaped uninjured and the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Ground fire of a Boeing 727-281 in Santo Domingo

Date & Time: Sep 5, 1993
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
HI-617CA
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
San Juan - Santo Domingo
MSN:
20726
YOM:
1973
Crew on board:
7
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
98
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Twenty minutes after takeoff from San Juan-Luis Muñoz Marin Airport, while in cruising altitude, a steward noticed smoke in the lavatory and informed the crew accordingly. In the meantime, the crew noticed a fire alarm in the cockpit, declared an emergency and became number one for landing at Santo Domingo-Las Américas Airport. Following a normal approach and landing, the crew vacated the runway and parked the aircraft at gate A6. While the passengers was disemmarking, smoke spread in the cabin and fire erupted, destroying the airplane.
Probable cause:
It was determined that a fire broke out in the rear lavatory after an engine used to drain the toilet overheated.

Crash of a Douglas DC-7CF in Santo Domingo

Date & Time: Feb 18, 1993
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
HI-599CT
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
MSN:
45208
YOM:
1957
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
During the takeoff roll at Santo Domingo-Las Américas Airport, the copilot started the rotation but the aircraft failed to respond. The captain took over controls when the aircraft started to veer to the left and skidded. The crew aborted the takeoff procedure when the aircraft rolled left and right, causing the right wing to struck the ground. On impact, both right engines n°3 and 4 were torn off. Out of control, the aircraft veered off runway to the right, lost its undercarriage and came to rest, bursting into flames. All three crew members escaped uninjured while the aircraft was destroyed.

Crash of an Ilyushin II-18D in Puerto Plata: 34 killed

Date & Time: Nov 15, 1992 at 1845 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
CU-T1270
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Santo Domingo - Puerto Plata – Havana
MSN:
187 0103 01
YOM:
1967
Crew on board:
6
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
28
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
34
Circumstances:
While on a VOR approach to runway 26 at Puerto Plata-Gregorio Luperón Airport, the crew decided to make a circling visual approach to runway 08. While turning, the four engine aircraft struck the Peak Isabel de Torres located 14 km west of runway 08 threshold. The aircraft disintegrated on impact and all 34 occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
For unknown reasons, the crew completed the last 'base leg tun' at an excessive distance of 9 nm instead of the prescribed 4 nm. The approach was completed by night and the crew failed to sea and avoid the mountain.

Crash of a Douglas DC-7CF off Fort Lauderdale

Date & Time: Nov 6, 1992 at 0225 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
HI-619SP
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Fort Lauderdale - Santo Domingo
MSN:
45158
YOM:
1956
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The crew reported over radio that the #4 engine failed shortly after takeoff, and they were attempting to dump fuel when the #2 engine overheated. They then intentionally ditched the airplane. The wreckage was recovered about 2 weeks afterward, and the airplane was about 50% corroded away. Due to massive salt water corrosion, no preimpact failure/malfunction of the #4 engine could be identified. No record of airplane/operator being granted cfr part 129 certificate authority. No substantiation of the times in service for the airplane, engines, propellers, and time change components or airworthiness directives could be determined.
Probable cause:
Failure of the #4 engine for an undetermined reasons(s), and the inability of the airplane to remain airborne due to the over gross weight takeoff performed by the pilot. Factors which contributed to the accident were: the questionable airworthiness of the airplane and engines due to the lack of records, and the failure of the federal aviation administration to adequately surveil the operator.
Final Report: