Crash of a Beechcraft B60 Duke in Big Spring

Date & Time: Jan 29, 2020 at 1715 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N50JR
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Abilene – Midland
MSN:
P-303
YOM:
1974
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Circumstances:
Enroute from Abilene to Midland, both engines failed. The pilot reduced his altitude and attempted an emergency landing when the aircraft crash landed in a bushy area located in Big Spring. The pilot was injured and the aircraft was damaged beyond repair.

Crash of a Beechcraft A60 Duke near Santa Rosa: 2 killed

Date & Time: May 5, 2019 at 1559 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N102SN
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Arlington - Santa Fe
MSN:
P-217
YOM:
1973
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Circumstances:
The twin engine airplane departed Arlington Municipal Airport at 1431LT bound for Santa Fe. En route, while cruising at an altitude of 9,700 feet, the pilot informed ATC about engine problems and was cleared to divert to Santa Rosa-Route 66 Airport at 1551. The pilot continued the descent when control was lost and the airplane crashed eight minutes later few miles from the airport. Both occupants have been killed.

Crash of a Beechcraft B60 Duke in Fullerton: 1 killed

Date & Time: Apr 18, 2019 at 1950 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N65MY
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Fullerton - Heber City
MSN:
P-314
YOM:
1975
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
1
Circumstances:
Shortly after takeoff from runway 24 at Fullerton Airport, while climbing to a height of 50 feet at a speed of 69 knots, the twin engine airplane went out of control and crashed in flames onto the runway. The aircraft was destroyed and the pilot, sole on board, was killed.

Crash of a Beechcraft 60 Duke in Destin: 4 killed

Date & Time: Aug 30, 2018 at 1030 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N1876L
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Toledo - Destin
MSN:
P-386
YOM:
1976
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
3
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
4
Circumstances:
The aircraft impacted terrain during an approach to the Destin Executive Airport (DTS), Destin, Florida, Texas. The commercial rated pilot and three passengers were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by Henry Leasing Company, LLC, as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 cross-country fight. The flight departed the Toledo Executive airport (TOL) about 0747 en route to DTS, and an instrument flight plan had been filed. A preliminary review of air traffic control (ATC) communications revealed that as the flight approached the destination airport, the pilot was in contact with the Eglin AFB approach controller, reported DTS in sight, and then canceled his IFR clearance. The pilot was then handed over to the DTS tower controller, where the pilot reported that he was about 2 miles north of DTS. There were no further communications between the pilot and air traffic control. The airplane wreckage was located in a remote, wooded area of the Eglin AFB reservation property, about 8.5 miles northwest of the DTS airport and 2.5 miles northwest of the Eglin AFB. The airplane impacted trees, on a 067-degree heading with a wreckage path about 380 feet long. Several fragments of the airplane were located along the wreckage path: the airplane's nose cone was located near the initial impact point, the left-wing tip fuel tank and right outboard wing was near the beginning of the path, and the right horizontal stabilizer and elevator were fragmented and located on the wreckage path. The airplane came to rest inverted, with a post-crash fire consuming most of the cabin and inboard section of the wings. Both engines had impact and fire damage; with the right engine located just right of the main wreckage. The left engine was located in front of the main wreckage. Both 3-bladed propellers had broken from and was next to their respective engines.

Crash of a Beechcraft B60 Duke near Ferris

Date & Time: Mar 1, 2018 at 1100 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N77MM
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Addison – Mexia
MSN:
P-587
YOM:
1982
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
6400
Captain / Total hours on type:
2200.00
Aircraft flight hours:
2210
Circumstances:
The pilot in the multi-engine, retractable landing gear airplane reported that, during an instrument flight rules cross-country flight, about 5,000 ft above mean sea level, the left engine surged several times and he performed an emergency engine shutdown. Shortly afterward, the right engine lost power. During the emergency descent, the airplane struck treetops, and landed hard in a field with the landing gear retracted. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings, the engine mounts, and the lower fuselage. The pilot reported that he had requested 200 gallons of fuel from his home airport fixed base operator, but they did not fuel the airplane. The pilot did not check the fuel quantity during his preflight inspection. According to the Federal Aviation Administration Airplane Flying Handbook, Chapter 2, page 2-7, pilots must always positively confirm the fuel quantity by visually inspecting the fuel level in each tank. The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.
Probable cause:
The pilot's improper preflight inspection of the fuel level, which resulted in a loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's failure to lower the landing gear before the emergency landing.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft B60 Duke in Duette: 2 killed

Date & Time: Mar 4, 2017 at 1330 LT
Type of aircraft:
Operator:
Registration:
N39AG
Flight Phase:
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
MSN:
P-425
YOM:
1977
Location:
Crew on board:
2
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
1120
Captain / Total hours on type:
200.00
Copilot / Total flying hours:
20900
Copilot / Total hours on type:
165
Aircraft flight hours:
3271
Circumstances:
The private pilot, who had recently purchased the airplane, and the flight instructor were conducting an instructional flight in the multi-engine airplane to meet insurance requirements. Radar data for the accident flight, which occurred on the second day of 2 days of training, showed the airplane maneuvering between 1,000 ft and 1,200 ft above ground level (agl) just before the accident. The witness descriptions of the accident were consistent with the airplane transitioning from slow flight into a stall that developed into a spin from which the pilots were unable to recover before the airplane impacted terrain. Examination of the wreckage did not reveal evidence of any preexisting mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane. After the first day of training, the pilot told friends and fellow pilots that the instructor provided non-standard training that included stall practice that required emergency recoveries at low airspeed and low altitude. The instructor used techniques that were not in keeping with established flight training standards and were not what would be expected from an individual with his extensive background in general aviation flight instruction. Most critically, the instructor used two techniques that introduced unnecessary risk: increasing power before reducing the angle of attack during a stall recovery and introducing asymmetric power while recovering from a stall in a multi-engine airplane; both techniques are dangerous errors because they can lead to an airplane entering a spin. At one point during the first day of training, the airplane entered a full stall and spun before control was regained at very low altitude. The procedures performed contradicted standard practice and Federal Aviation Administration guidance; yet, despite the pilot's experience in multi-engine airplanes and in the accident airplane make and model, he chose to continue the second day of training with the instructor instead of seeking a replacement to complete the insurance check out. The spin encountered on the accident flight likely resulted from the stall recovery errors advocated by the instructor and practiced on the prior day's flight. Unlike the previous flight, the accident flight did not have sufficient altitude for recovery because of the low altitude it was operating at, which was below the safe altitude required for stall training (one which allows recovery no lower than 3,000 ft agl).
Probable cause:
The pilots' decision to perform flight training maneuvers at low airspeed at an altitude that was insufficient for stall recovery. Contributing to the accident was the flight instructor's inappropriate use of non-standard stall recovery techniques.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft A60 Duke in Abilene

Date & Time: Feb 24, 2013 at 1020 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N7466D
Flight Type:
Survivors:
Yes
Schedule:
Fort Smith – Abilene
MSN:
P-139
YOM:
1970
Location:
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
0
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
0
Captain / Total flying hours:
7500
Captain / Total hours on type:
800.00
Aircraft flight hours:
3725
Circumstances:
The pilot reported that he had added fuel at the previous fuel stop and that he was using a fuel totalizer to determine the quantity of fuel onboard. After climbing to a cruise altitude of 14,000 feet above ground level, he discovered that the fuel mixture control was frozen and that he was unable to lean the mixture to a lower fuel flow setting. The pilot reported that because of the increased fuel consumption, he briefly considered an en route stop for additional fuel but decided to continue. During descent, the airplane experienced a complete loss of power in both engines, and the pilot made an emergency off-field, gear-up landing about 7 miles from the destination. The airplane impacted terrain and thick scrub trees, which resulted in substantial damage to both wings, both engine mounts, and the fuselage. A postaccident examination found that only a trace of fuel remained. The pilot also reported that there was no mechanical malfunction or failure and that his inadequate fuel management was partly because he had become overconfident in his abilities after 50 years of flying.
Probable cause:
The pilot’s improper fuel management, which resulted in a loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft 60 Duke in Kinston: 3 killed

Date & Time: Apr 1, 1991 at 1326 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N311MC
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Schedule:
Kinston – Stuart
MSN:
P-366
YOM:
1976
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
2
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
3
Captain / Total flying hours:
2345
Captain / Total hours on type:
500.00
Circumstances:
During takeoff from runway 22, the pilot reported that he had a problem, then there was no further communication from the aircraft. Several witnesses saw an object fall from the aircraft and one witness observed that a 'hood' had opened. The aircraft was maneuvered onto final approach to runway 36. A witness said that as the aircraft was lining up on final approach, it entered a steep bank and descended out of his sight. Subsequently, it collided with trees in a 27° descent, crashed and burned. A bag from the nose baggage compartment was found near the departure end of runway 22. No preimpact part failure or system malfunction of the aircraft was found. Before the flight, a ramp person observed the pilot servicing the left engine with oil, but he did not know if the pilot had secured the baggage door. An examination of the recovered door assembly failed to disclose a malfunction of the rear latch assembly. The forward latch assembly area was destroyed by fire. All three occupants were killed.
Probable cause:
The pilot diverted his attention and failed to maintain control of the aircraft, while maneuvering for a precautionary landing. Factors related to the accident were: the unsecured baggage compartment door and the pilot's inadequate preflight.
Final Report:

Crash of a Beechcraft 60 Duke in Erie: 2 killed

Date & Time: Dec 28, 1989 at 1201 LT
Type of aircraft:
Registration:
N478AD
Flight Type:
Survivors:
No
Site:
Schedule:
Erie - Erie
MSN:
P-59
YOM:
1968
Crew on board:
1
Crew fatalities:
Pax on board:
1
Pax fatalities:
Other fatalities:
Total fatalities:
2
Captain / Total flying hours:
3100
Captain / Total hours on type:
2100.00
Circumstances:
The pilot departed on a local VFR flight at 1117. At 1154 he contacted Erie tower for landing. He then advised the tower at 1159 that he had feathered the right engine. One minute later he reported that the left engine was '...kicking out.' The aircraft stalled into a house 6 miles from the airport, and just short of the shoreline of Lake Erie. No fuel was found in the right wing. 7 gallons were drained from the left wing; no fuel was found in the left engine. Right fuel quantity c/b secured in out position by wire tie; several burned components found on back of right fuel quantity gage pc board. Most recent record of fuel purchase which could be found was for May 25, 1989. A pocket diary was found in the wreckage which contained entries of flight times and fuel quantity notations. The accident occurred at 155 Euclide Avenue, Erie, about six miles east of runway 24 threshold. Both occupants were killed.
Pilot:
Floyd E. Smith.
Passenger:
Elwood Graham.
Probable cause:
The pilot's failure to assure that the aircraft had an adequate supply of fuel on board for the intended flight. Contributing factors to the accident were an inoperative right fuel quantity gage which resulted in inaccurate fuel consumption calculations, and an inadvertent stall as the pilot attempted to reach a lake shore for an emergency landing.
Final Report: