Crash of a Gulfstream GIV SP in Santo Domingo: 9 killed

Date & Time: Dec 15, 2021 at 1722 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
HI1050
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
La Isabela - Orlando
MSN:
1482
YOM:
2002
Crew on board:
3
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
6
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
9
Circumstances:
The aircraft departed La Isabela-Dr. Joaquín Balaguer Airport on a charter flight to Orlando, carrying six passengers and three crew members. Shortly after takeoff, the crew informed ATC about technical problems and was cleared to divert to Santo Domingo-Las Américas Airport for an emergency landing. On approach, the aircraft went out of control and crashed, bursting into flames. The aircraft disintegrated on impact and all nine occupants were killed, among them the Portorican music artist José Angel Hernández aka Flow La Movie. According to a preliminary report, the crew encountered technical problems with the spoilers and maintenance was performed to change the ground spoiler actuators. After maintenance, the crew completed a ground check and while all spoilers properly deployed on both wings, only the spoilers on the left wing retracted as the spoilers on the right wing remained deployed. The crew failed to notice this asymetry. Immediately after takeoff, the crew reported controllability problems and elected to return but finally decided to divert to Las Américas Airport. The aircraft eventually went out of control and crashed 16 minutes after takeoff.

Crash of a Swearingen SA227AC Metro III in La Alianza: 2 killed

Date & Time: Dec 2, 2013 at 2010 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N831BC
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
CSQ405
MSN:
AC-654B
YOM:
1986
Flight number:
Santo Domingo - San Juan
Country:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
1740
Captain / Total hours on type:
686.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
1954
Copilot / Total hours on type:
92
Aircraft flight hours:
33888
Circumstances:
The captain and first officer were conducting an international cargo flight in the twin-engine turboprop airplane. After about 40 minutes of flight during night visual meteorological conditions, an air traffic controller cleared the airplane for a descent to 7,000 ft and then another controller further cleared the airplane for a descent to 3,000 ft and told the flight crew to expect an ILS (instrument landing system) approach. During the descent, about 7,300 ft and about 290 kts, the airplane entered a shallow left turn, followed by a 45-degree right turn and a rapid, uncontrolled descent, during which the airplane broke up about 1,500 ft over uneven terrain. The moderately loaded cargo airplane was not equipped with a flight data recorder or cockpit voice recorder (CVR) (although it previously had a CVR in its passenger configuration) nor was it required by Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations. There were also no avionics on board with downloadable or nonvolatile memory. As a result, there was limited information available to determine what led to the uncontrolled descent or what occurred as the flight crew attempted to regain control of the airplane. Also, although the first officer was identified in FAA-recorded radio transmissions several minutes before the loss of control and it was company policy that the pilot not flying make those transmissions, it could not be determined who was at the controls when either the loss of control occurred or when the airplane broke up. There was no evidence of any in-flight mechanical failures that would have resulted in the loss of control, and the airplane was loaded within limits. Evidence of all flight control surfaces was confirmed, and, to the extent possible, flight control continuity was also confirmed. Evidence also indicated that both engines were operating at the time of the accident, and, although one of the four propeller blades from the right propeller was not located after separating from the fractured hub, there was no evidence of any preexisting propeller anomalies. The electrically controlled pitch trim actuator did not exhibit any evidence of runaway pitch, and measurements of the actuator rods indicated that the airplane was trimmed slightly nose low, consistent for the phase of flight. Due to the separation of the wings and tail, the in-flight positions of the manually operated aileron and rudder trim wheels could not be determined. Other similarly documented accidents and incidents generally involved unequal fuel burns, which resulted in wing drops or airplane rolls. In one case, the flight crew intentionally induced an excessive slide slip to balance fuel between the wings, which resulted in an uncontrolled roll. However, in the current investigation, the fuel cross feed valve was found in the closed position, indicating that a fuel imbalance was likely not a concern of the flight crew. In at least two other events, unequal fuel loads also involved autopilots that reached their maximum hold limits, snapped off, and rolled the airplane. Although the airplane in this accident did not have an autopilot, historical examples indicate that a sudden yawing or rolling motion, regardless of the source, could result in a roll, nose tuck, and loss of control. The roll may have been recoverable, and in one documented case, a pilot was able to recover the airplane, but after it lost almost 11,000 ft of altitude. During this accident flight, it was likely that, during the descent, the flight crew did regain control of the airplane to the extent that the flight control surfaces were effective. With darkness and the rapid descent at a relatively low altitude, one or both crewmembers likely pulled hard on the yoke to arrest the downward trajectory, and, in doing so, placed the wings broadside against the force of the relative wind, which resulted in both wings failing upward. As the wings failed, the propellers simultaneously chopped through the fuselage behind the cockpit. At the same time, the horizontal stabilizers were also positioned broadside against the relative wind, and they also failed upward. Evidence also revealed that, at some point, the flight crew lowered the landing gear. Although it could not be determined when they lowered the gear, it could have been in an attempt to slow or regain control of the airplane during the descent. Although reasons for the loss of control could not be definitively determined, the lack of any preexisting mechanical anomalies indicates a likelihood of flight crew involvement. Then, during the recovery attempt, the flight crew's actions, while operating under the difficult circumstances of darkness and rapidly decreasing altitude, resulted in the overstress of the airplane.
Probable cause:
The flight crew's excessive elevator input during a rapid descent under night lighting conditions, which resulted in the overstress and breakup of the airplane. Contributing to the
accident was an initial loss of airplane control for reasons that could not be determined because postaccident examination revealed no mechanical anomalies that would have
precluded normal operation.
Final Report:

Crash of a Piper PA-31-350 Navajo Chieftain in Constanza: 2 killed

Date & Time: Sep 27, 2012 at 1545 LT
Registration:
N711WX
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Constanza - Santo Domingo
MSN:
31-7552131
YOM:
1975
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from Constanza-14 de Junio Airport, bound to Las Américas Airport in Santo Domingo, the twin engine aircraft went out of control and crashed in a wooded area, bursting into flames. The burnt wreckage was found near the village of Tireo, about 3 km northeast of the airport. The aircraft was destroyed and both occupants were killed. The exact circumstances of the accident are unclear. It is believed that the flight was illegal and that a load of 11 of cocaine was found at the crash site.

Crash of a Rockwell Aero Commander 500 in Santo Domingo

Date & Time: Sep 23, 2010 at 1245 LT
Registration:
N100PV
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
San Juan - Santo Domingo
MSN:
500-784
YOM:
1959
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
2500
Captain / Total hours on type:
100.00
Aircraft flight hours:
7810
Circumstances:
The twin engine aircraft departed San Juan-Isla Grande Airport on a private flight to Santo Domingo with two passengers and two pilots on board. On final approach to Santo Domingo-Las Américas-Dr. José Francisco Peña Gómez Airport, at an altitude of 2,000 feet and at a distance of 8 km from the airport, both engines failed simultaneously. As the crew realized he was unable to reach the airport, he attempted an emergency landing when the aircraft crashed in a dense wooded area located about one km southeast of runway 35 threshold. All four occupants escaped uninjured and the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.
Probable cause:
Double engine failure on final approach due to fuel exhaustion. It was determined that prior to takeoff from San Juan Airport, the fuel quantity in the tanks was sufficient for the flight to Santo Domingo. But the fuel cap was missing prior to takeoff and the crew applied some 'duct tape' in an attempt to replace the fuel cap. Despite the aircraft was unworthy, the crew decided to takeoff in such conditions. Because the fuel cap was missing, some fuel leaked in flight, causing both engines to stop on final approach to Santo Domingo Airport.
Final Report:

Crash of a Cessna T303 Crusader in Santa Rosa del Toachi: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jun 6, 2009 at 1300 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
HC-BRD
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Guayaquil - Santo Domingo
MSN:
303-00084
YOM:
1981
Country:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
While cruising in poor weather conditions, the twin engine aircraft impacted trees and crashed in a wooded an hilly terrain located in the Santa Rosa del Toachi Mountain Range. The wreckage was found few hours later and the pilot, sole on board, was killed.
Probable cause:
Controlled flight into terrain after the pilot was flying under VFR mode in IMC conditions.

Crash of a Cessna 501 Citation I/SP off Santo Domingo: 1 killed

Date & Time: Aug 18, 2008 at 2029 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N223LC
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Santo Domingo - San Juan
MSN:
501-0055
YOM:
1978
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The aircraft departed Santo Domingo-Las Améericas Airport at 2026LT on a positioning flight to San Juan, Porto Rico. While climbing in night conditions, the pilot lost control of the airplane that crashed in the sea few km offshore. SAR operations were initiated but no trace of the aircraft nor the pilot was found.

Crash of an Ilyushin II-62M in Saint Domingo

Date & Time: Apr 20, 2008 at 1430 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
CU-T1283
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Santo Domingo - Havana
MSN:
4053823
YOM:
1991
Flight number:
CU201
Crew on board:
8
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
109
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Few minute after takeoff from Santo Domingo-Las Américas Airport, while cruising at an altitude of 25,000 feet, some 83 km from Santo Domingo, the captain informed ATC about the explosion of the engine n°2 and that a cabin decompression occurred. The crew was cleared for an immediate return and the aircraft landed uneventful few minutes later. All 117 occupants evacuated safely. However, the aircraft was considered as damaged beyond repair due to severe damages to the engines n°2 and n°1 as well as the fuselage because debris of the engine n°2 punctured the fuselage and came to rest in the cabin.

Crash of a Raytheon 390 Premier I in Santo Domingo

Date & Time: Jan 8, 2003 at 1824 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N390RB
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Santo Domingo - Santo Domingo
MSN:
RB-26
YOM:
2002
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
The aircraft overran the runway and came to rest in a parking lot, while landing at Herrera International Airport, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, while on a 14 CFR Part 91 positioning flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and a visual flight rules flight plan was filed. The airplane received substantial damage and the airline transport-rated pilot, copilot, and two passengers received minor injuries. The flight originated from Las Americas International Airport, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, the same day, about 1810. The pilot stated they made a normal approach and landing on runway 19 at Herrera International Airport. Once on the ground they activated lift dump spoilers, but the system failed. They were unable to stop the airplane on the remaining runway. The airplane came to a stop, inverted beyond a street that is at the end of the runway.

Crash of a Beechcraft B60 Duke off Santo Domingo: 1 killed

Date & Time: Jan 3, 2003 at 2030 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
HI-774CT
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Santo Domingo - Santo Domingo
MSN:
P-445
YOM:
1977
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
The twin engine airplane departed Santo Domingo-Las Américas International Airport on a short flight to the Santo Domingo-Herrera Airport located downtown. Following a night takeoff, the pilot encountered a loss of power on the right engine and was unable to feather its propeller. As the propeller was windmilling, he was unable to maintain a safe altitude and elected to ditch the aircraft that crashed in the sea about 800 metres offshore. The pilot was seriously injured and the passenger was killed.

Crash of an Airbus A300-600 in New York: 265 killed

Date & Time: Nov 12, 2001 at 0916 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N14053
Flight Phase:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
New York - Santo Domingo
MSN:
420
YOM:
1988
Flight number:
AA587
Crew on board:
9
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
251
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
265
Captain / Total flying hours:
8050
Captain / Total hours on type:
1723.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
4403
Copilot / Total hours on type:
1835
Aircraft flight hours:
37550
Aircraft flight cycles:
14934
Circumstances:
On November 12, 2001, about 0916:15 eastern standard time, American Airlines flight 587, an Airbus Industrie A300-605R, N14053, crashed into a residential area of Belle Harbor, New York, shortly after takeoff from John F. Kennedy International Airport, Jamaica, New York. Flight 587 was a regularly scheduled passenger flight to Las Americas International Airport, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, with 2 flight crewmembers, 7 flight attendants, and 251 passengers aboard the airplane. The airplane's vertical stabilizer and rudder separated in flight and were found in Jamaica Bay, about 1 mile north of the main wreckage site. The airplane's engines subsequently separated in flight and were found several blocks north and east of the main wreckage site. All 260 people aboard the airplane and 5 people on the ground were killed, and the airplane was destroyed by impact forces and a post crash fire. Flight 587 was operating under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121 on an instrument flight rules flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident.
Probable cause:
The in-flight separation of the vertical stabilizer as a result of the loads beyond ultimate design that were created by the first officer's unnecessary and excessive rudder pedal inputs. Contributing to these rudder pedal inputs were characteristics of the Airbus A300-600 rudder system design and elements of the American Airlines Advanced Aircraft Maneuvering Program.
Final Report: